Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Chapter 1 part 3 Life-Threatening and Non-Life Threatening Conditions.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Chapter 1 part 3 Life-Threatening and Non-Life Threatening Conditions."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 1 part 3 Life-Threatening and Non-Life Threatening Conditions

2 Checking for Life Threatening Conditions An emergency situation is rarely clear cut. An emergency situation is rarely clear cut. The exact steps you take will vary depending on what you find when you reach the victim. The exact steps you take will vary depending on what you find when you reach the victim. In every emergency, follow the emergency action steps. In every emergency, follow the emergency action steps.

3 Checking for Life Threatening Conditions STAY CALM STAY CALM CHECK the scene, then CHECK the victim. CHECK the scene, then CHECK the victim. CALL 9—1—1 or the local emergency number. CALL 9—1—1 or the local emergency number. CARE for the victim until EMS personnel arrive. CARE for the victim until EMS personnel arrive.

4 Checking for Life Threatening Conditions During the CHECK step, check the victim first for any life- threatening conditions. During the CHECK step, check the victim first for any life- threatening conditions. Conditions that are an immediate threat to life include— Unconsciousness. Not breathing. No heartbeat (or pulse). Severe bleeding. Conditions that are an immediate threat to life include— Unconsciousness. Not breathing. No heartbeat (or pulse). Severe bleeding.

5 Checking for Life Threatening Conditions A victim who can speak or cry is conscious, breathing, and has a heartbeat. A victim who can speak or cry is conscious, breathing, and has a heartbeat. However, the person may still have a life- threatening condition that requires calling EMS personnel. For instance, a person may have difficulty breathing, persistent chest pain, or may drift in and out of consciousness. However, the person may still have a life- threatening condition that requires calling EMS personnel. For instance, a person may have difficulty breathing, persistent chest pain, or may drift in and out of consciousness. When possible, the victim should always be checked in the position in which he or she is found. For a conscious infant or child, this may be in the arms of a parent or caregiver. When possible, the victim should always be checked in the position in which he or she is found. For a conscious infant or child, this may be in the arms of a parent or caregiver.

6 Checking an Unconscious Victim Start by checking consciousness. Then check the airway, breathing, and circulation. (ABC) Start by checking consciousness. Then check the airway, breathing, and circulation. (ABC) Sometimes the victim ’ s position may make checking for breathing impossible. In this case, you must carefully roll the victim onto his or her back, but avoid twisting the spine. Sometimes the victim ’ s position may make checking for breathing impossible. In this case, you must carefully roll the victim onto his or her back, but avoid twisting the spine. Then complete the check for life-threatening emergencies. Then complete the check for life-threatening emergencies.

7 Critical Thinking Scenario As you ride along the bike trail on your way home, you are tired but relaxed. You must have ridden at least 10 miles. Then as you round a sharp curve you abruptly swerve. A person is sprawled facedown across the trail. You stop your bike. It is very quiet. The person lies motionless on the pavement.

8 Critical Thinking Questions 1. What might you do to make the scene safe for you to check the victim? 2. What kind of injuries or other problems might the victim on the bike trail have? 3. If the victim on the bike trail does not respond when you tap, what would your next step be? Why?

9 Checking for Life Threatening Conditions Checking a conscious person has two basic steps: Checking a conscious person has two basic steps: 1.Interview the victim and bystanders. 2.Check the victim from head to toe. When possible, the victim should always be checked in the position in which he or she is found. For a conscious infant or child, this may be in the arms of a parent or caregiver. When possible, the victim should always be checked in the position in which he or she is found. For a conscious infant or child, this may be in the arms of a parent or caregiver.

10 Checking A Conscious Victim When possible, remember to identify yourself and get consent to help. When possible, remember to identify yourself and get consent to help. Begin interviewing by asking the victim four simple questions to help you determine what happened and the victim ’ s condition. These include— Begin interviewing by asking the victim four simple questions to help you determine what happened and the victim ’ s condition. These include— 1. What happened? 2. Do you feel pain anywhere? 3. Do you have any allergies? 4. Do you have any medical condition or are you taking any medications?

11 Checking A Conscious Victim If the victim feels pain, ask the victim: If the victim feels pain, ask the victim: 1. To describe it. 2. When the pain started. 3. How bad the pain is. If the victim is unable to give you any information, ask family members, friends, or bystanders. If the victim is unable to give you any information, ask family members, friends, or bystanders.

