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BY: RYAN BANTA AND MICHAEL MARTIN ACCUSATIVE VS. DATIVE CASE AND VERBS.

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Presentation on theme: "BY: RYAN BANTA AND MICHAEL MARTIN ACCUSATIVE VS. DATIVE CASE AND VERBS."— Presentation transcript:

1 BY: RYAN BANTA AND MICHAEL MARTIN ACCUSATIVE VS. DATIVE CASE AND VERBS

2 DATIVE CASE In English the dative case is known as the indirect object. Unlike the accusative, which only changes in the masculine gender, the dative changes in all genders and in the plural. The pronouns also change correspondingly.

3 INDIRECT OBJECTS The noun or pronoun used to indicate person (Less often, the thing) to or for whom an activity is done is called the indirect object. An indirect object is in the dative case; it normally requires an accusative object or subordinate clause to complete its meaning Ex: Manni gibt dem obdachenlosen seine Pistole Manni gives the obdachenlosen his pistol

4 ACCUSATIVE In English the accusative case is known as the objective case (direct object). In German you can tell that a noun is in the accusative case by the masculine article, which changes from der / ein to den / einen.

5 ACCUSATIVE & DATIVE WORD ORDER In a sentence containing both and indirect object noun (dative) and a direct object noun (accusative), the indirect object noun precedes the direct object noun. Ex: Er gibt dem Fluggast eine bordkarte. He gives the passenger a boarding pass.

6 CONTINUED When the indirect object or the direct object appears as a pronoun, the pronoun precedes the noun object. Ex: Er gibt ihm eine Bordkarte He gave him a boarding pass Ex: Er gibt sie dem Fluggast He gives the passenger

7 STILL CONTINUED If a sentence contains both an indirect object pronoun and a direct object pronoun, then the direct object pronoun precedes the indirect object pronoun Ex: Er gibt sie ihm He gives him

8 REVIEW GAMES Accusative Pronouns Dative Verbs

9 WORKS CITED Deutsch Aktuell 2 Fifth Edition: Wolfgang S. Kraft


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