Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual 14-1 Tissue a collection of similar cells and their intercellular substances that work together to perform.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual 14-1 Tissue a collection of similar cells and their intercellular substances that work together to perform."— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual 14-1 Tissue a collection of similar cells and their intercellular substances that work together to perform a particular function

3 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual 14-2 The Human Cell From LifeART, Super Anatomy 2, Copyright 1998, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

4 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual 14-3 Controlling Bleeding 1.Apply direct pressure. 2.Elevate the injured body part. 3.Apply Indirect pressure. 4.Apply ice. 5.Apply a tourniquet only as a last resort and only with proper training.

5 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual 14-4 Direct Pressure Apply Direct Pressure to Control Bleeding

6 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual 14-5 Indirect Pressure Locate the pressure point directly above the injury and apply pressure to that artery until the pulsation in that artery stops or bleeding is controlled. From LifeART, Super Emergency 1, Copyright 1998, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

7 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual 14-6 Dressings & Bandages Always remove rings, watches, or bracelets from the patient if you are dressing a hand or wrist. Try to leave the fingers and toes exposed so the circulation and sensation can be checked. Use sterile material. Control any bleeding. Open the dressing package using sterile technique, and touch only the corners, NOT the part that goes directly over the wound. Cover the entire wound.

8 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual 14-7 Dressings & Bandages, Cont. Apply the bandage snugly, but not too tight. The bandage should not be too loose or it may slip. Secure all loose ends with tape or tuck them inside the bandage. Put the bandage on in the position in which it is to remain. Do not try to bend a bandaged joint. Ask the patient how the dressing feels. If it is uncomfortable, rearrange it.

9 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual 14-8 Wound Care Keep the dressing clean and dry. If the dressing soaks through, add another gauze pad. If it gets wet, remove the dressing and replace it or return to the doctor. Watch the circulation in the injured extremity. Call the doctor if it becomes numb, tingly, pale, blue, or cold, or if the athlete experiences severe pain with motion. Cleanse the suture area twice a day using a solution of hydrogen peroxide, followed by an antibiotic ointment. Watch for signs of infection: redness, swelling, increased pain, a red streak up the arm or leg, foul- smelling drainage, or an elevation in temperature. If sutures were required, return for removal of the sutures in 5 to 14 days.

10 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual 14-9 Abrasion an open wound, road burn, or rug burn in which the outer layer of skin has been scraped off From LifeART, Emergency 2, Copyright 1998, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

11 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Laceration a jagged tear in the flesh From LifeART, Emergency 2, Copyright 1998, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

12 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Puncture Wound a soft tissue injury caused by the penetration of a sharp object From LifeART, Emergency 2, Copyright 1998, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

13 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Incision a clean, straight, knife-like cut From LifeART, Emergency 2, Copyright 1998, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

14 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Avulsion a painful soft tissue injury in which a flap of tissue is torn loose or pulled off completely From LifeART, Emergency 2, Copyright 1998, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

15 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Callus a thickened, usually painless, area of skin caused by friction or pressure From LifeART, Emergency 2, Copyright 1998, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

16 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Blister a bubble-like collection of fluid beneath or within the epidermis of the skin From LifeART, Emergency 2, Copyright 1998, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

17 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Skin Infections

18 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Hematoma a blood-filled swollen area; a goose-egg caused by bleeding under the tissues

19 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual ICE Procedure Ice Compression Elevation When applying ice to a wound, ice should be kept in place for 20 minutes, followed by an hour in which the ice is taken off. Repeat this cycle for a 24 to 72 hour period during waking hours, or until the swelling subsides. Make sure to protect the skin by placing a cloth or towel between the ice and skin.

20 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Contusion a soft tissue injury caused by seepage of blood into tissue; a bruise.

21 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Using a Donut Pad to Protect a Contusion

22 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Types of Movement

23 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Types of Movement, Cont.

24 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Major Muscles Both images from LifeART, Super Anatomy 1, Copyright 1998, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

25 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Strain an overstretching or tearing of the muscles and/or adjacent tissues; a pulled muscle

26 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Strain Classifications

27 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Myositis Ossificans a condition in which bone forms in and replaces muscle tissue as a result of trauma

28 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Tendonitis inflammation of a tendon

29 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Articulation a joint; the point at which two or more bones meet 3 Types: fibrous cartilaginous synovial

30 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Synovial Joints From LifeART, Super Anatomy 3, Copyright 1998, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

31 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Sprain a stretching or tearing of the ligaments, characterized by the inability to move, deformity, and pain

32 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Sprain Classifications

33 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual PRICE Technique Protect: avoid further injury. Rest: Rest the injured area. Ice: Use the ICE procedure. Compress: Compress the sprained area with an elastic wrap. Elevate: Elevate the injured area above the level of the heart.

34 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Dislocation Vs. Subluxation Dislocation –the separation of a joint and malposition of an extremity Subluxation –a partial dislocation

35 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Bursitis inflammation of a bursa

36 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Synovitis inflammation of the synovial membrane in a joint, characterized by pain, swelling, localized tension, and increased pain with movement

37 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Major Bones

38 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Skeletal System Functions 1. Provide support for the muscles, fat, and soft tissues. 2. Protect the internal organs. 3. Provide leverage for lifting and movement through the attachment of muscles. 4. Produce blood cells. 5. Store the majority of the body’s calcium supply.

39 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Fracture a crack or break in the continuity of a bone

40 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Types of Fractures From LifeART, Super Anatomy 2, Copyright 1998, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

41 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual Mike Meredith has been the city high hurdle champion ever since he was a freshman—quite a feat to say the least. His ultimate goal was to place a dime on each hurdle and come so close that he could knock them off without slowing down or knocking over a hurdle. With this drill there was always the chance of hitting one and falling down, but the drill increased his speed. Mike was lucky, he had never had a hard fall—until today. Tired from a long day at school and staying out late the night before, Mike didn’t concentrate very hard. He had done this drill a hundred times; in fact, he thought he could do it in his sleep. His final drill was a time trial. The coach set off the cadence: Ready… set… go. For some reason the starting blocks weren’t secured very well and they slipped slightly, slowing Mike’s start and putting him behind on his first hurdle. This didn’t bother him; he knew how to catch up. He buried his head down and went for it. Coming up to the sixth hurdle he was way

42 Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual behind and hit the hurdle hard, sliding across the all-weather track. Lying on his side, Mike looked like he was in a lot of pain. Tammy, the student trainer, was ready. She went right over to Mike and began first aid. What should Tammy do for Mike’s abrasions? What should she have in her fanny pack to protect herself from coming in contact with blood? What are some things Tammy should watch the wound for over the next few days?


Download ppt "Copyright © 2002 Career Publishing, Inc. Visual 14-1 Tissue a collection of similar cells and their intercellular substances that work together to perform."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google