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© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The nobility constituted about: 1.eight to ten percent of the population 2.one to five percent of the population 3.twenty.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The nobility constituted about: 1.eight to ten percent of the population 2.one to five percent of the population 3.twenty."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The nobility constituted about: 1.eight to ten percent of the population 2.one to five percent of the population 3.twenty to twenty-five percent of the population 4.one-third of the population Q

2 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The nobility constituted about: 1.eight to ten percent of the population 2.one to five percent of the population 3.twenty to twenty-five percent of the population 4.one-third of the population A

3 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The nobility constituted about: 2.one to five percent of the population The eighteenth century was the great age of the aristocracy. The nobility constituted approximately one to five percent of the population of any given country. Yet in every country, it was the single wealthiest sector of the population, had the widest degree of social, political, and economic power, and set the tone of polite society E

4 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The smallest, wealthiest, and best-defined aristocracy resided in: 1.Germany 2.Great Britain 3.France 4.Russia Q

5 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The smallest, wealthiest, and best-defined aristocracy resided in: 1.Germany 2.Great Britain 3.France 4.Russia A

6 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The smallest, wealthiest, and best-defined aristocracy resided in: 2.Great Britain The smallest, wealthiest, best defined, and most socially responsible aristocracy resided in Great Britain. It consisted of about four hundred families, and the eldest male members of each family sat in the House of Lords E

7 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. French nobles were divided between those of the robe and those: 1.of the sword 2.of the crown 3.of the land 4.of the blood Q

8 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. French nobles were divided between those of the robe and those: 1.of the sword 2.of the crown 3.of the land 4.of the blood A

9 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: French nobles were divided between those of the robe and those: a. of the sword In France, the approximately 400,000 nobles were divided between nobles of the sword, or those whose nobility was derived from military service, and those of the robe, who had acquired their titles either by serving in the bureaucracy or by having purchased them E

10 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. In many ways, the Russian nobility was created in the: 1.eighteenth century 2.tenth century 3.fifteenth century 4.fourteenth century Q

11 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. In many ways, the Russian nobility was created in the: 1.eighteenth century 2.tenth century 3.fifteenth century 4.fourteenth century A

12 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: In many ways, the Russian nobility was created in the: 1.eighteenth century In Russia, the eighteenth century saw what amounted to the creation of the nobility. Peter the Greats (r. 1682–1725) linking of state service and noble social status through the Table of Ranks (1722) established among Russian nobles a self-conscious class identity that had not previously existed E

13 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The economic basis of eighteenth-century life was: 1.regional trade 2.international trade 3.the land 4.manufacturing Q

14 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The economic basis of eighteenth-century life was: 1.regional trade 2.international trade 3.the land 4.manufacturing A

15 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The economic basis of eighteenth-century life was: 3.the land Land was the economic basis of eighteenth- century life and the foundation of the status and power of the nobility. Well over three- fourths of all Europeans lived in the country, and few of them ever traveled more than a few miles from their birthplace E

16 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. In eastern Europe: 1.few people married before the age of thirty 2.men usually married before the age of twenty 3.women usually married before the age of fifteen 4.both men and women usually married before the age of twenty Q

17 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. In eastern Europe: 1.few people married before the age of thirty 2.men usually married before the age of twenty 3.women usually married before the age of fifteen 4.both men and women usually married before the age of twenty A

18 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: In eastern Europe: 4.both men and women usually married before the age of twenty As one moved eastward across Europe, the structure of the household and the pattern of marriage changed. In eastern Europe, both men and women usually married before the age of twenty E

19 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Over the course of the eighteenth century, bread prices: 1.slowly fell 2.skyrocketed 3.slowly rose 4.sharply fell Q

20 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Over the course of the eighteenth century, bread prices: 1.slowly fell 2.skyrocketed 3.slowly rose 4.sharply fell A

21 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Over the course of the eighteenth century, bread prices: 3.slowly rose Historians now believe that during the eighteenth century bread prices slowly but steadily rose, spurred largely by population growth. Since bread was their main food, this inflation put pressure on the poor E

22 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which of the following countries saw the most improvement in agricultural methods in the eighteenth century? 1.the Netherlands 2.Poland 3.Russia 4.Prussia Q

23 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which of the following countries saw the most improvement in agricultural methods in the eighteenth century? 1.the Netherlands 2.Poland 3.Russia 4.Prussia A

24 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Which of the following countries saw the most improvement in agricultural methods in the eighteenth century? 1.the Netherlands The drive to improve agricultural production began during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in the Low Countries, where the pressures of the growing population and the shortage of land required changes in cultivation. Dutch landlords and farmers devised better ways to build dikes and to drain land, so they could farm more land. They also experimented with new crops, such as clover and turnips, that would increase the supply of animal fodder and restore the soil E

25 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. In 1700, Europes population was between: 1.50 and 60 million and 120 million and 340 million and 430 million Q

26 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. In 1700, Europes population was between: 1.50 and 60 million and 120 million and 340 million and 430 million A

27 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: In 1700, Europes population was between: and 120 million In 1700, Europes population, excluding the European provinces of the Ottoman Empire, was probably between 100 million and 120 million people. By 1800, the figures had risen to almost 190 million and by 1850, to 260 million E

28 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Over the course of the eighteenth century, disposable income: 1.rose in England, but fell on the Continent 2.fell throughout Europe 3.rose only in central Europe 4.rose throughout Europe Q

29 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Over the course of the eighteenth century, disposable income: 1.rose in England, but fell on the Continent 2.fell throughout Europe 3.rose only in central Europe 4.rose throughout Europe A

30 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Over the course of the eighteenth century, disposable income: 4.rose throughout Europe For reasons that are still not clear, during the eighteenth century, first the English and then the people on the Continent came to have more disposable income. This wealth may have resulted from the improvements in agriculture. Those incomes allowed people to buy consumer goods that previous generations had inherited or did not possess E

31 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Industrial Revolution came first to: 1.France 2.Great Britain 3.Prussia 4.the Netherlands Q

32 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Industrial Revolution came first to: 1.France 2.Great Britain 3.Prussia 4.the Netherlands A

33 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The Industrial Revolution came first to: b. Great Britain Great Britain was the home of the Industrial Revolution and, until the middle of the nineteenth century, remained the industrial leader of Europe E

34 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Between 1600 and 1750, the cities that grew most rapidly were: 1.university towns 2.market towns 3.capitals and ports 4.All of the above Q

35 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Between 1600 and 1750, the cities that grew most rapidly were: 1.university towns 2.market towns 3.capitals and ports 4.All of the above A

36 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Between 1600 and 1750, the cities that grew most rapidly were: 3.capitals and ports In particular, between 1600 and 1750, the cities that grew most vigorously were capitals and ports. This situation reflects the success of monarchical state building during those years and the consequent burgeoning of bureaucracies, armies, courts, and other groups who lived in the capitals E

37 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Most European Jews lived in: 1.eastern Europe 2.central Europe 3.northern Europe 4.southern Europe Q

38 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Most European Jews lived in: 1.eastern Europe 2.central Europe 3.northern Europe 4.southern Europe A

39 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Most European Jews lived in: 1.eastern Europe Although the small Jewish communities of Amsterdam and other Western European cities became famous for their intellectual life and financial institutions, most European Jews lived in Eastern Europe E


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