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(Relative Pronouns and Relative Clauses in German) Kontext: Arbeitswelt (Vorbereitet von Prof. Engel-Doyle, Version vom 24. September 2010)

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Presentation on theme: "(Relative Pronouns and Relative Clauses in German) Kontext: Arbeitswelt (Vorbereitet von Prof. Engel-Doyle, Version vom 24. September 2010)"— Presentation transcript:

1 (Relative Pronouns and Relative Clauses in German) Kontext: Arbeitswelt (Vorbereitet von Prof. Engel-Doyle, Version vom 24. September 2010)

2 Der junge Mann, der in der Firma von Herrn Schäfer Speditionskaufmann lernt, heißt Michael Händel. English equivalent: … who is apprenticing/training to become a certified shipping/logistics clerk at Mr. Schaefers company ….

3 Die junge Frau, die in Rostock Physik studiert, heißt Silke Petersen. English equivalent: … who is studying physics in Rostock ….

4 Journalistin ist ein Beruf, der Andrea interessiert. English equivalent: … that interests Andrea ….

5 Krankenpflegerin [= Krankenschwester] ist ein Beruf, für den Kathi sich interessiert. English equivalent: … that Kathie is interested in / … in which Kathie is interested

6 Pilot ist ein Beruf, den Markus interessant findet. English equivalent: … that Markus finds interesting / thinks is interesting ….

7 The relative pronoun is called that (= relative) because it stands for and refers/relates to a specific preceding noun in another clause. That noun is called ANTECEDANT. Das Zimmer, das Michaels Chef für ihn organisiert hat, ist klein, aber gemütlich und vor allem nicht sehr teuer. English equivalent: The room that Michael boss found/organized for him is small, but cozy and, above all, not very expensive.

8 The relative pronoun is called that (= relative) because it stands for and refers/relates to a specific preceding noun in another clause. That noun is called ANTECEDANT. Das Büro, in dem Michael arbeitet, hat ein großes Fenster und einen tollen Blick auf den Hafen. English equivalent: The office that Michael works in has a big window and a great view of the harbor.

9 The relative pronoun is called that (= relative) because it stands for and refers/relates to a specific preceding noun in another clause. That noun is called ANTECEDANT. Die Firma, für die Frau Müller arbeitet, ist sehr familienfreundlich. English equivalent: The company that Mrs. Miller is working for is very family oriented. / The company for which Mrs. Miller is working is very family friendly.

10 The relative pronoun is called that (= relative) because it stands for and refers/relates to a specific preceding noun in another clause. That noun is called ANTECEDANT. Der Mann, dessen Wagen direkt vor der Tür geparkt steht, ist der Chef. English equivalent: The man whose car is parked directly in front of the door is the boss.

11 maskulin Sg. Nominativ Akkusativ Dativ Genitiv neutrum Sg.feminin Sg.Plural (m+n+f) The German relative pronoun forms are basically the same as the definite articles. However, in the dative plural, –en is added. Similarly, all genitive forms attach/add –en. In addition, in the genitive masculine and neuter, the -s- is doubled.

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18 maskulin Sg. Nominativ Akkusativ Dativ Genitiv neutrum Sg.feminin Sg.Plural (m+n+f) der den dem dessen die der deren die denen deren das dem dessen

19 Like most* subordinated/dependant clauses in German, German relative clauses have the CONJUGATED VERB at the VERY END: *The only exception to this rule are subordinate clauses with double infinitive structures. Unlike any other non-conjugated verb part which always is at the end, double infinitives go even behind the subordinate conjugated verb (which stays at the very end) to the very, very end of the subordinated clause. The housing (that) Michaels boss organized for him is pleasant, but not very expensive. The name of the young man (who is) apprenticing/training as a shipping/logistics clerk at Mr. Schaefers company is Michael Händel.

20 Unlike in English, the relative pronoun is NEVER OMITTED in German: The housing that Michaels boss organized for him is pleasant, but not very expensive. The housing ______ Michaels boss organized for him is pleasant, but not very expensive.

21 Unlike in English, the relative pronoun is NEVER OMITTED in German: The young man who is apprenticing/training as a shipping/logistics clerk at Mr. Schaefers company is Michael Händel. The young man ______ apprenticing/training as a shipping/logistics clerk at Mr. Schaefers company is Michael Händel.

22 Unlike in English, if there is a PREPOSITION connected to the relative pronoun, it ALWAYS PRECEDES (= goes before) the relative pronoun: The office (that) Michael works in has big windows. The office in which Michael works has big windows.

23 Unlike in English, if there is a PREPOSITION connected to the relative pronoun, it ALWAYS PRECEDES (= goes before) the relative pronoun! + Unlike in English, the relative pronoun is NEVER OMITTED in German: The company that Mrs. Miller is working for is very family oriented. The company _____ Mrs. Miller is working for is very family oriented. The company for which Mrs. Miller is working is very family oriented.

24 Unlike in English, German relative clauses are ALWAYS SET OFF BY COMMAS (regardless whether they are defining or non-defining): The young man (who is) apprenticing/training as a shipping/logistics clerk at Mr. Schaefers company is Michael Händel. Michael Haendel, who is originally from Ruegen, is dreaming of a brilliant career in international business.


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