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Big Question: How can we learn from the results of our actions? Author: Charlotte Craft Genre:Myth.

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Presentation on theme: "Big Question: How can we learn from the results of our actions? Author: Charlotte Craft Genre:Myth."— Presentation transcript:

1 Big Question: How can we learn from the results of our actions? Author: Charlotte Craft Genre:Myth

2 Small Group Small Group Timer Timer

3 Review Games Story Sort Story Sort Story Sort Story Sort VocabularyWords Vocabulary Words: Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words

4 Spelling Words Words with ei and ie

5 brief believe receive leisure piece relief seize ceiling field neither apiece receipt yield deceive achieve grief niece protein shield conceited diesel retrieval unwieldy grievance deceitful

6 Big Question: How can we learn from the results of our actions? Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday

7 Vocabulary Words adorn cleanse lifeless realm spoonful bequeath exquisite inconvenience rare valuable Vocabulary Words More Words to Know

8 Monday Question of the Day How can we learn from the results of our actions?

9 Today we will learn about: Build Concepts Compare and Contrast Answer Questions Build Background Vocabulary Fluency: Rhythmic Patterns of Language Grammar: Commas Spelling: Words with ei or ie Things That We Value

10 Fluency Rhythmic Patterns of Language

11 Fluency: Rhythmic Patterns of Language Listen as I read “Valuables.” As I read, notice how I use line breaks and emphasize rhyming words to show the rhythm of the poem. Be ready to answer questions after I finish.

12 Fluency: Rhythmic Patterns of Language Contrast the speaker’s fossil with a fossil worth money. How does the speaker feel about the fossil she found?

13 Concept Vocabulary rare – seldom seen or found valuable – being worth something

14 Concept Vocabulary (To add information to the graphic organizer, click on end show, type in your new information, and save your changes.)

15 Build Concept Vocabulary Build Concept Vocabulary rare, valuable PeopleObjects Things That We Value

16 Compare and Contrast, Answer Questions Turn to Page 674 - 675.

17 Prior Knowledge Prior Knowledge What do you know about myths? Myths

18 Prior Knowledge This week’s audio explores Greek and Roman myths. After you listen, we will discuss what new information you learned about myths.

19 Vocabulary Words

20 adorn – to add beauty to; put ornaments on; decorate cleanse – to make clean lifeless – without life precious – having great value; worth much realm – kingdom spoonful – as much as a spoon can hold

21 More Words to Know bequeath – to give or leave by means of a will when a person dies exquisite – very lovely; delicate inconvenience – something inconvenient; a cause of trouble, difficulty, or bother

22 GrammarCommas

23 the king keeped gold silver and jewels in the dungeon The king kept gold, silver, and jewels in the dungeon. he didnt believe anything was more important than wealth He didn’t believe anything was more important than wealth.

24 Commas Midas rushed out of the room, through the palace, and into the garden. A series of prepositional phrases— out of the room, through the palace, into the garden—are set off from one another by commas.

25 Commas Commas can clarify meaning and tell readers when to pause. Put a comma after every item in a series but the last. King Midas turned roses, porridge, and a girl into gold. The king wept, moaned, and wrung his hands.

26 Commas When you speak or write to someone, you may use the person’s name or title. This noun of direct address is set off with a comma, or two commas if it is in the middle of a sentence. What’s wrong, Father? There’s not a thing, dear, for you to worry about.

27 Commas Appositives are noun phrases that describe another noun. They are set off by commas. Ms. Wong, my favorite teacher, received an award.

28 Commas Put a comma after an introductory word or phrases, such as yes, no, well, of course, or as usual. Yes, I did enjoy the story. In fact, it is my new favorite.

29 Commas Add commas where they are needed. Joan Mary and Wes want to turn the story into a play. Joan, Mary, and Wes want to turn the story into a play. They will write dialogue plan sets and hold auditions. They will write dialogue, plan sets, and hold auditions.

