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CREATING A BEHAVIOR INTERVENTION PLAN Presenters: Kyla Weatherford, LSSP; Katherine Maddox, Ph.D., LSSP; & Teressa Feierabend, LSSP.

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Presentation on theme: "CREATING A BEHAVIOR INTERVENTION PLAN Presenters: Kyla Weatherford, LSSP; Katherine Maddox, Ph.D., LSSP; & Teressa Feierabend, LSSP."— Presentation transcript:

1 CREATING A BEHAVIOR INTERVENTION PLAN Presenters: Kyla Weatherford, LSSP; Katherine Maddox, Ph.D., LSSP; & Teressa Feierabend, LSSP

2 WHEN DO I DEVELOP A BIP? In the case of the student whose behavior impedes his or her learning or the learning of others, the ARD committee must consider A) Other strategies to address that behavior (you can add these on the accommodation page). B) The use of positive behavioral interventions and support (write a BIP like the one we are introducing today).

3 STUDENT 1

4 CHOOSING BEHAVIORS TO TARGET (I.E., INAPPROPRIATE BEHAVIORS) FOR THE BIP How do you choose which problems to focus on when writing a BIP? Prioritize! You cannot work on all problematic behaviors at once It is usually best to address 2-3 of target behaviors in the BIP for the following reason Choose the most significant behavior(s) which are creating the most severe problem(s) You may have to let another bothersome behavior go while working on a more severe one. Its ok. You can work on the others later. Behaviors which are the most dangerous, disruptive, or frequent are good starting points

5 OPERATIONALLY DEFINE TARGET BEHAVIOR An operational definition describes the behavior in terms of what you see. It is an explicit definition that two or more disinterested observers would be able to identify.

6 WHY IS AN OPERATIONAL DEFINITION NECESSARY? Three people will have three different ideas of what a meltdown is. To write I want her to stop having meltdowns doesnt explain what a meltdown is. Therefore, the behaviors should be identified: hitting, kicking, cursing, and crying may all be occurring when the student is having a meltdown, but another person may consider whining, pouting, a curled lip, banging fists on the desk and refusal to work to be a meltdown.

7 NON-OPERATIONAL VS. OPERATIONAL DEFINITIONS Is disruptive in class Refuses to work Says inappropriate things to other students Runs away Blurts out without being called upon when teacher is lecturing Sits and puts his head down when asked to write Says Youre a retard. Runs out of the classroom Non-Operational DefinitionOperational Definition

8 STUDENT 1 Off-task Not working, not completing assignments Continually asking if he can go to the resource room when in a gen. ed. class Out of seat Loud outbursts Off-task Not working, not completing assignments Continually asking if he can go to the resource room when in a gen. ed. class Out of seat Loud outbursts Off-task Not working, not completing assignments Continually asking if he can go to the resource room when in a gen. ed. class Out of seat Loud outbursts Off-task Not working, not completing assignments Continually asking if he can go to the resource room when in a gen. ed. class Out of seat Loud outbursts

9 REPLACEMENT BEHAVIORS What is a replacement behavior? It is the behavior you want the student to demonstrate rather than the behaviors he is currently demonstrating Replacement behaviors should… Be incompatible with the target behavior (behaviors cannot occur at the same time) Example: Target Behavior: Sally is blurting out without being called upon when teacher is lecturing Replacement Behavior Sallie will raise her hand and wait for the teacher to call upon her to answer

10 Complete Academic Assignments

11 FUNCTIONS OF BEHAVIOR WHY IS IS IMPORTANT TO KNOW THIS? Explain why the child is engaging in the behavior. ** So you can select a function-based intervention to address the behavior. Minimize the hit and miss approach.

12 FUNCTIONS OF BEHAVIOR ALL BEHAVIOR IS COMMUNICATION BEHAVIORS ONLY CONTINUE IF THEY ARE RESULTING IN REINFORCEMENT What we need to find out is: What does this behavior achieve for this student? What was obtained? What was avoided or escaped? 2 Basic functions of behavior: 1- To get something. For example- Gain a tangible item Get Attention Self-stimulating sensations 2- To avoid something or escape something. For example- Classwork Social situations

13 FUNCTIONS OF BEHAVIOR REMEMBER: A behavior can serve more than one function Example 1: Child has a tantrum because he wants a candy bar at the store (to gain a tangible)--- The same child has a tantrum because he does not want to clean his room (avoidance). You will need more than one intervention here to address both functions. *Interventions need to address the function. Example 2: A child spits because when he does, his teacher verbally reprimands and talks to him about why its wrong to spit in class (attention). Another child spits up in the air to receive reinforcement in the form of self-stimulation. If you do not know why the behavior is occurring, start collecting data.

