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The Great Triumvirate Clay, Calhoun, & Webster. Between 1812 and 1850 had more impact on American government than any three politicians in American history.

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Presentation on theme: "The Great Triumvirate Clay, Calhoun, & Webster. Between 1812 and 1850 had more impact on American government than any three politicians in American history."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Great Triumvirate Clay, Calhoun, & Webster

2 Between 1812 and 1850 had more impact on American government than any three politicians in American history. none were ever elected president they left a lasting legacy on American politics – more presidents of their day could match. The Great Triumvirate Henry ClayJohn C Calhoun Daniel Webster

3 Henry Clay Born 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia Studied law in Richmond Joined the Bar in 1797 and moved to Lexington, Kentucky

4 Clay’s Political Career Nov 1806 – March 1807 – appointed to U.S Senate to fill an unexpired term, even though he was not the required age of 30. Jan March 1811 – Filled another unexpired term in Senate from March 1811 – Jan 1814 – served as Speaker of the House – Commissioner to negotiate treaty to end War of 1812

5 Clay’s Political Career March 1815 – March 1825 – served as Speaker of the House – created the American System and the Missouri Compromise – Secretary of State for J.Q. Adams 1831 – 1842 – U.S. Senate – created the compromise tariff to end the Nullification Crisis 1849 – 1852 – U.S. Senate – created the Compromise of 1850

6 Clay for President Election of 1824 – Democratic-Republican – places 4 th – but helps decide the election as Speaker of the House Election of 1832 – Whig – against Jackson – supports the Bank, loses Election of 1844 – Whig – against James K. Polk, – does not support the annexation of Texas, loses

7 “I’d rather be right than president” - Henry Clay

8 The Great Compromiser

9 John C. Calhoun Born in 1782 in Abbeville, South Carolina Graduated from Yale Became a lawyer

10 Calhoun’s Political Career 1811 – Nov – House member – Secretary of War for James Monroe 1825 – 1829 – Vice-President for J.Q. Adams 1829 – 1832 – Vice-President for Jackson – issues Doctrine of Nullification, resigns in Dec 1832

11 Calhoun’s Political Career 1832 – 1843 – U.S. Senate from South Carolina 1844 – 1845 – Secretary of State for Tyler 1845 – 1850 – U.S. Senate – Compromise of 1850 argued to support slavery and the rights of slave holders in the debates over the, dies before the final votes on the parts of the Compromise make it law.

12 “In looking back, I see nothing to regret and little to correct.” - John C. Calhoun

13 Champion of State’ Rights

14 Daniel Webster 1782 born in Salisbury, New Hampshire Graduated from Dartmouth College Admitted to the Bar in 1805

15 Webster’s Political Career 1813 – 1817 –Represented New Hampshire in the U.S. House 1816 –Moved to Boston, Massachusetts to pursue his legal career 1823 – 1827 –Represented Massachusetts in the U.S. House 1827 – 1841 –Represents Mass. in the Senate –spoke against nullification in the Webster-Hayne Debates 1836 –Runs for president as a Whig, loses to Van Buren

16 1841 – 1843 –Secretary of State for W.H. Harrison then Tyler, –Webster-Ashburton Treaty, 1842, settled the boundary between Maine and Canada 1845 – 1850 –Senate –supported the Compromise of 1850 against the wishes of his supporters 1850 – 1852 –Secretary of State for Fillmore –Known as one of the best orators of his day, school children memorized parts of his speeches for generations Webster’s Political Career

17 Webster and the Supreme Court Argued 171 cases before the U.S. Supreme Court –People packed the courtroom to hear him when he was arguing a case Dartmouth College v. Woodward –made contracts more secure McCulloch v. Maryland –defended the Bank of the U.S. and won Gibbons v. Ogden –defended Gibbons and supported the idea that transportation is part of commerce

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19 Defender of the Union


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