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Part 6: Behavior Support Team: Implementation & Evaluation Planning 1 Practical/Basic FBA.

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Presentation on theme: "Part 6: Behavior Support Team: Implementation & Evaluation Planning 1 Practical/Basic FBA."— Presentation transcript:

1 Part 6: Behavior Support Team: Implementation & Evaluation Planning 1 Practical/Basic FBA

2 Part 6: Behavior Support Team Participant Manual pages Review content from previous training sessions 1)Describe the role of the BSP Team Leader and team members 2)Define and describe how to assess contextual fit 3)Describe the necessary components of Implementation and Evaluation Plans TASK: Lead a team through Implementation & Evaluation of BSP

3 Review #1 Use the BSP Self-Check on p. 97 as a guide to check the Suggested Interventions and fill in missing interventions that address the function of behavior on the BSP form (p. 96) for Travis 10-minutes 3

4 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon C onsequence/Function Coach follows him and sometimes chases him (student thinks it is like a game of tag) Obtains attention from teacher A ntecedent Asked to participate in stretching exercises Setting Event Student hasn’t been to PE with “coach” for a week or more. Replacement Behavior Ask appropriately to help the coach Problem B ehavior Walks away from group or runs around the field yelling Consequence Stay with classmates; peer attention Routine: Physical Education Setting EventsManipulate AntecedentTeach BehaviorAlter Consequences Arrange for “coach” to check in with him before PE starts to ensure that he gets direct attention from “coach”. Prevent Problem Behavior When having students do stretching exercises provide student with a choice of stretching next to the coach or setting up the equipment for the next activity. Prompt Alternate/Desired Behavior Coach reminds him at the beginning of class that he may ask to be a helper at any time. Teach Replacement Behavior Coach will practice with the student how to ask to be a helper when he is wanting to get the coach’s attention Teach Desired Behavior Provide social skills training focused on how to participate with the class. Reinforce Replacement Behavior Student will be allowed to be a helper when he asks appropriately Reinforce Desired Behavior When student participates with class for 5-minutes, coach will go over and give him a hi-five. Corrective Procedures At first sign of problem behavior, student will be prompted by coach to ask to be a helper. Extinguish Problem Behavior Coach does not follow student or give any verbal attention to student when he is not participating Desired Behavior Participate with class in stretching exercises Travis

5 Review #2 (pg. 98) RACER?? R eplace problem behavior by teaching a socially acceptable, efficient behavior that allows student to obtain the pay-off/function A ntecedent strategies to directly address triggers to prevent problems & prompt replacement behaviors based on the function of behavior C orrect behaviors by quickly & effectively redirecting student to replacement behavior E xtinguish behaviors by ensuring that problem behaviors do NOT pay off for the student (i.e. does not result in the function of behavior) R einforce replacement & desired behaviors based on function/pay off for the student

6 REVIEW (p. 98) Steps in Behavior Support Planning Step 1: Develop Competing Behavior Pathway Step 2: Develop Behavior Support Plan Step 3: Implementation Plan Step 4: Evaluation Plan Step 5: Follow-up Meetings to Review Progress

7 Objectives Describe the role of the BSP Team Leader and team members Describe the necessary components of: – Implementation Planning and – Evaluation Plans

8 BSP Team & Implementation Planning 8

9 Steps in Behavior Support Planning Step 1: Develop Competing Behavior Pathway Step 2: Develop Behavior Support Plan Step 3: Implementation Plan Step 4: Evaluation Plan Step 5: Follow-up Meetings to Review Progress

10 BSP Team members & roles Standing Team Members *Principal & *Basic BSP Team Leader Members Based on Student Teachers & Staff who work w/ student (Gen Ed, SPED & staff as appropriate) Decision Maker & Monitor BSP Behavioral Training/ Case Manager & Facilitator Implementer w/ Knowledge of Student & Context for Intervention ***For more challenging cases, make sure to involve Behavior Specialist Behavioral Expertise/ Case Manager & Facilitator

11 Implementation Planning Meeting a)Summarize the Competing Behavior Pathway (Assessment results) b)Finalize Interventions for Implementation Plan c)Finalize Evaluation Plan 11

12 What you Need: Completed Behavior Support Plan 12 Step 1: Summarize the Competing Behavior Pathway Your Roadmap for Intervention Planning

13 13 Summarizing the Competing Behavior Pathway 1. Start by reviewing the FBA & assessment information 2. Here is a suggested Alternate Behavior (short term goal)… Will this work? Other ideas? 2. Here is a suggested Alternate Behavior (short term goal)… Will this work? Other ideas? 3. This is the long- term goal “Based on the FBA, which included assessments (interview, observation, etc.) with who? … we found the following information about Harrison’s problem behavior.” During Routine, Harrison is most likely to Problem Behavior, when Antecedent because he is Consequence, as a result he gets to Function. Remember the Alt. Beh must: -serve same function -be easier to do -be soc’ly acceptable Remember the Alt. Beh must: -serve same function -be easier to do -be soc’ly acceptable

