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Reforming American Society 8 8 CHAPTER Overview Time Lines Transparencies Chapter Assessment Religion Sparks Reform Slavery and Abolition Women and Reform.

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Presentation on theme: "Reforming American Society 8 8 CHAPTER Overview Time Lines Transparencies Chapter Assessment Religion Sparks Reform Slavery and Abolition Women and Reform."— Presentation transcript:

1 Reforming American Society 8 8 CHAPTER Overview Time Lines Transparencies Chapter Assessment Religion Sparks Reform Slavery and Abolition Women and Reform The Changing Workplace SECTION

2 THEMES IN CHAPTER 8 Reforming American Society 8 8 CHAPTER Cultural DiversityExpanding DemocracyWomen in America “What is a man born for but to be a Reformer, a Remaker of what man has made; a renouncer of lies; a restorer of truth and good... ?” Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1841 HOME Science and Technology

3 Reforming American Society 8 8 CHAPTER What do you know? What do you already know about abolition and other reform movements of the 19 th century? Who were some of the leaders of these movements? What reforms did they call for? HOME

4 Time Line 8 8 CHAPTER The United States HOME 1831 Nat Turner leads slave rebellion. William Lloyd Garrison begins publishing The Liberator First strike occurs in Lowell textile mills. National Trades’ Union is formed Grimké sisters lecture on the evils of slavery Lowell textile mills open Dorothea Dix campaigns for public hospitals for the mentally ill. Seneca Falls women’s rights convention is held.

5 Time Line 8 8 CHAPTER The World HOME 1840 World’s Anti-Slavery Convention is held in London Britain abolishes slavery in its empire King George IV of Great Britain dies Decembrist revolt in Russia occurs Napoleon dies Great Potato Famine begins in Ireland Communist Manifesto is published.

6 Religion Sparks Reform 1 Learn About the Second Great Awakening and other spiritual reform movements. To Understand how religion shaped the social and political reform movements of the period. HOME SECTION

7 Religion Sparks Reform 1 HOME SECTION Key Idea Changes in the political and economic arenas contribute to the Second Great Awakening, a renewal of religious sentiment that brings about a host of social reform movements.

8 Section Religion Sparks Reform 1 Assessment What were some events and ideas that relate to the Second Great Awakening? SUMMARIZING 1 HOME SECTION revivals transcendentalism the African Methodist Episcopal Church Ralph Waldo Emerson school and prison reform the Unitarian movement Second Great Awakening

9 Section Religion Sparks Reform 1 Consider the philosophical and religious ideas expressed during the Second Great Awakening. What were the key values and beliefs that guided 19th-century reformers’ actions? SYNTHESIZING Assessment 1 concepts of individualism and individual salvation attitudes toward social responsibility the viewpoints of Finney, Channing, and Emerson THINK ABOUT HOME SECTION

10 Section Religion Sparks Reform 1 Assessment 1 How might 19th-century reform movements have influenced reform movements today? RECOGNIZING EFFECTS 19th-century reforms in schools, prisons, and asylums who is responsible for reform the social problems that are addressed today THINK ABOUT HOME SECTION

11 Slavery and Abolition 2 Learn About the abolition movement, the lives of African Americans, and debates over slavery. To Understand the growing rift between the North and the South. HOME SECTION

12 Slavery and Abolition 2 HOME SECTION Key Idea Slavery becomes an explosive issue, as more Americans join reformers working for abolition.

