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Civics: Government and Economics in Action 1 Chapter 20: Criminal and Juvenile Justice.

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Presentation on theme: "Civics: Government and Economics in Action 1 Chapter 20: Criminal and Juvenile Justice."— Presentation transcript:

1 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 1 Chapter 20: Criminal and Juvenile Justice

2 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 2 Chapter Links Section 1 Crime in American Society Section 2 The Criminal Justice System Section 3 The Juvenile Justice System

3 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 3 Section Outline: I.The Problem of Crime II.The Types of Crimes III.The Causes of Crime Main Idea: Thousands of crimes are committed in the United States each year. The crimes, their causes, and what people think the system should do about crime vary. Key Terms: Assault Battery Burglary Embezzlement Treason Terrorism Section 1 Crime in American Society

4 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 4 The Problem of Crime Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) Statistics, 2000 –More than 10 million property crimes –Nearly 1.5 million violent crimes There is generally more crime in urban areas –There is more crime in poor neighborhoods Crime makes people afraid

5 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 5 The Types of Crimes Crimes against people –Acts that threaten, hurt, or end a persons life –Assault: placing someone in fear without actual physical contact –Battery: placing someone in fear with physical contact Crimes against property –Crimes against property; mostly stealing –Burglary: the illegal breaking into a building –Arson, Vandalism, Robbery, and Larceny

6 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 6 The Types of Crimes (cont.) White-collar crime –Non-violent crimes, often committed by office workers for business or financial gain –Embezzlement: stealing money that has been entrusted to your care Victimless crimes –Examples: drug use, or gambling. Crimes against the government –Treason: betrayal of ones country –Terrorism: use of violence in order to get what they want from the government or society

7 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 7 The Causes of Crime Poverty Social Change and Changing Values Poor Parenting Drug Abuse Permissive Courts Not Enough Money for Police Violence in the Media THERE IS NO SINGLE CAUSE!

8 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 8

9 2010 Crime Statistics LocationViolentMurderPropertyPopulation Georgia Metro areas 32, ,2057,922,112 Non-metro cities 4, ,555659,535 Rural Counties 2, ,9191,106,006 Wyoming1,104813,874563,626 California164,1331,809981,93937,253,956 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 9

10 Crime Prevention Choose a crime or cause of crime Create a poster advertising the prevention of this crime or cause Work with 1 partner Your group will turn in an illustration and 1 paragraph explaining the advertisement Civics: Government and Economics in Action 10

11 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 11 Main Idea: When an adult is arrested, he or she goes through a specific process. The process includes arraignment, indictment, trial, and sentencing or acquittal. Key Terms: Probable Cause Warrant Bail Indictment Arraigning Plea Bargain Parole Section 2 The Criminal Justice System Section Outline: I.The Arrest and Pretrial Process II.Going to Trial III. Correctional Institutions IV.Challenges Facing the System V.Proposals for Fighting Crime

12 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 12 The Arrest and Pretrial Process The Arrest –Probable Cause: good reason to believe that a suspect has been involved in a crime. –Warrant: a legal paper, issued by a court, giving permission to make an arrest, seizure, or search. The Preliminary Hearing –Before there is a trial, the prosecutor must show a judge that there is enough evidence to go ahead with the case. –Bail is set

13 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 13 The Arrest and Pretrial Process (cont.) Grand Jury –Indictment: a formal charge against the accused –Arraignment: a court hearing in which the defendant is formally charged with a crime, and enters a plea of guilty, not guilty, or no contest. –Usually deals with more serious crimes Pretrial Motions –Usually concerns evidence that may be used Plea Bargaining –Agreeing to plead guilty in exchange for a lesser charge or a lighter sentence.

14 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 14 Going to Trial Jury Selection –Citizens are called to serve on juries –Must decide if the defendant is innocent or guilty The Trial –The defendant has the right to a speedy and public trial. Defendants are also entitled to a lawyer. –Witnesses may be called by the defense or prosecution attorneys. Sentencing –The judge selects a sentence between the maximum and minimum for that crime.

15 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 15 Correctional Institutions Convicts enter the corrections system –This term is meant to imply that the system will correct the criminal, teaching him not to commit said crime again. Parole –Letting an inmate go free to serve the rest of his or her sentence outside of a prison.

16 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 16 Proposals for Fighting Crime 1.Preventing Crime Neighborhood Watch and more police to patrol 2.Being Tougher on Criminals Mandatory sentences and capital punishment (death-penalty) 3.Rehabilitation Trying to teach inmates to live productive lives when they are released

17 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 17 Main Idea: The juvenile justice system was specially designed for troubled youths younger than 18. This system involves a different process and different penalties from those in the adult criminal justice system. Key Terms: Delinquent Status Offender Section 3 The Juvenile Justice System Section Outline: I.Juvenile Courts II.Juvenile Court Procedure III.Strengthening Juvenile Justice

18 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 18 Juvenile Courts –Established in Illinois, 1899 –Courts set aside for young people –Delinquent: a juvenile found guilty of a crime –Status Offender: a youth who is found guilty with running away, truancy, or disobedience.

19 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 19 Juvenile Court Procedure 1.Arrest and Intake 2.The Initial Hearing 3.The Adjudicatory Hearing Takes the place of a trial 4.The Dispositional Hearing Judge decides on a sentence 5.Aftercare Each youth is assigned a parole officer

20 Civics: Government and Economics in Action 20 Strengthening Juvenile Justice Community Based Programs Diversion Programs Preventing Juvenile Crime


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