14 Practice Activity Choose a Partner See the Competing Behavior Pathways on pp of your manual – Choose either your own BSP case you are working on or one of the examples (Travis or Lumen) provided in the manual Practice Presenting a Summary of the Competing Behavior Pathway to your Partner 14

15 Implementation Planning Meeting 1)Summarize the Competing Behavior Pathway (Assessment results) 2)Finalize Interventions for Implementation Plan 3)Finalize Evaluation Plan 15

16 Finalizing the Implementation Plan IMPORTANT!!! – Actively involve implementers in determining final interventions for Implementation – Specifically identify if the interventions work for the implementers If they DON’T… the intervention will NOT be implemented 16

17 Finalizing the Implementation Plan For each intervention being considered, ask your implementer: – Do you believe this intervention will be effective for the student? – Is this intervention consistent with your values as an educator? – Is this intervention feasible for you to implement? Do you have the skills needed? Are the necessary resources (time, space, staff, administrative support) available? 17

18 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon Implementation Planning: Who will do what, by when? Consider: What specific activities will be involved? Developing materials (ex. reinforcement system) Designing and teaching curriculum Data collection design Who is responsible for implementing each part of the intervention? When will each part of the plan be implemented?

19 Finalizing the Implementation Plan 19 What Who When

20 Manipulate AntecedentTeach BehaviorAlter Consequences Prevent problem behavior Provide visual prompts (graphic organizers) for math assignments. Intersperse easy problems with long division problems Prompt Alternate/Desired Behavior Put visual reminder on desk to prompt H to ask for a break or easier task Teach Replacement Behavior - Teach him how to appropriately ask for a ‘break’ or for an easier task and when (appropriate times) to do so Teach Desired Behavior: Academic/Social Skills - Provide additional small- group instruction in multi-digit multiplication and division Reinforce Behavior Every time he asks for a break respectfully make sure he gets a break. - For every 5 difficult math problems that he completes, he will be allowed to skip 5 problems Response to Problem Behavior/ Corrective Feedback & Extinction Procedures When student engages in problem behavior, prompt him to ask for a break. If student still engages in problem behavior, ensure he does not get out of task (he may have to do work with teacher during recess/after school) Finalizing the Implementation Plan Turning Suggested Interventions into an IMPLEMENTATION PLAN 20 Review the suggested interventions. This is why, this is what it looks like. If not, do you have suggestions for revisions or alternative interventions to prevent the problem behavior? 1)Do you think this would work? 2)Does it fit your values? 3)Is this feasible? 4)Are you clear about how to do this? Should we do this? What help/support would you need? 1)Do you think this would work? 2)Does it fit your values? 3)Is this feasible? 4)Are you clear about how to do this? Should we do this? What help/support would you need?

21 21 Manipulate Antecedent Prevent problem behavior Provide visual prompts (graphic organizers) for math assignments. Intersperse easy problems with long division problems Prompt Alternate/Desired Behavior Put visual reminder on desk to prompt H to ask for a break or easier task Provide graphic organizer for long division steps Mr. J 10/4 Give verbal/gestural reminders to take break Mr. J 10/4 Teacher Concern: “Not age appropriate, would verbal or gesture reminders work?” Teacher Concern: Teacher doesn’t think it’s necessary, instead teach student they can cross off difficult problems Teach student to cross off difficult problems & go on Mrs.M 10/4

22 Manipulate AntecedentTeach BehaviorAlter Consequences Prevent problem behavior Provide visual prompts (graphic organizers) for math assignments. Intersperse easy problems with long division problems Prompt Alternate/Desired Behavior Put visual reminder on desk to prompt H to ask for a break or easier task Teach Replacement Behavior - Teach him how to appropriately ask for a ‘break’ or for an easier task and when (appropriate times) to do so Teach Desired Behavior: Academic/Social Skills - Provide additional small- group instruction in multi-digit multiplication and division Reinforce Behavior Every time he asks for a break respectfully make sure he gets a break. - For every 5 difficult math problems that he completes, he will be allowed to skip 5 problems Response to Problem Behavior/ Corrective Feedback & Extinction Procedures When student engages in problem behavior, prompt him to ask for a break. If student still engages in problem behavior, ensure he does not get out of task (he may have to do work with teacher during recess/after school) Let’s Try this Together Role Play: You’re the teacher, this is your student & I’m presenting interventions to you 22 Review the suggested interventions. This is why, this is what it looks like. If not, do you have suggestions, revisions or alternative interventions? 1)Do you think this would work? 2)Does it fit your values? 3)Is this feasible? 4)Are you clear about how to do this? Should we do this? What help/support would you need? 1)Do you think this would work? 2)Does it fit your values? 3)Is this feasible? 4)Are you clear about how to do this? Should we do this? What help/support would you need? Remember Replacement Behaviors must: -Same Function -Easier -Soc’ly Approp. Remember Replacement Behaviors must: -Same Function -Easier -Soc’ly Approp.

