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First Aid and Preparedness © Copyright 2003 The American National Red Cross. All rights reserved in all countries.

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Presentation on theme: "First Aid and Preparedness © Copyright 2003 The American National Red Cross. All rights reserved in all countries."— Presentation transcript:

1 First Aid and Preparedness © Copyright 2003 The American National Red Cross. All rights reserved in all countries.

2 Five Actions Make a Plan Build a Kit Get Trained Volunteer Give Blood

3 Make a Plan Talk Plan Learn Check Supplies Tell Practice

4 Always use the Emergency Action Steps: Check the scene for safety, then check the victim. Call 9-1-1, or your local emergency number to get advanced medical help. Care for the victim. Get Trained Check-Call-Care: The Basics of First Aid

5 Have someone else call or the local emergency number right away. If you have someone else call 9-1-1, make sure you tell that person to come back and tell you that the call has been made. When and How to Call for Help Get Trained

6 Call for the following type of emergencies: Unconsciousness Trouble breathing or breathing in a strange way Persistent chest pain or pressure that lasts longer than 3-5 minutes or goes away and comes back Severe bleeding Pain or pressure in the abdomen that does not go away Calling or the Local Emergency Number Get Trained

7 Call for the following type of emergencies: (cont.) Vomiting blood or passing blood A seizure that lasts more than 5 minutes; multiple seizures; if the person has a seizure and is pregnant or diabetic Possible poisoning Possible head, neck or back injury Possible broken bones Get Trained Calling or the Local Emergency Number

8 Also call immediately for any of these situations: Fire or explosion Downed electrical wires Swiftly moving or rapidly rising water Presence of poisonous gas Vehicle collisions Persons who cannot be moved easily Get Trained Calling or the Local Emergency Number

9 Do not hang up until the dispatcher tells you that it is OK to do so. One of the most important things you can do is to call right away. Get Trained Calling or the Local Emergency Number

10 Shock is life-threatening and can be caused by almost any illness and injury. Get Trained What is Shock?

11 Injuries Excessive bleeding Excessive fluid loss Cardiac emergencies Strokes Seizures Diabetic reactions Get Trained What situations can cause someone to go into shock?

12 Poisoning and allergic reactions Bites and stings Emotional trauma (or stress) Get Trained What situations can cause someone to go into shock? (cont.)

13 Restlessness or irritability Altered consciousness (e.g., drowsy, confused or dazed, or passing out) Nausea (sick to the stomach) Pale or ashen (gray), cool, moist skin Fast breathing Fast pulse Get Trained How do you to recognize shock?

14 Have the victim lie down Call or the local emergency number Control any external bleeding Calm and reassure the victim Raise the victim's legs about 12 inches unless you suspect head, neck or back injuries, or a broken hip or leg Help the victim maintain a normal body temperature Do not give the victim anything to eat or drink Get Trained How do you care for shock?

15 Signs of Internal Bleeding Bruising Tender, Swollen or Hard Area Restlessness Fast Breathing Fast Pulse Pale or Ashen (gray), Cool, Moist Skin Controlling Bleeding Get Trained

16 Most bleeding will stop by itself. For minor bleeding: Wash the wound with soap and water. Bandage the wound. Watch for signs of infection: Wound area becomes swollen and red Area may feel warm or throb Victim may develop fever and feel ill It is important not to directly touch someone else’s blood or open wound. Controlling Bleeding – External Bleeding Get Trained

17 Use protective barriers such as disposable gloves when covering the wound with a sterile dressing. You are more likely to give care to a family member or a friend than someone you don't know because most first aid emergencies happen at home. What kinds of things can you use to prevent touching someone's blood or wound directly? Get Trained

18 Always wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm running water after caring for a wound (even if you used a barrier). Controlling Bleeding Get Trained

19 R Rest I Immobilization C Cold E Elevation Muscle, Bone and Joint Injuries – Basic Care Get Trained

20 Other things you should know and do include: Minimize shock Keep the person from getting chilled or overheated Do not move a seriously injured victim If you have to move the victim, splint the injured part first Muscle, Bone and Joint Injuries – Basic Care Get Trained

21 What are some commonly found items around your home that could be used as splints? Newspapers Magazines Wooden boards or sticks Pillows and blankets (for soft splints) Muscle, Bone and Joint Injuries – Basic Care Get Trained

22 A disaster supplies kit should include: Water Food and a manual can opener Flashlights and batteries First aid kit Battery-powered radio Tools Build a Kit

23 A disaster supplies kit should include: (cont.) Duct tape and plastic sheeting Clothing and bedding Prescription and non-prescription medications Pet supplies Cash and coins Sanitary supplies Build a Kit

24 A disaster supplies kit should include: (cont.) Important papers Contact information and a map Build a Kit

25 Check your kit frequently and restock used items and outdated products. Keep a check-off list with your kit. Build a Kit

26 Contact your local Red Cross chapter at (Insert chapter phone number here) for more information about how to become a volunteer in your community. Volunteer Red Cross Volunteer Opportunities…


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