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Manchester Public Schools August 29, 2007 25 Industrial Park Road, Middletown, CT 06457-1520 · (860) 632-1485.

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Presentation on theme: "Manchester Public Schools August 29, 2007 25 Industrial Park Road, Middletown, CT 06457-1520 · (860) 632-1485."— Presentation transcript:

1 Manchester Public Schools August 29, Industrial Park Road, Middletown, CT · (860)

2 Academic SystemsBehavioral Systems 1-5% 5-10% 80-90% Intensive, Individual Interventions Individual Students Assessment-based High Intensity Intensive, Individual Interventions Individual Students Assessment-based Intense, durable procedures Targeted Group Interventions Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response Targeted Group Interventions Some students (at-risk) High efficiency Rapid response Universal Interventions All students Preventive, proactive Universal Interventions All settings, all students Preventive, proactive

3 Nonclassroom Setting Systems Classroom Setting Systems Individual Student Systems School-wide Systems

4 Challenging behavior Perception of noncompliance Look to “Control “or “Punish” Design/apply manipulative interventions to have power over student Maintain/increase challenging behaviors Student’s needs remain unaddressed (Knoster and Lapos, 1993)

5 Challenging behavior Perception of unmet needs Look to understand needs and develop hypothesis Design/deliver prevention/ intervention strategies based on hypothesis Reductions in challenging behaviors by learning alternative skills Meet needs in a more socially acceptable manner Personal growth improves self control Improved Quality of Life (Knoster and Lapos, 1993)

6 Proactive Reactive Preventative Stop something from occurring Act as a result Driven by circumstances Pre - planning and thinking Driven by values

7  Define Expectations  Set 3-5 overarching rules for all settings  State positively and succinctly  Teach Expectations  Make rules public  Articulate to students what is expected  Modeling what is expected  Practice, Practice, Practice  Reinforce Expectations  Catch students being good  Correct for non-compliance Knoster (2000)

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9  Establish expectations linked to school-wide expectations  Small number (3 to 5)  Positively stated  Connected to routines

10 Routines Rules Entering Classroom Seat Work Small Group Activity Leaving Classroom Be Safe Be Respectful Be Responsible Sugai & Simonsen (2006)

11 How can you use this tool to plan your classroom expectations?

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13 “If a child does not know how to read, we teach. If a child does not know how to swim, we teach. If a child does not know how to multiply, we teach. If a child does not know how to drive, we teach. If a child does not know how to behave, we teach?…punish? ” Tom Herner (NASDE President) Counterpoint, 1998

14  Teach expectations directly.  Define rule in operational terms—(what it looks like within routine)  Provide examples and non-examples  Actively involve students in lesson—game, role-play, etc.  Provide opportunities to practice in the natural setting. Sugai & Simonsen (2006)

15  Entering the classroom  Sharpening pencils  Walking in line, lining up procedures  Walking to the cafe  Turning in class work/homework  Going to bathroom, water fountain, etc.  Working in small groups  Work independently  Listening to teacher  Working in learning centers  Fire drills, library, assemblies  Getting materials  Entering the classroom after recess  Dismissal  Transitions

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17 Model Guided Practice Independent Practice

18  How do you teach your classroom expectations?  What is one example of a lesson?

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20  Contingent  Occur immediately after the behavior  Specific  Tell learner exactly what they are doing correctly or incorrectly  Brief (For Error Corrections)  After redirecting, move on Sugai & Simonsen (2006)

21  Instructional prompt  Offer a replacement behavior  Model or teach behavior  Nondirective Cue  Use a question to prompt  Directive Cue  State your request  State the time frame for compliance  State consequence. Mezzocchi, Michael. (2001) Managing Behavior. Pathway Staff Development

22 Instructional Prompt  The assumption is the student does not know the behavior, therefore an action is offered  Offer a replacement behavior  Model or teach behavior  Example: “Joseph, that’s arguing. Might asking Paul why he is laughing give you more accurate information?”. Mezzocchi, Michael. (2001) Managing Behavior. Pathway Staff Development

23 Nondirective Cue  The assumption is the student knows the behavior and needs cueing to use it  Use a question to prompt  Example: “Joseph, that’s arguing. What do you need to do if you think Paul is laughing at you? You need to make a good choice here.”. Mezzocchi, Michael. (2001) Managing Behavior. Pathway Staff Development

24 Directive Cue  The assumption is the student knows when and how to conduct the behavior and needs limit-setting  State your request  State the time frame for compliance  State consequence  Example: “Joseph, that’s arguing. You need to immediately stop (five to ten seconds) or you will be …(state the consequence).”. Mezzocchi, Michael. (2001) Managing Behavior. Pathway Staff Development

25  Defined  Discipline incidents that must be handled by the classroom teacher and usually do not warrant a discipline referral to the office  Purpose  To determine appropriate consequence and where the consequence should be delivered  These incidences are tracked

26  Defined  Discipline incidents that must be handled by the administration  Purpose  Once behaviors are operationally defined, it is essential that the team distinguish the major discipline incidents from the minor to determine the appropriate consequence

27 Lack of alignment with a school-wide PBS:  Inconsistent delivery of consequences across students, settings, and behaviors  Exclusionary practices that encourage further misbehavior through escape  Disproportionate amounts of staff time and attention to inappropriate behaviors  Miscommunication among staff, students, and parents Sugai & Simonsen (2006)

28  Keep it simple  Reward frequently (4:1)  Reward contingent on desired behavior  Refrain from threatening the loss of rewards or taking earned items or activities away  Provide opportunity to earn rewards throughout the day Sugai & Simonsen (2006)

29  What strategies do you use to handle consequences/rewards?  What do you anticipate being different with the implementation of PBS?

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31  Looking at behavior in context  Relationships  Environment conditions  Instructional conditions  Determining the motivation or function  Avoidance (What is avoided by the behavior?)  Gains (What is gained or achieved by the behavior?)

32  When is the behavior most/least likely to occur?  Where is the behavior most/least likely to occur?  With whom is the behavior most/least likely to occur?  What happens immediately before/after the behavior?  What do others do when the behavior occurs?  What other environmental and instructional conditions may contribute to the behavior? Pennsylvania Department of Education, Initial Line of Inquiry Gary LaVigna (2000) Behavioral Assessment and Advanced Support Strategies

33  Why is it important for us to know the function of behavior?  So we can understand why the behavior is occurring  To find an appropriate replacement behavior  To develop the best behavior support plan Kincaid (2004)

34  Lack of universal standards  Expectations are not clear or taught  Instructional match not met  Cultural differences

35 Context of learning What we teach Outcomes How we teach S tudent(s) I nstruction E nvironment C urriculum Adapted from Heartland Area Education Agency

36  Before the fact  What are the indicators/signs before the crisis behavior?  When, where, with whom is the behavior most likely to occur?  After the fact  Reconnect  Teach replacement behaviors or strategies  Teach coping techniques

37  Proactive  Change the environment to make behavior unnecessary  Instructional  Teach skills to make the behavior inefficient  Functional  Manage consequences to make behavior ineffective  Lifestyle  Support long-term quality of life outcomes for the student Kincaid (2004)

38 Prevent Environment Instruction & Curriculum Social/ Interpersonal Teach Strategies Skills & Concepts Respond Reinforcement Cueing & Feedback Management Adapted from Ayers

39  What contributes to effective intervention planning?  How can managing behaviors become more proactive?


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