23 23 Provide graphic organizer for long division steps Mr. J 10/4 Give verbal/gestural reminders to take break Mr. J 10/4 Teach student to cross off difficult problems & go on Mrs.M 10/4 On p. 104 Document our final Teaching interventions here

24 Partner Activity (pp ) With a Partner (1 person = teacher/ implementer; 1 person = BSP team leader) Confer on suggested interventions below & Finalize consequence interventions – Document finalized interventions on Implementation Plan on p Review the suggested interventions. This is why, this is what it looks like. If not, do you have suggestions for revisions or alternative interventions? 1)Do you think this would work? 2)Does it fit your values? 3)Is this feasible? 4)Are you clear about how to do this? Should we do this? What help/support would you need? 1)Do you think this would work? 2)Does it fit your values? 3)Is this feasible? 4)Are you clear about how to do this? Should we do this? What help/support would you need?

25 25 Provide graphic organizer for long division steps Mr. J 10/4 Give verbal/gestural reminders to take break Mr. J 10/4 Teach student to cross off difficult problems & go on Mrs.M 10/4 What did you come up with for Final Consequence Interventions?

26 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon Training Staff How to Implement the BSP The plan will not be implemented if: – Staff don’t understand how to do it or… – If the plan is not working because the intervention is being used incorrectly Plan times for Modeling/Roleplay and Feedback to ensure that staff understand how to implement BSP strategies Plan for frequent Follow-ups to provide feedback, help problem solve, and ensure that intervention is being used as designed Ex. “check-in”, along with periodic visits/observations

27 Implementation Planning Meeting 1)Summarize the Competing Behavior Pathway (Assessment results) 2)Finalize Interventions for Implementation Plan 3)Finalize Evaluation Plan 27

28 Evaluation Plan 28 The team identifies: - Short-term goal - Long-term goal - Specific evaluation procedures - Date to meet and evaluate the effectiveness of the plan

29 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon Use Competing Behavior Pathway to Identify Goals Typical Consequence Maintaining Consequence Desired Behavior Problem Behavior Alternate Behavior Antecedent Setting Event Routine: Long-term goal Increase Desired Beh. Short-term goal Reduce Problem Behavior Increase Alt. Behavior

30 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon Evaluation Planning: Short- and Long- term Goals Short-term goal – Focus on increasing student’s use of the identified alternative behavior & reductions in problem behavior Use baseline data to develop a REASONABLE initial goal that student will be able to achieve Short term goal will continuously be revised, gradually working toward the long-term goal Long-term goal – Focus on desired behavior & sustained reductions in problem behavior Begin by reinforcing approximations of desired behavior

31 Example Goals Behavioral Goals (Use specific, observable, measurable descriptions of goal) What is the short-term behavioral goal? During Writing, Leroy will ask appropriately for an easier task or for a “break” from difficult tasks without throwing materials or cursing at least 75% of the time as measured by a daily point card. Leroy will complete at least 50% of his assigned work (with support) in his writing class; measured by review of work collected. _2/15___ Expected date What is the long-term behavioral goal? Leroy will complete at least 80% of his assigned work in his writing class with no more than 3 incidences of problem behavior (throwing materials, cursing) for one month. __5/1____ Expected date During Writing class, Leroy is currently engaging in problem behavior (throwing materials and cursing) to escape difficult tasks in writing approximately 3 days per week. On average, he is completing only 25-30% of his work in writing class. Short-term goal Increase Alt. Behavior & Reduce Problem Behavior + Approximation toward Desired Behavior Long-term goal Increase Desired Behavior & Reduce Problem Behavior

32 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon In addition to long- and short-term goals, the evaluation plan includes the specific data that will be collected to assess: #1. Is the plan being implemented as designed? #2. Is the plan making an impact on student behavior? Evaluation Planning: How Will We MEASURE Progress?

33 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon Ask approp’ly for break/ easier task Use Respectful Language Use materials appropriately LeRoy Feb. 4 th Measure Decrease in Problem Behavior through focus on Expected Behaviors Increase in Alternate Behavior Measuring the Short-term Goal During Writing, Leroy will ask appropriately for an easier task or for a “break” from difficult tasks without throwing materials or cursing at least 75% of the time as measured by a daily point card.

