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AP US History Chapters 6 & 7.  Essential Question #1 How did the events of the French and Indian War foreshadow the Revolutionary War?

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Presentation on theme: "AP US History Chapters 6 & 7.  Essential Question #1 How did the events of the French and Indian War foreshadow the Revolutionary War?"— Presentation transcript:

1 AP US History Chapters 6 & 7

2  Essential Question #1 How did the events of the French and Indian War foreshadow the Revolutionary War?

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4  Unofficial British policy of relaxed royal control over colonial trade and only weak enforcement of Navigation Laws.  Began in Glorious Revolution  Ended in French and Indian War  Why would Salutary Neglect be a cause of the American Revolutionary War?

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6  Native Americans defeated Braddock and took to warpath- from frontier Penn to N. Carolina  Treaty of Paris was harsh for Iroquois, Creeks, and other interior tribes  Indians lost their most powerful diplomatic weapon- playing European powers against each other  Pontiac’s Uprising and the Proclamation of 1763

7  Colonists had increased confidence in their military strength  Shattered the myth of British invincibility  British officials upset by the reluctance of colonists’ support  Those colonists who fought together discovered that they were all fellow Americans- same language, shared common ideals  F & I caused colonists to develop a new vision of their destiny

8  Essential Question #2 Did the colonists have a strong argument for revolting against the crown, or were they simply overreacting?

9  Two new political ideas that developed among American colonists by the mid 1700s.  Republicanism  A society in which all citizens give in to their interests for the common good  Opposed aristocracies and monarchs  Radical Whigs  British political commentators, widely read by the colonists  Whigs feared power of the monarch threatened liberties  Americans are used to running their own affairs  “Distance weakens authority”

10  Mercantilism  Economic wealth could be measured by the amount of gold and silver the country has  To get more gold and silver, must export more than import  Colonies will provide raw materials to Britain (exports)  Britain to American colonies- “do not indulge in dreams of economic self-sufficiency or self- government”

11  Navigation Law (1650)- remember??  All commerce to and from the colonies must be on British ships  European goods headed to colonies must pass through Britain first  American merchants must send tobacco exclusively to Britain  And another thing…  British crown reserved the right to nullify (cancel) any laws passed by the colonial assemblies that worked against the mercantilist system

12  Was the British mercantilist system selfish and oppressive?  Most of these new laws were not strictly enforced  John Hancock and smuggling  Americans benefitted from mercantile system  Virginia planters had monopoly in the British market  Colonists had protection from British navy and army  Problems  Annoying liabilities and dependency on British creditors  Colonists felt used, economy held back by the British

13  Britain accumulated debt from F & I War  P.M. George Grenville’s plan  Enforce the Navigation Laws  Sugar Act of 1764 (increased tax from W. Indies)  Quartering Act of 1765  Stamp Tax of 1765 (to support the new military)  Admiralty courts  Reactions  Jeopardizing basic rights of the colonists  Radical whigs were right!  “no taxation w/o representation” vs. “virtual representation”

14  Colonial steps toward unity  Stamp Act Congress of 1765 (little impact in America)  Nonimportation agreements against British goods  Sons/Daughters of Liberty- more violent  Repeal of the Stamp Act  All stamp agents had been forced to resign, no one to sell the stamps  Repealed in pressure from thousands of British laborers losing jobs  Victory! But wait a minute….  Declaratory Act: Britain to America- “We own you.”

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16  Townshend Acts of 1767  Light import tax on glass, white lead, paper, pain, tea  Tax would pay salaries of royal governors and judges  Smuggling became common, British troops enter Boston (1768)  Would be repealed in 1770  Boston Massacre (March 5, 1770)  11 citizens wounded or killed, Crispus Attucks  Only 2 redcoats found guilty

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18  Samuel Adams  Engineer or rebellion  Established the Committee of Corr. in Boston (1772)  Comm. Of Corr.  Chief function was to spread the spirit of resistance by exchanging letters, oppose British policies  Every colony had established Comm. Of Corr.

