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Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals Exceptional Children Division Policy, Monitoring, and Audit Section.

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Presentation on theme: "Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals Exceptional Children Division Policy, Monitoring, and Audit Section."— Presentation transcript:

1 Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals Exceptional Children Division Policy, Monitoring, and Audit Section

2 2 Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals How the child’s progress toward meeting each annual goal will be measured. Reports on the child’s progress toward meeting each annual goal will be provided concurrent with the issuance of report cards, or more often as determined by the IEP Team. [ NC (3)(i)(ii)]  Example: Student may have two academic goals and one behavioral goal.  IEP Team decides progress on the behavioral goal will be provided every two weeks.

3 3 The method used to measure progress must: 1.Measure the skill stated in the annual goal; 2.Yield accurate data regarding that skill; 3.Provide clear evidence of progress (or lack of progress) toward attaining the annual goal; 4.Use language the parent can understand; and 5.Pass the stranger test, i.e. A stranger can pick up the IEP, read the annual goal, read how progress will be measured, and know what to do without asking any questions. Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals

4 4 Jordan will grow six inches in one calendar year. Dad Uses observation to measure Jordan's progress. Tells pediatrician Jordan is on track to meet goal. Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals

5 5 Nathan will grow six inches in one calendar year. Dad  Uses observation, along with other tools;  Makes mark on wall;  Writes the measurement and today's date on the wall; and  Tells pediatrician the exact number of inches Nathan has grown since the last measurement. Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals

6 Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals When well-written evaluation criteria are stated in objective, measurable terms in the annual goals, how progress will be measured flows naturally from the goal statement. Adapted from the National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY) 6

7 What is in a name? That which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet; -Juliet to Romeo William Shakespeare What is in a name? That which we call a rose By any other name would smell as sweet; -Juliet to Romeo William Shakespeare 7 Responsiveness to Instruction Curriculum-Based Measurements Formative Assessment

8 Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals What is progress monitoring?  Assessing a student's academic and/or behavioral performance, using brief measures, on a frequent basis.  Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) is the scientifically validated form of progress monitoring. Data-Based Instruction in Special Education Douglas Fuchs and Lynn S. Fuchs Vanderbilt University 8

9 Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals CBM is:  A specific approach to measuring student learning;  Repeated measurements - weekly or monthly - across extended periods of time;  Equivalent forms of the same task;  Reliable and valid;  Easy to administer;  Time efficient; and  Effective - provides functional information. 9

10 Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals CBM is:  Backed by 30 years of sound research.  Evaluates the success of the instruction the child is receiving.  Results in scores easy to understand - no need for interpretation.  For example, the number of words correctly pronounced in a one-minute reading. 10

11 Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals How does progress monitoring work?  Determine student's current level.  Identify goal for learning that will take place over time.  Measure on a regular basis (weekly or monthly).  Compare expected and actual rates of learning.  Adjust teaching based on the measurements in order to meet individual needs of student. 11

12 Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals When progress monitoring is implemented correctly, the benefits are great for everyone involved. Some benefits include:  Accelerated learning because students are receiving more appropriate instruction;  Informed instructional decisions;  Documentation of student progress;  More efficient communication with families and other professionals about students’ progress; and  Higher expectations for students by teachers. 12

13 Graphs can:  Provide clear visual representation of progress over time.  Increase productive communication at IEP meetings.  Be used to develop more appropriate goals.  Provide solid information to easily share with new teachers and administrators.  Enable students to keep track of their own progress.  Result in motivating students to work more diligently toward their goals. 13 Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals

14 11/25/11 Baseline: 75 wpm with 95% accuracy Measurable annual goal:  Given a 2 nd grade reading passage, Kara will read 150 wpm with 95% accuracy over five consecutive sessions. How progress will be measured:  Kara will read orally for one minute each week.  The teacher (or other appropriately trained adult) will observe and document the number of words and errors. 14

15 Determine the rate needed for Kara to reach her goal before making the final decision.  75 WPM Baseline (present level)  150 WPM Goal  27 Number of instructional weeks left in the school year 150 – 75 = ÷ 27 = 2.78 To meet the goal, Kara will need to increase the wpm by 2.78 words each week while maintaining 95% accuracy 15 Measuring and Reporting Progress Toward Measurable Annual Goals

16 16 Make instructional change Goal line Trend line Kara: Baseline 75 Goal instructional weeks left in the school year Needs to gain 2.78 wpm each week

17 17 Goal line Trend line May consider raising goal or leaving as is since trend and goal lines are close together and some weeks she has only increased her wpm by 2.0 Kara: Baseline 75 Goal instructional weeks left in the school year Needs to gain 2.78 wpm each week

18 Report on Progress 02/03/12 Goal: Given a 2 nd grade reading passage, Kara will read 150 wpm with 95% accuracy. Good progress. Sufficient to meet goal by end of school year. Report on Progress 02/03/12 Goal: Given a 2 nd grade reading passage, Kara will read 150 wpm with 95% accuracy. 11/25/11: 75 wpm 02/03/12: 102 wpm No regression over winter break! At this rate, she should meet her goal by the end of the school year. 18 Meets requirements Goes beyond dotting the i’s and crossing the t’s. Gives parent objective information about child’s progress.

19 In Summary After developing a present level of academic achievement and functional performance that contains information/data used to establish a baseline; and After developing a measurable annual goal; The IEP Team must determine how progress toward attaining the goal will be measured using an objective, reliable, and valid method of measurement.

20 Then teachers and related services providers must: 20 Measure on each student's progress toward attaining his/her annual goals. Report Monitor & Record

21 Progress Monitoring is Not Exclusive to RtI K Housing Market New Child Blood Pressure MLB 2011 Homeruns Heart Rate

22 22 Questions??


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