Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The French parlements spoke for the: 1.aristocracy 2.people 3.monarchy 4.peasants 18.01 Q.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The French parlements spoke for the: 1.aristocracy 2.people 3.monarchy 4.peasants 18.01 Q."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The French parlements spoke for the: 1.aristocracy 2.people 3.monarchy 4.peasants 18.01 Q

2 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The French parlements spoke for the: 1.aristocracy 2.people 3.monarchy 4.peasants 18.01 A

3 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The French parlements spoke for the: 1.aristocracy Parlements spoke for aristocratic interests and appeared to have enjoyed public support. By the second half of the eighteenth century, many French nobles shared with the wealthy professional and commercial classes similar economic interests and similar goals for administrative reforms that would support economic growth. 18.01 E

4 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Calonne sought support for his economic plan from the: 1.National Assembly 2.people of Paris 3.Estates General 4.Assembly of Notables 18.02 Q

5 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Calonne sought support for his economic plan from the: 1.National Assembly 2.people of Paris 3.Estates General 4.Assembly of Notables 18.02 A

6 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Calonne sought support for his economic plan from the: 4.Assembly of Notables Calonne needed public support for such bold new undertakings. In February 1787, he met with an Assembly of Notables, nominated by the royal ministry from the upper ranks of the aristocracy and the church, to seek support for his plan. 18.02 E

7 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Representatives to the Estates General brought cahiers de doléances, or: 1.proofs of legitimacy 2.lists of grievances 3.invitations from the king 4.tokens of respect for the monarchy 18.03 Q

8 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Representatives to the Estates General brought cahiers de doléances, or: 1.proofs of legitimacy 2.lists of grievances 3.invitations from the king 4.tokens of respect for the monarchy 18.03 A

9 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Representatives to the Estates General brought cahiers de doléances, or: 2.lists of grievances When the representatives came to the royal palace, they brought with them cahiers de doléances, or lists of grievances, registered by the local electors, to be presented to the king. 18.03 E

10 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Representatives of the Third Estate were primarily members of the: 1.clergy 2.nobility 3.commercial and professional middle class 4.None of the above 18.04 Q

11 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Representatives of the Third Estate were primarily members of the: 1.clergy 2.nobility 3.commercial and professional middle class 4.None of the above 18.04 A

12 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Representatives of the Third Estate were primarily members of the: 3.commercial and professional middle class The First Estate was the clergy, the Second Estate the nobility, and the Third Estate was, theoretically, everyone else in the kingdom, although its representatives were drawn primarily from wealthy members of the commercial and professional middle classes. All the representatives in the Estates General were men. 18.04 E

13 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. On July 11, 1789, Louis XVI dismissed Necker, his minister of: 1.finance 2.war 3.state 4.justice 18.05 Q

14 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. On July 11, 1789, Louis XVI dismissed Necker, his minister of: 1.finance 2.war 3.state 4.justice 18.05 A

15 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: On July 11, 1789, Louis XVI dismissed Necker, his minister of: 1.finance On July 11, without consulting Assembly leaders, Louis abruptly dismissed Necker, his minister of finance. 18.05 E

16 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. On October 5, 1789, some 7,000 women marched on: 1.the Louvre 2.Versailles 3.the Bastille 4.Paris 18.06 Q

17 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. On October 5, 1789, some 7,000 women marched on: 1.the Louvre 2.Versailles 3.the Bastille 4.Paris 18.06 A

18 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: On October 5, 1789, some 7,000 women marched on: 2.Versailles On October 5, some 7,000 Parisian women armed with pikes, guns, swords, and knives marched to Versailles demanding more bread. 18.06 E

19 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Under the Constitution of 1791, the citizens of France were divided between: 1.active and passive citizens 2.natives and aliens 3.superior and inferior citizens 4.citizens of the sword and of the robe 18.07 Q

20 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Under the Constitution of 1791, the citizens of France were divided between: 1.active and passive citizens 2.natives and aliens 3.superior and inferior citizens 4.citizens of the sword and of the robe 18.07 A

21 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Under the Constitution of 1791, the citizens of France were divided between: 1.active and passive citizens The constitution provided for an elaborate system of indirect elections to thwart direct popular pressure on the government. The citizens of France were divided into active and passive categories. Only active citizensthat is, men paying annual taxes equal to three days of local labor wagescould vote. 18.07 E

22 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The National Constituent Assembly: 1.established deism as the state religion 2.outlawed Christianity 3.outlawed workers associations 4.All of the above 18.08 Q

23 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The National Constituent Assembly: 1.established deism as the state religion 2.outlawed Christianity 3.outlawed workers associations 4.All of the above 18.08 A

24 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The National Constituent Assembly: 3.outlawed workers associations On June 14, 1791, the Assembly crushed the attempts of urban workers to protect their wages by enacting the Chapelier Law, which forbade workers associations. 18.08 E

25 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Émigrés were: 1.French aristocrats who refused to leave France 2.revolutionary agents who left France 3.French aristocrats who left France 4.non-French revolutionary activists 18.09 Q

26 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Émigrés were: 1.French aristocrats who refused to leave France 2.revolutionary agents who left France 3.French aristocrats who left France 4.non-French revolutionary activists 18.09 A

27 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Émigrés were: 3.French aristocrats who left France As it became clear that the old political and social order was undergoing fundamental and probably permanent change, many aristocrats, eventually over 16,000, left France. Known as the émigrés, they settled in countries near the French border, where they sought to foment counterrevolution. 18.09 E

28 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The most famous political club to emerge from the Estates General was the: 1.Jacobins 2.Liberals 3.Sans-Culottes 4.Committee on Public Safety 18.10 Q

29 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The most famous political club to emerge from the Estates General was the: 1.Jacobins 2.Liberals 3.Sans-Culottes 4.Committee on Public Safety 18.10 A

30 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The most famous political club to emerge from the Estates General was the: 1.Jacobins Ever since the original gathering of the Estates General, deputies from the Third Estate had organized themselves into clubs composed of politically like- minded persons. The most famous and best organized of these clubs were the Jacobins because the group met in a former Dominican priory dedicated to St. Jacques (James) in Paris. 18.10 E

31 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The sans-culottes wanted, above all else: 1.democracy 2.tax relief 3.the right to vote 4.relief from food shortages and high prices 18.11 Q

32 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The sans-culottes wanted, above all else: 1.democracy 2.tax relief 3.the right to vote 4.relief from food shortages and high prices 18.11 A

33 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The sans-culottes wanted, above all else: 4.relief from food shortages and high prices The sans-culottes generally knew what they wanted. The Parisian tradespeople and artisans sought immediate relief from food shortages and rising prices through price controls. 18.11 E

34 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Thermidorian Reaction brought an end to: 1.the Reign of Terror 2.the French Revolution 3.moderate influences in the revolutionary government 4.Frances wars with its European neighbors 18.12 Q

35 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Thermidorian Reaction brought an end to: 1.the Reign of Terror 2.the French Revolution 3.moderate influences in the revolutionary government 4.Frances wars with its European neighbors 18.12 A

36 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The Thermidorian Reaction brought an end to: 1.the Reign of Terror The tempering of the revolution, called the Thermidorian Reaction, began of its association with the events of 9 Thermidore, consisted of the destruction of the machinery of terror and the establishment of a new constitutional regime. It resulted from a widespread feeling that the revolution had become too radical. Within a short time, the Reign of Terror, which had claimed more than 25,000 victims, came to a close. 18.12 E


Download ppt "© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The French parlements spoke for the: 1.aristocracy 2.people 3.monarchy 4.peasants 18.01 Q."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google