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+ Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP) Positive Behavior Support Plan (PBSP) AAPS Professional Development Created by Vicky James, MA, BCBA

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Presentation on theme: "+ Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP) Positive Behavior Support Plan (PBSP) AAPS Professional Development Created by Vicky James, MA, BCBA"— Presentation transcript:

1 + Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP) Positive Behavior Support Plan (PBSP) AAPS Professional Development Created by Vicky James, MA, BCBA November 5, 2014

2 + WHY DO A BIP? …`` (D) SERVICES.--A child with a disability who is removed from the child's current placement under subparagraph (G) (irrespective of whether the behavior is determined to be a manifestation of the child's disability) or subparagraph (C) shall- ``(i) continue to receive educational services, as provided in section 612(a)(1), so as to enable the child to continue to participate in the general education curriculum, although in another setting, and to progress toward meeting the goals set out in the child's IEP; and ``(ii) receive, as appropriate, a functional behavioral assessment, behavioral intervention services and modifications, that are designed to address the behavior violation so that it does not recur. ``(B) CONSIDERATION OF SPECIAL FACTORS.- - The IEP Team shall-- ``(i) in the case of a child whose behavior impedes the child's learning or that of others, consider the use of positive behavioral interventions and supports, and other strategies, to address that behavior; 2

3 Behavior Intervention Plan FBA PBIS 3

4 + BEHAVIOR INTERVENTION PLAN (BIP) Data Driven Measurable Carried out in a school setting 4

5 + BIP on Tienet Positive Behavior Support Plan (PBIS) Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) 5

6 + Data Sources Interviews Direct Observations Reports (e.g., previous/current IEPs, BIPS, FBAs, etc.) and 3-6 weeks of ABC data with duration and intensity 6

7 + List and Define Target Behaviors What behavior is impacting the student’s education? List and provide an OPERATIONAL definition Describes behavior you can SEE or HEAR 7

8 + Target Behavior Examples Operational Definition Elopement: leaves assigned area during instruction Non-operational Elopement: wanders around Operational Definition Aggression: any hitting, biting, charging, kicking or grabbing often with enough force to leave bruises tear clothing, or leave red marks/scratches Non-operational Aggression: when Suri becomes angry she attacks staff 8

9 + Choose 1 target behavior Elopement was chosen because the aggression typically occurs when trying to get Suri back in her seat. If we find a way to have Suri stay in her assigned location, the aggression should also decrease. 9

10 + Data supporting target behavior BehaviorFrequencyIntensityDurationLongevity ElopementDaily: typically 3 or 4 times a day Scale: 1= returned with one reminder 2= returned or moved to next activity after several techniques 3= engaged in aggression before or next activity 10% is 1 74% is 2 16% is 3 Currently lasts anywhere from 30 seconds to 30 minutes. 68% of elopement incidents last between 10 and 20 minutes. ABC, intensity, and duration data have been taken for 3 weeks. There is a history of elopement last school year. 10

11 + Data sheets on AAPS Website Data sheets can be found on our website OR go to the home page and click on “academics”, then “special education”, then “behavior analysis” OR for other options, training on collecting data or the link to where it is on the Vicky James or someone from the district support team can provide additional training. 11

12 + Target Behavior Function There are typically 4 functions of behavior: Social attention Escape/Avoidance Access to activities or tangibles Sensory or self-stimulatory Tienet lists a bunch of options and separates them into confusing categories. KEEP IT SIMPLE If Timmy puts his hands over his ears when the fire alarm sounds. The function is ESCAPE from auditory sensation. Auditory itself, is not a function even though Tienet gives you that option. 12

13 + Target Behavior Function Example Situation: Amir cries when sitting and doing math problems. You have the option on tienet of choosing “emotion”. This option cannot be operationally defined and does not help you determine an intervention. The crying could be because the work is too hard (escape), OR The crying could be because the teacher comes over and asks her what is wrong (attention) KEEP IT SIMPLE. STICK TO THE 4 FUNCTIONS Escape, Attention, Access, Sensory 13

14 + Summary Hypothesis Statement This is the last part of the FBA and the first part of the PBSP or BIP. When this occurs, the student does this to get or avoid this Examples 1) When doing math work at a desk, Jasmine drops to the floor to avoid doing her work. 2) When sitting alone Jose whistles to get a teacher to give him attention. 14

15 + NOW BEGIN THE BIP/PBSP SUMMARY HYPOTHESIS STATEMENT begins the plan STRATGIES: Next there are a bunch of boxes that can be confusing. Try the following method to help you devise an intervention and then you can place the intervention into the appropriate boxes. 15

16 + Plan it out Antecedent Desired Behavior ReinforcementTarget Behavior Acceptable Alternative Behavior Reinforcement Alternative Antecedent Consequence (Function) 16

17 Setting EventAntecedent Strategies Taught Strategies Consequence Strategies Tienet provides you the table below to fill in Antecedent Alternative antecedent Acceptable alternative behavior Consequence and reinforcement Antecedent Desired Behavior ReinforcementTarget Behavior Acceptable Alternative Behavior Reinforcement Alternative Antecedent Consequence (Function) 17

18 Doing work at deskCompletes work Earns reward, gets needs met Drops to the floorUse break card Work is removed for a designated time, reintroduce work in a less demanding way and quickly provide reward Before math remind Jasmine to use her card at any time Prompt break then complete work because the function was escape Jasmine Example: When doing work at her desk, Jasmine drops to the floor to avoid doing work. 18

19 Setting EventAntecedent Strategies Taught StrategiesConsequence Strategies Jasmine doing math work at her desk. Before math and several times during math, remind Jasmine that she has a break card Using a break card, raising hand to ask for help If Jasmine drops to floor, she must complete her work. If she uses a break card, work is removed for a designated amount of time, work is made easier (e.g., help provided, presented in a different way, fewer problems),praise provided for asking for a break and reward given when work is completed. 19

20 Sitting alone at desk Social skills (appropriate waiting) AttentionWhistlesRaises hand Teacher attention and praise, give rewards for appropriate waiting (token economy) Role plays and peer modeling Ignore because the whistling was getting attention Jose Example: When sitting alone Jose whistles to get a teacher to give him attention. 20

21 Setting EventAntecedent Strategies Taught Strategies Consequence Strategies Jose is sitting alone at his desk. Role plays and peer modeling are used to show how attention can be obtained Teaching Jose to raise his hand instead of whistling If Jose whistles, ignore the whistling. When Jose raises his hand, teacher gives him attention and praise. A token economy will be used to reward for appropriate waiting and attention seeking. 21

22 + Implementation Activities Timeline Training/resources Person responsible 22

23 + Monitoring and Reporting Who will be responsible for monitoring progress and scheduling follow up meetings? How often will monitoring take place? 23

24 + THANK YOU And remember you are doing interventions all the time! A FBA and BIP/PBSP is a comprehensive way to communicate effective strategies so that our team will meet law requirements and stay consistent. It’s for the KIDS!!! 24


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