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Chapter 7 The Road to Revolution, 1763 – 1775. The Deep Roots of Revolution Two ideas had taken root in the minds of the American colonists Republicanism.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter 7 The Road to Revolution, 1763 – 1775. The Deep Roots of Revolution Two ideas had taken root in the minds of the American colonists Republicanism."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter 7 The Road to Revolution, 1763 – 1775

2 The Deep Roots of Revolution Two ideas had taken root in the minds of the American colonists Republicanism “Radical Whigs” Argued against patronage and corruption of the monarchy and aristocracy

3 Mercantilism and Colonial Grievances The original thirteen, except Georgia, were not formally founded by the British crown Mercantilism – the British theory that justified their control over the colonies Raw materials and a guaranteed market

4 The Navigation Law of 1650 Regulation for the colonies

5 The Merits and Menace of Mercantilism Benefits to the colonies Liberal bounties to colonial producers of ship parts Virginia tobacco monopoly Protection of the English navy and army

6 Burden to the colonies Dependency on British creditors Trade limitations American colonists felt used

7 The Stamp Tax Uproar Prime Minister George Grenville 1763 – Ordered the British navy to enforce the Navigation Laws The Sugar Act of 1764 Increased duty on foreign sugar

8 The Quartering Act of 1765 Colonies provide food and quarters for British troops The Stamp Act of 1765 Stamps were on certain types of commercial and legal documents “No taxation without representation’’

9 Parliament Forced to Repeal the Stamp Act The Stamp Act Congress, 1765 Step towards inter- colonial unity Nonimportation Agreements Sons of Liberty and Daughters of Liberty

10 The Townshend Tea Tax and the Boston “Massacre” “Champagne Charley’’ Townshend passes the Townshend Acts in 1767 Import duty on glass, white lead, paper, paint, and tea

11 British troops sent to the colonies in 1768 March 5, 1770 – the Boston Massacre Crispus Attucks

12 The Seditious Committees of Correspondence Lord North persuaded Parliament to repeal the Townshend revenue duties Samuel Adams organizes the local committees of correspondence Formed to spread the spirit of resistance

13 Tea Parties at Boston and Elsewhere 1773 – the British East India Company faced bankruptcy The royal ministry awarded the company a complete monopoly of the American tea business December 16, 1773 – the Boston Tea Party

14 Parliament Passes the “Intolerable Acts” 1774 – the Boston Port Act Closed the harbor until damages were paid Restrictions on town meetings 1774 – the Quebec Act The French-Canadians were guaranteed their Catholic religion their old customs and institutions

15 The Continental Congress and Bloodshed The First Continental Congress in representatives from 12 colonies meet in Philadelphia Deliberated for seven weeks The Association Called for a complete boycott of British goods

16 April 1775 – the British commander in Boston sends to Lexington and Concord The “Minute Men’’ and the “Lexington Massacre’’ Concord and the retreat to Boston

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18 Imperial Strength and Weakness Strength Larger population Professional military Monetary wealth

19 Weakness British troops needed around the globe Britons had no desire to kill their American cousins Lack of capable leaders Large distance from home Lack of food


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