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You need your text book. Lesson 26 Day 2. Spelling Part A Part A 1. section 2. caution What is the same in each word? Many words end in –tion or –sion,

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Presentation on theme: "You need your text book. Lesson 26 Day 2. Spelling Part A Part A 1. section 2. caution What is the same in each word? Many words end in –tion or –sion,"— Presentation transcript:

1 You need your text book. Lesson 26 Day 2

2 Spelling Part A Part A 1. section 2. caution What is the same in each word? Many words end in –tion or –sion, and sometimes these letter combinations are suffixes and sometimes they are simply part of the word. -tion and – sion are usually pronounced /sh ə n/. Complete items 3-6 by adding –tion or –sion to the incomplete words. What is the same in each word? Many words end in –tion or –sion, and sometimes these letter combinations are suffixes and sometimes they are simply part of the word. -tion and – sion are usually pronounced /sh ə n/. Complete items 3-6 by adding –tion or –sion to the incomplete words. 3. vaca___ 4. ses____ 5. ques____ 6. deci_____ e

3 Phonics and Spelling  vision decision  The –sion in these words is pronounced /zh ən/  Part B  Choose the correct spelling for each word. 1. We went to the bus (stassion/station). 2. “Charlotte’s Web” is (ficsion/fiction). 3. Hockey games have lots of (action/acshun). 4. Enrico’s stamp (collecsion/collection) is very valuable.

4 Spelling A suffix is added to the end of a root word. A suffix is added to the end of a root word. prevent/prevention prevent/prevention recess/recession recess/recession Look at the spelling of each sets of words above. Look at the spelling of each sets of words above. prevention recession prevention recession The final t and s are usually dropped from a root word before adding –tion or –sion. The final t and s are usually dropped from a root word before adding –tion or –sion.

5 Vocabulary Turn to Student Edition p Turn to Student Edition p Read the selection titled “Life on the Farm.” Read the selection titled “Life on the Farm.”

6 summoning  If you are summoning someone, you are calling for the person to come.  Was anyone summoning you to breakfast this morning?  What sound is summoning the farmer at the start of the day?

7 nuisance  Something or someone that bothers you can be a nuisance.  What noises can be a nuisance when you are studying?  Is the rooster’s crowing helpful or is it a nuisance?

8 sedentary  If you have a sedentary job or lifestyle, you are not active or sitting down most of the time.  Is it better for your health to be active or sedentary?  Why can’t a farmer be sedentary?

9 oblige  When you oblige someone, you help the person.  Do you oblige your friends when they need help with homework?  Why is the farmer glad to oblige?

10 boasting  Someone who is boasting is telling other people wonderful things about himself or herself.  Have you been told that you are boasting?  About what might a farmer be boasting?

11 sway  When things sway, they swing slowly back and forth.  Do you sway back and forth as you dance?  What do stalks of wheat look like when they sway in the wind?

12 Grammar: Irregular Verbs Fern saw the spider web yesterday. Fern saw the spider web yesterday. I came home at noon. I came home at noon. What are the verbs in the sentences above? What are the verbs in the sentences above? saw, came saw, came The verbs are irregular and do not have the ending –ed, as do verbs such as walked, talked, or looked. The verbs are irregular and do not have the ending –ed, as do verbs such as walked, talked, or looked. She has seen many funny things. She has seen many funny things. I have come to the farm. I have come to the farm. seen & come are the main verbs in each sentence seen & come are the main verbs in each sentence has seen come has seen have come These helping verbs work with the main verbs to tell when an action takes place. These actions happened in the past but are not yet complete. These helping verbs work with the main verbs to tell when an action takes place. These actions happened in the past but are not yet complete. He has said He has said We have done We have done What are the main verbs? What are the main verbs? The helping verbs? The helping verbs? Now combine these two sets of verbs. Now combine these two sets of verbs.

13 “Charlotte’s Web” Turn in your Reading book to page Turn in your Reading book to page A fantasy is a story about events that could not happen in real life. Its characters, setting, and events take place in a make-believe world. Like fairy tales, fables, & myths, fantasies often have talking animals as characters. A fantasy is a story about events that could not happen in real life. Its characters, setting, and events take place in a make-believe world. Like fairy tales, fables, & myths, fantasies often have talking animals as characters. Genre Study Look at the information about fantasy on p Look at the information about fantasy on p A fantasy is a story about events that could not really happen. A fantasy is a story about events that could not really happen. Look for… Look for… Characters such as animals that do things real animals cannot do Characters such as animals that do things real animals cannot do A plot with a beginning, middle, and end A plot with a beginning, middle, and end

14 As you read “Charlotte’s Web” you will fill in the Characters, Setting, and Plot chart graphic organizer on Practice Book page 225.As you read “Charlotte’s Web” you will fill in the Characters, Setting, and Plot chart graphic organizer on Practice Book page 225. Characters :Setting: Plot:

15 Comprehension Strategy Look at the Comprehension Strategy at the bottom of page 300. Look at the Comprehension Strategy at the bottom of page 300. Ask questions as you read. This will help you focus on the important ideas in a selection. Ask questions as you read. This will help you focus on the important ideas in a selection. Asking questions is a good way to identify the most important information in a story. Asking questions is a good way to identify the most important information in a story. For example, after reading the title, you might ask: Who is Charlotte? Why is her web important? For example, after reading the title, you might ask: Who is Charlotte? Why is her web important? Asking questions should help you better understand what is happening in a story. Asking questions should help you better understand what is happening in a story.

16 “Charlotte’s Web” Spiders build webs using special body parts. The purpose of a spider’s web is to catch food, especially insects. Spiders build webs using special body parts. The purpose of a spider’s web is to catch food, especially insects. Have you ever seen a spider’s web? If so, what did it look like? Have you ever seen a spider’s web? If so, what did it look like? One purpose for reading a story is to learn something new. One purpose for reading a story is to learn something new. What characters are pictured or referred to on the title page? What characters are pictured or referred to on the title page? What do you think this story will be about? What do you think this story will be about?

17 Retelling What is Charlotte like? What is Charlotte like? The author does not describe Charlotte with these words. Readers must make an inference based on how the author describes her, and what they already know from their own lives. The author does not describe Charlotte with these words. Readers must make an inference based on how the author describes her, and what they already know from their own lives. Use your responses from Practice Book page 225 to write a short summary of “Charlotte’s Web,” including the characters, setting, problem, and solution of the story. Use your responses from Practice Book page 225 to write a short summary of “Charlotte’s Web,” including the characters, setting, problem, and solution of the story.

18 Fluency Good readers pay attention to punctuation. Good readers pay attention to punctuation. Think about the following punctuation marks. When you see each of these, what do they mean? Think about the following punctuation marks. When you see each of these, what do they mean? Comma Comma Period Period Question mark Question mark Exclamation mark Exclamation mark Quotation marks Quotation marks Pay attention to the punctuation as I read page 306 of “Charlotte’s Web” aloud. Identify each punctuation mark and tell me how to express it. Pay attention to the punctuation as I read page 306 of “Charlotte’s Web” aloud. Identify each punctuation mark and tell me how to express it. Partners take turns reading the third paragraph on page 310. remember to use punctuation as a guide. Partners take turns reading the third paragraph on page 310. remember to use punctuation as a guide.


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