14 FUNCTIONS: COLLECTING DATA Indirect Methods Interviews with those who know that student well Interview with the student Review records and documentation Grades, anecdotal notes, evaluations, history of discipline referrals, etc. Direct Method: observations/ABC approach

15 FUNCTIONS OF BEHAVIOR A-B-C Antecedent: the event or stimulus that occurs immediately before the behavior Behavior: operationalized target behavior Consequence: the event or stimulus that takes place after the occurrence of a behavior. Key: Determine what triggers the behavior and what consequences may be maintaining or reinforcing the behavior.

16 FUNCTIONS OF BEHAVIOR Questions to be asking… When does it happen? How often? Where does the behavior occur and where does it not occur? With whom? Is there a consistent pattern? Is it predictable? What did adults and peers do in response? What did the child gain/escape/avoid? Develop a hypothesis What are the possible reasons for the behavior? Manipulate the relevant antecedents and/or consequences to change behavior What replacement behaviors can be taught to the student that serve the same function?

17 LETS PRACTICE Identify the possible function: Your student tries to leave the room when the class is asked to get out their math books to complete an assignment. Your student starts screaming louder after the teacher prompted the student to be quiet. Your student climbs furniture when favorite toy is out of reach Your student runs out of the room when another student starts crying.

18 EXAMPLE: HAROLD The teacher asks Harold to complete the class assignment. Harold becomes physically and verbally aggressive. Possible function? Harold brings a toy from home and is playing with it when he should be working. The teacher takes the toy and Harold cusses an hits her, trying to get it back. Possible function? Harold always ignores his teacher when she asks him to do something. Possible function?

19 POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS: BEHAVIOR 1 Inappropriate Behavior: Physically aggressive inappropriate behavior with adults which include: Hitting, Kicking, Biting Functions of Behavior: Avoidance of non-desired task; Gain a Tangible Replacement Behaviors: Harold will keep hands/feet to himself. (No physical aggression)

20 POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS: BEHAVIOR 1 * Daily Point Sheet – provides positive reinforcement for demonstration of replacement behavior; provides ongoing progress monitoring data; gives student corrective feedback so he has an idea of how he is doing *Paraprofessional assistance for work completion. *Proximity control *Prompts by the teacher to keep working. *Maintain a highly structured setting. *Ensure academic demands match students instructional level. *Reinforce student each time he completes a task. Reinforcement should be 4 to 1 reinforcers to punishers.

21 CONSEQUENCES: BEHAVIOR 1 Loss of points on point sheet. Loss of access to rewards. Verbal Hassel Log Restitution

22 POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS: BEHAVIOR 2 Inappropriate Behavior: Verbally aggressive inappropriate behavior with adults which include: Cursing, Name calling, Threatening Functions of Behavior: Avoidance of non-desired task; Gain a Tangible Replacement Behaviors: Harold will refrain from cursing, name calling, and threatening others

23 POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS: BEHAVIOR 2 Daily Point Sheet – provides positive reinforcement for demonstration of replacement behavior; provides ongoing progress monitoring data; gives student corrective feedback so he has an idea of how he is doing Social Stories T-Charts Remain Calm and decreases voice volume to deescalate the situation

24 CONSEQUENCES: BEHAVIOR 2 Loss of points on point sheet. Loss of access to rewards. Hassel Log Restitution

25 POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS: BEHAVIOR 3 Inappropriate Behavior: Does not comply with adult request Functions of Behavior: Avoidance of adult directive Replacement Behaviors: Comply with adult directive within 1 min. with no more than two prompts.

26 POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORTS: BEHAVIOR 3 Give Harold access to the sensory strategies recommended by the OT Daily review the 5 Point Scale with Harold to ensure he knows how to use it properly Give Harold access to a Home Base for time to regroup when he appears upset or frustrated

27 CONSEQUENCES: BEHAVIOR 3 Loss of points on the point sheet. Loss of access to rewards


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