30 Commas Add commas where they are needed. Mr. Allen our music teacher will handle the sound effects. Mr. Allen, our music teacher, will handle the sound effects. Patty will you make the sets? Patty, will you make the sets?

31 Commas Add commas where they are needed. As usual Patty you have done a great job. As usual, Patty, you have done a great job. Who will play King Midas the most important role? Who will play King Midas, the most important role?

32 Commas Add commas where they are needed. Jada’s mom Mrs. Chandler will make costumes. Jada’s mom, Mrs. Chandler, will make costumes. King Midas Aurelia and others need costumes. King Midas, Aurelia, and others need costumes.

33 Spelling Words Words with ei and ie

34 brief believe receive leisure piece relief seize ceiling field neither apiece receipt yield deceive achieve grief niece protein shield conceited diesel retrieval unwieldy grievance deceitful

35 Tuesday Question of the Day Why do you think gold was so valuable to king Midas?

36 Today we will learn about: Word Structure: Suffixes Compare and Contrast Answer Question Draw Conclusions Vocabulary Fluency: Echo Reading Grammar: Commas Spelling: Words with ei and ie Social Studies: King Midas Social Studies: Language Things That We Value

37 Vocabulary Strategy: Suffixes Turn to Page 676 - 677.

38 King Midas Turn to Page 678- 685.

39

40 Fluency Echo Reading

41 Fluency: Echo Reading Turn to page 680, last two paragraphs. As I read, notice how I emphasize the rhyming words and pause at commas and periods to create rhythm. We will practice as a class doing three echo readings.

42 GrammarCommas

43 jose drawed a picture of king midas aurelia and the young man Jose drew a picture of King Midas, Aurelia, and the young man. the king was overcome with greif when his littel girl was turned to gold The king was overcome with grief when his little girl was turned to gold.

44 Commas A comma tells a reader when to pause. A noun of direct address is set off with a comma, or two commas if it is in the middle of a sentence. Appositives are noun phrases that describe another noun. They are set off by commas. A comma follows an introductory word or phrase and separates city and state in an address.

45 Spelling Words Words with ei and ie

46 brief believe receive leisure piece relief seize ceiling field neither apiece receipt yield deceive achieve grief niece protein shield conceited diesel retrieval unwieldy grievance deceitful

47 Wednesday Question of the Day How do you think King Midas will live his life differently after cleansing himself of the golden touch?

48 Today we will learn about: Compare and Contrast Answer Questions Word Structure Draw Conclusions Vocabulary Fluency: Rhythmic Patterns of Language Grammar: Commas Spelling: Words with ei and ie Social Studies: Gold in Medicine Things That We Value

49 King Midas Turn to Page 686- 696.

50 Fluency Rhythmic Patterns of Language

51 Fluency: Rhythmic Patterns of Language Turn to page 684, last three paragraphs. As I read, notice how I read the text like everyday speech, using a natural flow and rhythm. Now we will practice together as a class by doing three echo readings.

52 GrammarCommas

53 grandpa always says that the bestest things in life are free Grandpa always says that the best things in life are free. hes right a hug is free He’s right. A hug is free.

54 Commas A comma tells a reader when to pause. A noun of direct address is set off with a comma, or two commas if it is in the middle of a sentence. Appositives are noun phrases that describe another noun. They are set off by commas. A comma follows an introductory word or phrase and separates city and state in an address.

55 Commas Commas separate items in lists and set off words and phrases that interrupt the main flow of a sentence. Use commas to make your ideas clear. Unclear: Linda she thinks your play is funny smart and thoughtful. Clear: Linda, she thinks your play is funny, smart, and thoughtful.