12 Checking A Conscious Victim Do a head-to-toe examination. Start at the victim ’ s head, checking for changes in consciousness and breathing. Then check the victim ’ s skin. If you do not suspect an injury to the head, neck, or back, determine if there are any other specific injuries. Do a head-to-toe examination. Start at the victim ’ s head, checking for changes in consciousness and breathing. Then check the victim ’ s skin. If you do not suspect an injury to the head, neck, or back, determine if there are any other specific injuries. Ask the victim to tell you if any areas hurt. Avoid touching any painful areas or having the victim move any area that is painful. Ask the victim to tell you if any areas hurt. Avoid touching any painful areas or having the victim move any area that is painful.

13 Checking A Conscious Victim When checking a conscious child or infant, follow the same general steps as for an adult. In addition,— When checking a conscious child or infant, follow the same general steps as for an adult. In addition,— Start by checking toe-to-head. This will ease the child's comfort level. Start by checking toe-to-head. This will ease the child's comfort level. Communicate clearly with the child and parent or caregiver. Communicate clearly with the child and parent or caregiver. Get at eye level and talk slowly and in a friendly manner. Get at eye level and talk slowly and in a friendly manner. Ask simple questions the child can answer easily. Ask simple questions the child can answer easily. When you begin the examination, begin at the toes instead of the head to give the child an opportunity to adjust to the process. When you begin the examination, begin at the toes instead of the head to give the child an opportunity to adjust to the process.

14 Checking A Conscious Victim Use your senses—sight, sound, touch, and smell—to detect anything abnormal. Use your senses—sight, sound, touch, and smell—to detect anything abnormal. Remain constantly aware of the victim ’ s level of consciousness. If the victim becomes unconscious at any time, stop your check and call 911 or the local emergency number. Remain constantly aware of the victim ’ s level of consciousness. If the victim becomes unconscious at any time, stop your check and call 911 or the local emergency number.

15 You are the Citizen Responder Scenario 1 You see a car veer off the road, striking a utility pole. The pole splinters, dropping wires onto the vehicle. You decide to help. How would you respond?

16 You are the Citizen Responder Scenario 2 You arrive at your grandfather ’ s home and find him motionless in the backyard. You hear a neighbor in the yard next door. You decide to help. How would you respond?

17 You are the Citizen Responder Scenario 3 While jogging, you notice a bike rider fall as she rounds a corner on a rain- slick road. She is lying in the road moaning, with her crumpled bike nearby. You decide to help. How would you respond?

18 You are the Citizen Responder Scenario 4 During a softball game, a ball is hit between two players. Both go for the ball. They collide, falling to the ground. One player is holding his arm, screaming in pain. The second player lies motionless. You decide to help. How would you respond?

19 Checking The Victim Part 2 Closing CALL 9—1—1 or the local emergency number immediately if you determine a life-threatening condition exists, To provide care until EMS personnel arrive, follow these general guidelines: CALL 9—1—1 or the local emergency number immediately if you determine a life-threatening condition exists, To provide care until EMS personnel arrive, follow these general guidelines: Do no harm. Monitor breathing and consciousness. Help the victim rest in the most comfortable position. Keep the victim from getting chilled or overheated. Reassure the victim. Provide any specific care needed. Do no harm. Monitor breathing and consciousness. Help the victim rest in the most comfortable position. Keep the victim from getting chilled or overheated. Reassure the victim. Provide any specific care needed.

20 Shock Shock is a life-threatening condition in which an insufficient amount of blood is being delivered to all parts of the body and can result from injury or illness Shock is a life-threatening condition in which an insufficient amount of blood is being delivered to all parts of the body and can result from injury or illness Shock is likely to develop after any serious injury or illness Shock is likely to develop after any serious injury or illness A person showing signs of shock needs immediate medical attention A person showing signs of shock needs immediate medical attention Body systems and organs begin to fail Body systems and organs begin to fail The goals of first aid are to get help quickly and give care to minimize shock while caring for the illness or injury The goals of first aid are to get help quickly and give care to minimize shock while caring for the illness or injury http://www.instructorscorner.org/media/videos/a5.html

21 Signals of shock Restlessness Restlessness Altered level of consciousness Altered level of consciousness Nausea or Vomiting Nausea or Vomiting Pale, Ashen, Cool, Moist skin Pale, Ashen, Cool, Moist skin Rapid breathing Rapid breathing Rapid, weak pulse Rapid, weak pulse Excessive thirst Excessive thirst

22 Caring For Shock Call 9-1-1 Call 9-1-1 Have the person lie down Have the person lie down –Most comfortable position Control External Bleeding Control External Bleeding Help maintain normal body Temperature Help maintain normal body Temperature Do not give the person anything to eat or drink Do not give the person anything to eat or drink Reassure the person Reassure the person Continue to monitor Airway, Breathing, & Circulation Continue to monitor Airway, Breathing, & Circulation


Download ppt "Chapter 1 part 3 Life-Threatening and Non-Life Threatening Conditions."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google