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Why Are Men So Different?? NWACUHO 2010 Chuck Rhodes Sonoma State University.

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Presentation on theme: "Why Are Men So Different?? NWACUHO 2010 Chuck Rhodes Sonoma State University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Why Are Men So Different?? NWACUHO 2010 Chuck Rhodes Sonoma State University

2 Session Outline What are your expectations & introduction– 5 minutes Session Presentation – 20 minutes Small Group Discussion – 15 minutes Report Back – 10 minutes

3 Learning Outcomes Participants will develop an understanding of theories related to transition from adolescence to manhood. Participants will start examining the campus climate for men at their institution.

4 Benchmarks The general social benchmarks for reaching adulthood: –Completing one’s education –Getting married –Settling into one’s career –Leaving their parents home

5 Benchmarks Changes in percentages of populations that has reached these benchmarks: Men65%31% Women77%46%

6 When a boy becomes a man In the US this process has always been two tracts: Working class men Upper-middle and upper class men

7 When a boy becomes a man For working class men, they often learned their trade under the ‘apprenticeship’ of adult men – whether in agriculture or industrial. Until the 1930’s, the average age the men entered the work force was 16.

8 When a boy becomes a man Beginning in the 1930’s, laws of majority were codified in most states. It became generally accepted that the age one gained legal rights was 21. A man could enter into legal contracts, vote, buy alcohol, etc. There were some exceptions by states.

9 When a boy becomes a man The peace time draft began in 1940 and extended until The military, under the supervision of adult men became the ‘country’s largest fraternity.’ The men became the socializing vehicle to working class men.

10 When a boy becomes a man Until post World War II, the majority of colleges and universities were predominately white, male, and for the upper-middle and upper classes. In addition to training for a profession; colleges had the role of teaching morals, values and character. It was to prepare its graduates for his role in society. The college acted in the place of parents (adults) in socializing its students – in loco parentis.

11 When a boy becomes a man A variety of social and cultural changes starting in the 1960’s – –Masses of men and then women entered into the college and university system. –Ending of the draft, which has been the nation’s largest fraternity. –The various social justice movements –Changes in demand for masses of workers. –Change in the age of majority to 18 The result is there is no longer a clear definition of when a boy becomes a man

12 When a boy becomes a man The term adolescence was first used in The first book in the Peter Pan series was introduced in Jung and others began research on puer aeternus in the 1930’s While there were some books, little attention was given to the teen years until the 1950’s. Marie-Louise von Franz wrote the first major book on this topic in – Dan Kiley wrote the book the Peter Pan Syndrome.

13 What men learn in college – Harris & Struve Democracy –Opportunities for men to connect with men of other races, orientations, and classes. Patriarchy –Men set the standards to behavior among students on campus Competition –There is intense competition among men in sports, who one dates, video games, & alcohol consumption.

14 Guyland - Kimel There are three culture dynamics for Guyland –A culture of entitlement – guys are entitled to have toys, sex, rewards without having to earn them or assuming responsibility. –A culture of silence – men do not ‘narc’ on other men even when they break the law. –A sense of protection – parents and other respond that ‘good boys, white boys’ are entitled to protection.

15 What is Guyland With extended adolescence, Guyland is defined as the ‘boyhood’ side of the continuum that we are reluctant to leave. It’s drinking, sex, video games. It’s playing, reading, talking about sports. It’s television and movies. Guyland evolves almost exclusively around other boys. It’s a pure homosocial Eden uncorrupted by the sober responsibilities of adulthood.

16 What is Guyland The socialization process begins pre- high school.The socialization process begins pre- high school. Hazing and violence is used to make boys conform to the norms.Hazing and violence is used to make boys conform to the norms. “Bro’s before Ho’s – a pattern of using women as objects.“Bro’s before Ho’s – a pattern of using women as objects. Geeks, nerds, gays, are not welcomed in Guyland.Geeks, nerds, gays, are not welcomed in Guyland. Women often engage in high risk behavior in order to get the approval of men.Women often engage in high risk behavior in order to get the approval of men. Upper middle and upper income men continue to set the standards for Guyland.Upper middle and upper income men continue to set the standards for Guyland.

17 What opportunities do men have to explore their maleness on your campus?

18 What opportunities do men have to express their maleness on your campus

19 What can be done differently on your campus/ department/ hall to support positive male role development?


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