19  Background  British East India Company facing bankruptcy  Cheaper tea, but principle more important  None of the tea ever reached America shores  Mass. Gov. Thomas Hutchinson  Reaction  Sympathetic colonists cheered  Conservatives complained  Hutchinson- gone

20  Parliament responds to Boston Tea Party  Boston Port Act and “Intolerable Acts”  Restrictions on town meetings  New Quartering Act  Quebec Act  Parliament’s decision on the French  Guaranteed Catholic religion, old customs  No representative assemblies or trial by jury  Extended providence of Quebec into Ohio River

21  First Continental Congress (1774)  Response to the “Intolerable Acts”  Address colonial grievances, NOT calling for independence  Declaration of Rights  The Association  Complete boycott of British goods  Lexington and Concord (April 1775)  British mission- seize colonial gunpowder and find Sam Adams and John Hancock

22  Strengths  Population (3-1)  Wealth  Naval power  Professional army, Hessians, Loyalists, Indians  Weaknesses  Ireland and France  Lord North was no William Pitt  English Whigs cheered American victories  Army had many difficulties  3,000 miles away from home  America’s geography

23  Strengths  Leadership- Washington and Franklin  Foreign Aid  Fighting a defensive war  Agriculture was self-sustaining  Belief in the cause  Weaknesses  Badly organized  Sectional jealousy  Economic difficulties

24 Which of these protests against the Stamp Act was most effective in securing its repeal? A. The Stamp Act Congress if 1765 B. Petitions to Parliament C. Nonimportation agreements D. Violent protests E. Refusal to pay the tax

25 Which of these protests against the Stamp Act was most effective in securing its repeal? A. The Stamp Act Congress if 1765 B. Petitions to Parliament C. Nonimportation agreements D. Violent protests E. Refusal to pay the tax

26  What was the most significant role of the Committees of Correspondence? A. Writing broadsides B. Encouraging women’s participation in boycotts and rebellions C. Building momentum for a complete break with England D. Seeking every colony’s participation in the first American Congress E. Organizing local letter-writing campaigns to fortify colonial resistance to British policies

27  What was the most significant role of the Committees of Correspondence? A. Writing broadsides B. Encouraging women’s participation in boycotts and rebellions C. Building momentum for a complete break with England D. Seeking every colony’s participation in the first American Congress E. Organizing local letter-writing campaigns to fortify colonial resistance to British policies

28  The First Continental Congress met in 1774 principally to A. Strategize ways to redress colonial grievances B. Declare the colony’s independence from England C. Outline a new national government for the future United States D. Organize a colonial army E. Enlist the support of other countries in their conflict with England

29  The First Continental Congress met in 1774 principally to A. Strategize ways to redress colonial grievances B. Declare the colony’s independence from England C. Outline a new national government for the future United States D. Organize a colonial army E. Enlist the support of other countries in their conflict with England

30 In what ways did mercantilism benefit the colonists? A. England provided subsidies for surplus crops B. Mercantilism helped several colonial merchants become wealthy C. It elevated some colonists to positions of political power D. It stimulated American wool manufacturing E. Britain granted them certain trade monopolies and protected them militarily

31 In what ways did mercantilism benefit the colonists? A. England provided subsidies for surplus crops B. Mercantilism helped several colonial merchants become wealthy C. It elevated some colonists to positions of political power D. It stimulated American wool manufacturing E. Britain granted them certain trade monopolies and protected them militarily

32 Which of the following lists is chronologically accurate? A. Stamp Act, Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts, Townshend Acts B. Sugar Act, Boston Massacre, The Association, Intolerable Acts C. Stamp Act, Boston Tea Party, Lexington and Concord, First Continental Congress D. Sugar Act, Townshend Acts, Boston Tea Party, First Continental Congress E. Declaratory Act, Quebec Act, Boston Massacre, Quartering Act

33 Which of the following lists is chronologically accurate? A. Stamp Act, Boston Tea Party, Intolerable Acts, Townshend Acts B. Sugar Act, Boston Massacre, The Association, Intolerable Acts C. Stamp Act, Boston Tea Party, Lexington and Concord, First Continental Congress D. Sugar Act, Townshend Acts, Boston Tea Party, First Continental Congress E. Declaratory Act, Quebec Act, Boston Massacre, Quartering Act

34  Essential Question #2 Did the colonists have a strong argument for revolting against the crown, or were they simply overreacting?


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