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© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. In the nineteenth century, divorce by mutual consent was: 1.permitted in most European countries 2.not permitted in most.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. In the nineteenth century, divorce by mutual consent was: 1.permitted in most European countries 2.not permitted in most."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. In the nineteenth century, divorce by mutual consent was: 1.permitted in most European countries 2.not permitted in most European countries 3.permitted in France 4.permitted in Italy Q

2 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. In the nineteenth century, divorce by mutual consent was: 1.permitted in most European countries 2.not permitted in most European countries 3.permitted in France 4.permitted in Italy A

3 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: In the nineteenth century, divorce by mutual consent was: 2.not permitted in most European countries Divorce was difficult everywhere for most of the century. In England before 1857, each divorce required a separate act of Parliament. Thereafter, couples could divorce, with difficulty, through the Court of Matrimonial Causes. Most nations did not permit divorce by mutual consent E

4 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Most of the women filling service positions in the second half of the nineteenth century were: 1.young and unmarried 2.young and married 3.widows 4.from the working classes Q

5 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Most of the women filling service positions in the second half of the nineteenth century were: 1.young and unmarried 2.young and married 3.widows 4.from the working classes A

6 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Most of the women filling service positions in the second half of the nineteenth century were: 1.young and unmarried Most of the women filling the new service positions were young and unmarried. Upon marriage, or certainly after the birth of her first child, a woman normally withdrew from the labor force E

7 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The cult of domesticity most shaped the lives of: 1.working-class women 2.middle-class women 3.upper-class women 4.All of the above Q

8 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The cult of domesticity most shaped the lives of: 1.working-class women 2.middle-class women 3.upper-class women 4.All of the above A

9 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The cult of domesticity most shaped the lives of: 2.middle-class women For the middle classes, the distinction between work and family, defined by gender, had become complete and constituted the model for all other social groups. Middle-class women, if at all possible, did not work. More than any other women, they became limited to the roles of wife and mother E

10 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Europes most advanced womens movement was in: 1.France 2.Germany 3.Britain 4.Belgium Q

11 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Europes most advanced womens movement was in: 1.France 2.Germany 3.Britain 4.Belgium A

12 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Europes most advanced womens movement was in: 3.Britain Europes most advanced womens movement was in Britain. There, Millicent Fawcett (1847–1929) led the moderate National Union of Womens Suffrage Societies. She believed Parliament would grant women the vote only if it were convinced they would be respectable and responsible in their political activity E

13 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Anti-Semitism was resurgent in Europe in the: s and 1860s s s s and 1880s Q

14 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Anti-Semitism was resurgent in Europe in the: s and 1860s s s s and 1880s A

15 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Anti-Semitism was resurgent in Europe in the: s and 1880s Anti-Semitic voices began to be heard in the 1870s, attributing the economic stagnation of the decade to Jewish bankers and financial interests. In the 1880s, organized anti-Semitism erupted in Germany, as it did in France at the time of the Dreyfus affair E

16 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which of the following did NOT adopt a broad- based electoral system in the nineteenth century? 1.France 2.Germany 3.Russia 4.Spain Q

17 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which of the following did NOT adopt a broad- based electoral system in the nineteenth century? 1.France 2.Germany 3.Russia 4.Spain A

18 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Which of the following did NOT adopt a broad- based electoral system in the nineteenth century? 3.Russia Except for Russia, all the major European states adopted broad-based, if not perfectly democratic, electoral systems in the late nineteenth century E

19 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. French labor unions: 1.directed their political efforts towards the establishment of universal male suffrage 2.were often directly connected to socialist parties 3.were active in national politics 4.avoided active political participation Q

20 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. French labor unions: 1.directed their political efforts towards the establishment of universal male suffrage 2.were often directly connected to socialist parties 3.were active in national politics 4.avoided active political participation A

21 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: French labor unions: 4.avoided active political participation The French labor movement, with deep roots in anarchism, was uninterested in either politics or socialism. French workers usually voted socialist, but the unions themselves, unlike those in Britain, avoided active political participation E

22 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The leading advocate of Russias industrialization was: 1.Gregory Plekhanov 2.Alexander II 3.Nicholas I 4.Count Sergei Witte Q

23 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The leading advocate of Russias industrialization was: 1.Gregory Plekhanov 2.Alexander II 3.Nicholas I 4.Count Sergei Witte A