56 Commas Review something you have written to see if you can improve it by adding commas to make your ideas clear.

57 Spelling Words Words with ei and ie

58 brief believe receive leisure piece relief seize ceiling field neither apiece receipt yield deceive achieve grief niece protein shield conceited diesel retrieval unwieldy grievance deceitful

59 Thursday Question of the Day Imagine not watching TV for a month. How might you spend your time instead?

60 Today we will learn about: Poetry Reading Across Texts Fluency: Partner Reading Grammar: Commas Spelling: Words with ei and ie Social Studies: Culture

61 “Jimmy Jet and His TV Set” Turn to Page 698 - 699.

62 Fluency Partner Reading

63 Fluency: Partner Reading Turn to page 684, last three paragraphs. Read this three times with a partner. Be sure to read with appropriate phrasing and emphasis and offer each other feedback.

64 GrammarCommas

65 this story is more funnier then that one This story is funnier than that one. my neice loves to write storys songs and poems My niece loves to write stories, songs, and poems.

66 Commas A comma tells a reader when to pause. A noun of direct address is set off with a comma, or two commas if it is in the middle of a sentence. Appositives are noun phrases that describe another noun. They are set off by commas. A comma follows an introductory word or phrase and separates city and state in an address.

67 Commas Test Tip: A comma and a conjunction may be used to join clauses and form a compound sentence. However, the clauses may also be joined by a semicolon.

68 Commas Example: The flowers shone in the morning sun, and their sweet scent filled the air. The flowers shone in the morning sun; their sweet scent filled the air.

69 Spelling Words Words with ei and ie

70 brief believe receive leisure piece relief seize ceiling field neither apiece receipt yield deceive achieve grief niece protein shield conceited diesel retrieval unwieldy grievance deceitful

71 Friday Question of the Day How can we learn from the results of our actions?

72 Today we will learn about: Build Concept Vocabulary Compare and Contrast Author’s Craft Word Structure Grammar: Commas Spelling: Words with ei and ie Order Form/Application Things That We Value

73 Compare and Contrast Writers sometimes use comparisons and contrasts to organize their writing. Clue words such as same, also, before, although, and however signal comparisons and contrasts. Good readers notice the author’s comparisons and contrasts and make their own as they read.

74 Author’s Craft An author is the writer of any piece of literature. An author is not one of the characters in a story, but creates the character, even if the story is told in the first person (using the pronoun I.)

75 Author’s Craft Authors choose what they will write, how they will describe the characters, and how long the story will be. Authors of folk or fairy tales can take old stories recorded long ago and rewrite them using new words.

76 Suffixes When a suffix is added to a base word, it changes the word’s meaning. Use the suffixes in these words from King Midas and the Golden Touch to determine their meanings.

77 Suffixes

78 Order Form/Application Have you ever ordered something through the mail or online? Have you ever applied to a special program? Each requires filling out a form and these forms can be found in print or electronically online.

79 Order Form/Application An order form is a chart a person uses to purchase from a catalog or advertisement. By completing the form, the customer can purchase merchandise. An application form is a means by which a person can apply for a job or a special school to which they wish to be accepted.

80 Order Form/Application Both online or print order forms and applications are complex, and have cells or blanks that need to be filled out carefully.

81 Order Form/Application Forms usually ask for a name, address, and phone number. In addition, an application may ask for your qualifications, education, or job history. On an order form, you also need to indicate what is to be purchased, and the cost.

82

83 GrammarCommas

84 losing the golden touch filled he with releif Losing the golden touch filled him with relief. “look father the roses are back they are not hard and uglie” “Look, Father, the roses are back! They are not hard and ugly.”

85 Commas A comma tells a reader when to pause. A noun of direct address is set off with a comma, or two commas if it is in the middle of a sentence. Appositives are noun phrases that describe another noun. They are set off by commas. A comma follows an introductory word or phrase and separates city and state in an address.

86 Spelling Words Words with ei and ie

87 brief believe receive leisure piece relief seize ceiling field neither apiece receipt yield deceive achieve grief niece protein shield conceited diesel retrieval unwieldy grievance deceitful

88 Story test Classroom webpage, Reading Test AR Other Reading Quizzes Quiz #


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