34 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon Considerations When Developing Evaluation Measures Does the measure capture the specific tasks/target behaviors of interest? – Is the plan being implemented? Did I implement the plan? vs. Did I check in with student and provide specific praise when she entered class? – Is the plan making a difference? Was it a “good” or “bad” day? vs. How many talk-outs occurred during Spanish class today?

35 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon Balancing Accuracy and Feasibility Are implementers consulted/included when designing measures? How often will data need to be collected? How much time, effort will data collection methods require? Does this “fit” the context/setting? Are there forms that staff are already using (ex. point cards) that can be modified/used?

36 Your Turn: Partner Activity (p. 107) Write a Short-Term Goal for Harrison Identify your Short-term Goals – Increase use of Alternative Behavior – Reduce Problem Behavior – Increase approximations of the Desired Behavior 36

37 Partner Activity (p. 107) Develop an Evaluation plan for Harrison Use the Competing Behavior Pathway to: a)Develop Short-Term Goals for evaluating Harrison’s progress Increase use of Alt. Beh/ Decrease in Problem Behavior/ Increase in Desired Behavior b)Develop a Data Collection plan for evaluating Harrison’s progress Use the point card provided on p. 107 Describe any additional data collection methods you might use 37

38 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon Example: Evaluation Procedures Data to be CollectedProcedures for Data Collection Person Responsible Timeline Is plan being implemented? -Modified assignments -Verbal prompts -Rewards for app. behavior -Response to prob. behavior Check in with Miss Posey (SPED) for modified assignments Collect daily-task checklists Mrs. Ryan Mrs. Foster Implement as of 2/27 Daily for 2 weeks Collect 3 x per week Is plan making a difference? -# of tantrums/ week -Student use of hand-raising to request escape -# math problems completed in class/ total problem Teacher notes # of occurrences per week in math Teacher notes daily on behavior report card Teacher grade book / permanent products Mrs. Ryan Mrs. Foster Implement 2/27 Check in 3 x per week Daily for 2 weeks Weekly Plan Review Date 3/14/05

39 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon Questions Yes ( every day this week) Kind of ( 2-3 days this week) No ( 0 days This week) Notables * 1. At the beginning of class, and before transitions, did I remind the students that I would be looking for star behaviors? 2. Did I provide at least one extra reminder, before transitions or difficult tasks, to my target students? 3. Did I pair specific praise with stars at a ratio of 4 praise statements to every 1 redirect? 4. Did I use my target students as positive examples? 5. Did my target students meet their 5 star goal? 6. Did I catch my target students early in the lesson / class? 7. Did the class earn extra recess, choice time, etc. after meeting the star goal? TOTALS Example: Implementer Checklist

40 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon Meeting to Review the Plan

41 Steps in Behavior Support Planning Step 1: Develop Competing Behavior Pathway Step 2: Develop Behavior Support Plan Step 3: Implementation Plan Step 4: Evaluation Plan Step 5: Follow-up Meetings to Review Progress

42 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon BSP Review Meeting Review data for each component of the plan to determine: 1.The extent to which each strategy is being implemented 2. If the plan is making a difference/if progress is being made 3. If the data indicate that the plan needs to be modified and how? 4. The date of the next review meeting

43 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon If Yes: Great job! If No: – Do implementers understand how and when to use strategies? – Are strategies feasible in the natural setting? – Are there ways that plan can be modified to make implementation more likely? Is the Plan Being Implemented? *Note: If the plan is not being implemented with fidelity, we can not assess if the plan is working.

44 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon Is the Plan Making a Difference? If Yes: Great! And… Have criteria been met? – If No: Keep monitoring – If Yes: Modify goal? Increase self-monitoring? Begin gradually fading antecedent supports? Begin gradually fading or modifying rewards? If No: Then… Is plan being implemented? – If NO: Focus on implementation – If Yes: Is student consistently being rewarded for alt/des behavior? How often? Are reinforcers for alt/des behavior “strong” enough? Is problem behavior still being rewarded?

45 M.K. Strickland-Cohen (2011) ECS, University of Oregon 7 8 The Implementation Plan is used to record: : 3/21/11 1. The extent to which the plan is being implemented and… 2. Team evaluation decisions made, based on the data presented at the meeting Add more multi-digit problems Monitor Completed/ Discontinue Monitor

46 Task Over the next weeks… 1.Lead your team through Implemention & Evaluation of a Behavior Support Plan for your student FBA case at your school 46

47 Check #1 When finalizing the implementation plan it is important to actively involve who? in determining final interventions for Implementation 47

48 Check #2 When developing Short-term goals Goals should Focus on what 3 things? 1) Increasing use of the identified Alternative Behavior 2) Reductions in Problem Behavior 3) Increasing approximations of the Desired Behavior 48

49 Key Points from Session #6 49

50 Comments/Questions about Session #6 Please write any comments/questions you may have pertaining to this session. Thank you for your time & attention! 50


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