24 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The leading advocate of Russias industrialization was: 4.Count Sergei Witte Count Sergei Witte (1849–1915) led Russia into the industrial age. After a career in railways and other private business, he was appointed first minister of communications and then finance minister in Witte, who pursued a policy of planned economic development, protective tariffs, high taxes, putting Russias currency on the gold standard, and efficiency in government and business, epitomized the nineteenth-century modernizer E

25 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which of the following was NOT associated with the Second Industrial Revolution? 1.textiles 2.steel 3.chemicals 4.oil Q

26 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which of the following was NOT associated with the Second Industrial Revolution? 1.textiles 2.steel 3.chemicals 4.oil A

27 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Which of the following was NOT associated with the Second Industrial Revolution? 1.textiles The first Industrial Revolution was associated with textiles, steam, and iron; by contrast, the second was associated with steel, chemicals, electricity, and oil E

28 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Overall, the standard of living in the industrialized nations: 1.declined in the second half of the nineteenth century 2.improved in the second half of the nineteenth century 3.remained steady in the second half of the nineteenth century 4.went in to a steep decline in the second half of the nineteenth century Q

29 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Overall, the standard of living in the industrialized nations: 1.declined in the second half of the nineteenth century 2.improved in the second half of the nineteenth century 3.remained steady in the second half of the nineteenth century 4.went in to a steep decline in the second half of the nineteenth century A

30 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Overall, the standard of living in the industrialized nations: 2.improved in the second half of the nineteenth century Overall, however, the general standard of living in the industrialized nations improved in the second half of the nineteenth century. Both prices and wages, as well as profits, fell, so real wages generally held firm and even rose in some countries E

31 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Secretaries, retail clerks, and lower-level bureaucrats made up the: 1.solid middle class 2.petite bourgeoisie 3.new working class 4.gran bourgeoisie Q

32 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Secretaries, retail clerks, and lower-level bureaucrats made up the: 1.solid middle class 2.petite bourgeoisie 3.new working class 4.gran bourgeoisie A

33 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Secretaries, retail clerks, and lower-level bureaucrats made up the: 2.petite bourgeoisie A wholly new elementwhite-collar workers formed the lower middle class, or petite bourgeoisie. They included secretaries, retail clerks, and lower-level bureaucrats in business and government E

34 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Commercial development, railway construction, and slum clearance contributed to: 1.the development of suburbs 2.the entrenchment of the middle class in cities 3.the influx of new residents to city centers 4.the entrenchment of the poor in cities Q

35 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Commercial development, railway construction, and slum clearance contributed to: 1.the development of suburbs 2.the entrenchment of the middle class in cities 3.the influx of new residents to city centers 4.the entrenchment of the poor in cities A

36 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Commercial development, railway construction, and slum clearance contributed to: 1.the development of suburbs Commercial development, railway construction, and slum clearance displaced many city dwellers and raised urban land values and rents. Consequently, both the middle classes and the working class began to seek housing elsewhere. The result, in virtually all countries, was the development of suburbs surrounding the city proper E

37 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch, and Joseph Lister are associated with the: 1.bacterial theory of disease 2.theory of evolution 3.international socialist movement 4.resurgence of anti-Semitism Q

38 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch, and Joseph Lister are associated with the: 1.bacterial theory of disease 2.theory of evolution 3.international socialist movement 4.resurgence of anti-Semitism A

39 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Louis Pasteur, Robert Koch, and Joseph Lister are associated with the: 1.bacterial theory of disease Full acceptance at the close of the century of the bacterial theory of disease associated with the discoveries of Louis Pasteur (1822–1895) in France, Robert Koch (1843–1910) in Germany, and Joseph Lister (1827–1912) in Britain increased public concern about cleanliness E

40 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Nineteenth-century prostitution was closely tied to: 1.widespread legal reforms 2.the emergence of liberalism as a political force 3.less restrictive public mores 4.overcrowding in the female labor force Q

41 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Nineteenth-century prostitution was closely tied to: 1.widespread legal reforms 2.the emergence of liberalism as a political force 3.less restrictive public mores 4.overcrowding in the female labor force A

42 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Nineteenth-century prostitution was closely tied to: 4.overcrowding in the female labor force Prostitution was, of course, not new. It had always been one way for poor women to find income. In the late nineteenth century, however, it was closely related to the difficulty encountered by indigent women who were trying to make their way in an overcrowded female labor force E


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