13 Slavery and Abolition 2 Section Assessment 2 What were some of the major antislavery and proslavery actions that occurred from 1820 to 1850? SUMMARIZING HOME SECTION ANTISLAVERY ACTIONSPROSLAVERY ACTIONS the defeat of the Virginia motion for abolition tighter slave regulations the growth of vigilance committees the 1836 gag rule publication of The Liberator and Appeal to the Colored Citizens of the World formation of antislavery societies Nat Turner’s Rebellion

14 Slavery and Abolition 2 Section What was a more effective strategy—violence or nonviolence—for achieving the abolitionists’ goal of eliminating slavery? FORMING OPINIONS Assessment 2 Garrison’s and Walker’s remarks Frederick Douglass’s views abolitionists’ petitions to Congress Southerners’ reactions to Nat Turner’s Rebellion THINK ABOUT HOME SECTION

15 Slavery and Abolition 2 Section Assessment 2 Analyze the similarities and differences between the situations of free blacks in the North and slaves in the South. COMPARING AND CONTRASTING the experiences of African-American workers in the North the conditions of rural and urban slaves slave owners’ perceptions of the Northern “wage slave” THINK ABOUT HOME SECTION

16 Women and Reform 3 Learn About traditional women’s roles and reform activities. To Understand the early development of the women’s rights movement. HOME SECTION

17 Women and Reform 3 HOME SECTION Key Idea Women reformers expand their efforts from reform movements—such as abolition and temperance—to work for women’s rights.

18 Section Women and Reform 3 Assessment 3 What were historical events, ideas, and people that relate to women addressing gender inequity in the 19th century? SUMMARIZING HOME SECTION Stanton, Mott, the Grimké sisters Troy Female Seminary Seneca Falls convention Cult of domesticity Women address gender inequity. Elizabeth Blackwell, Amelia Bloomer, Margaret Fuller

19 Section Women and Reform 3 The Seneca Falls “Declaration of Sentiments” asserted that “woman is man’s equal.” In what ways would that change the status women held at that time? ANALYZING Assessment 3 women’s social, economic, and legal status in the early and mid-1800s married women’s domestic roles single women’s career opportunities and wages THINK ABOUT HOME SECTION

20 Section Women and Reform 3 Assessment 3 On a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 representing “most effective,” rank women’s effectiveness as reformers in the following areas: education, health, temperance, abolition, and women’s rights. EVALUATING the problems that each social reform was directed toward which reforms seem the most crucial, and why THINK ABOUT HOME SECTION

21 The Changing Workplace 4 Learn About changes in manufacturing and factories. To Understand the problems faced by the emerging industrial workforce. HOME SECTION

22 The Changing Workplace 4 HOME SECTION Key Idea A growing industrial workforce faces problems arising from changes in manufacturing and the creation of the factory system.

23 Section The Changing Workplace 4 Assessment 4 How did factory workers respond to worsening conditions? SUMMARIZING HOME SECTION Worsening conditions in factories the 1834 and 1836 strikes at Lowell the 1835 coal workers’ strike in Philadelphia the formation of the National Trades’ Union in 1834 the formation of the Ladies Industrial Association in 1845 Workers responses:

24 Section The Changing Workplace 4 Did the positive effects of mechanizing the manufacturing process outweigh the negative effects? ANALYZING ISSUES Assessment 4 HOME SECTION changes in job opportunities for artisans, women, and unskilled male laborers changes in employer-employee relationships working conditions in factories the cost of manufactured goods THINK ABOUT

25 Section The Changing Workplace 4 Assessment 4 If you were working in a factory during the mid-1800s, would you be a striker or a strikebreaker? FORMING OPINIONS how your decision would be affected by whether you were a native-born American or an immigrant how your decision would be affected by whether you were an artisan or an unskilled laborer the outcome of most strikes during the 1830s and 1840s THINK ABOUT HOME SECTION

26 Chapter 8 Assessment 1. What new religious ideas set the stage for the reform movements of the mid-19th century? 2. Briefly explain the concept of transcendentalism. 3. How did Dorothea Dix contribute to reform during this period? 4. Summarize the key abolitionist beliefs of William Lloyd Garrison, David Walker, and Frederick Douglass. 5. Describe the conditions of urban and rural slavery. HOME

27 Chapter 8 Assessment 6. What steps did white Southerners take to suppress slave revolts? 7. What was the cult of domesticity? 8. What was the purpose of the Seneca Falls convention? 9. Briefly describe the working conditions of the young women in the Lowell textile mills. 10. Why was the formation of the National Trades’ Union important? HOME


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