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Agenda 11/11 Focus: Moving from dark to light: Introducing Romanticism Focus: Moving from dark to light: Introducing Romanticism 15 minutes to finish ALIS.

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Presentation on theme: "Agenda 11/11 Focus: Moving from dark to light: Introducing Romanticism Focus: Moving from dark to light: Introducing Romanticism 15 minutes to finish ALIS."— Presentation transcript:

1 Agenda 11/11 Focus: Moving from dark to light: Introducing Romanticism Focus: Moving from dark to light: Introducing Romanticism 15 minutes to finish ALIS editing 15 minutes to finish ALIS editing Dropping off your gothic symbols in the lockbox Dropping off your gothic symbols in the lockbox Creating your own Romantic Metaphor Creating your own Romantic MetaphorRomantic HW: Follow the website calendar. HW: Follow the website calendar.

2 Agenda 11/12 (Shortened Class) Focus: Exploring the Romantic metaphor Focus: Exploring the Romantic metaphor Poll: Are You a Romantic? Poll: Are You a Romantic? What is Romanticism? One students interpretation. What is Romanticism? One students interpretation. interpretation Sharing Romantic metaphors and exploring their role in Longfellows poetry Sharing Romantic metaphors and exploring their role in Longfellows poetry HW: Follow the website calendar. HW: Follow the website calendar.

3 American Romanticism Is of Romanticism Innocence Imagination Innovation Intuition Independence

4 Agenda 11/13 Focus: Augmenting our vocabulary; exploring Romantic poetry Focus: Augmenting our vocabulary; exploring Romantic poetry Quick vocabulary review and quiz Quick vocabulary review and quiz The miniest mini lesson of all: Works Cited The miniest mini lesson of all: Works Cited The eyes and ears of Romantic poetry; looking for metaphors and listening for sound devices The eyes and ears of Romantic poetry; looking for metaphors and listening for sound devices Time to roam around in a Romantic world Time to roam around in a Romantic world HW: Follow the website calendar. HW: Follow the website calendar.

5 Roaming Around in a Romantic World With your partner, take a little time to browse the selection of American Romantic poetry. With your partner, take a little time to browse the selection of American Romantic poetry. Settle on one poem that youre particularly drawn to. Settle on one poem that youre particularly drawn to. Start interpreting it by reading it aloud and annotating what you think are significant images and words choices. Start interpreting it by reading it aloud and annotating what you think are significant images and words choices. Then, identify what you see as the central metaphor. Explain what the metaphor is, what emotion its being used to represent, and why the connection is fitting. Then, identify what you see as the central metaphor. Explain what the metaphor is, what emotion its being used to represent, and why the connection is fitting. Lastly, interpret the poem through your ears; listen for sound devices such as repetition, rhythm, and rhyme. Analyze how these sound devices contribute to the poems themes. Lastly, interpret the poem through your ears; listen for sound devices such as repetition, rhythm, and rhyme. Analyze how these sound devices contribute to the poems themes.

6 Mount of the Holy Cross Thomas Moran

7 Snowflakes: Consider the poetic devices Longfellow uses herepersonification, repetition, alliteration, assonance, simile, metaphor, sensory imagery, etc. How do these devices influence the mood and tone of this piece? Out of the bosom of the Air, Out of the cloud-folds of her garments shaken, Over the woodlands brown and bare, Over the harvest-fields forsaken, Silent, and soft, and slow Descends the snow. Even as our cloudy fancies take Suddenly shape in some divine expression, Even as the troubled heart doth make In the white countenance confession, The troubled sky reveals The grief it feels. This is the poem of the air, Slowly in silent syllables recorded; This is the secret of despair, Long in its cloudy bosom hoarded, Now whispered and revealed To wood and field.

8 Symphonie Fantastique Listen to Symphonie Fantastique by Berlioz. As you listen, sketch the common images that you visualize as you listen. Listen for conflicts and opposition in the music. You should hear two different motives (a motif in music). Consider where there is a shift in the mood of this excerpt. Listen to Symphonie Fantastique by Berlioz. As you listen, sketch the common images that you visualize as you listen. Listen for conflicts and opposition in the music. You should hear two different motives (a motif in music). Consider where there is a shift in the mood of this excerpt. What is Gothic about this piece? What is Gothic about this piece?

9 Henry Wadsworth Longfellow The Tide Rises, the Tide Falls Henry Wadsworth Longfellow The Tide Rises, the Tide Falls The tide rises, the tide falls, The twilight darkens, the curlew calls; Along the sea-sands damp and brown The traveler hastens toward the town, And the tide rises, the tide falls. Darkness settles on roofs and walls, But the sea, the sea in darkness calls; The little waves, with their soft, white hands Efface the footprints in the sands, And the tide rises, the tide falls. The morning breaks; the steeds in their stalls Stamp and neigh, as the hostler calls; The day returns, but nevermore Returns the traveler to the shore. And the tide rises, the tide falls. The tide rises, the tide falls, The twilight darkens, the curlew calls; Along the sea-sands damp and brown The traveler hastens toward the town, And the tide rises, the tide falls. Darkness settles on roofs and walls, But the sea, the sea in darkness calls; The little waves, with their soft, white hands Efface the footprints in the sands, And the tide rises, the tide falls. The morning breaks; the steeds in their stalls Stamp and neigh, as the hostler calls; The day returns, but nevermore Returns the traveler to the shore. And the tide rises, the tide falls. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, "The Cross of Snow" Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, "The Cross of Snow" In the long, sleepless watches of the night, A gentle face--the face of one long dead-- Looks at me from the wall, where round its head The night-lamp casts a halo of pale light. Here in this room she died, and soul more white Never through martyrdom of fire was led To its repose; nor can in books be read The legend of a life more benedight. There is a mountain in the distant West That, sun-defying, in its deep ravines Displays a cross of snow upon its side. Such is the cross I wear upon my breast These eighteen years, through all the changing scenes And seasons, changeless since the day she died. In the long, sleepless watches of the night, A gentle face--the face of one long dead-- Looks at me from the wall, where round its head The night-lamp casts a halo of pale light. Here in this room she died, and soul more white Never through martyrdom of fire was led To its repose; nor can in books be read The legend of a life more benedight. There is a mountain in the distant West That, sun-defying, in its deep ravines Displays a cross of snow upon its side. Such is the cross I wear upon my breast These eighteen years, through all the changing scenes And seasons, changeless since the day she died. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's wife died tragically when an ember from the fireplace caught her dress on fire and burnt her so badly that she died a few days later. Longfellow tried to put out the fire, and it is said that his face was so badly disfigured that he grew the familiar long beard to hide the scars. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's wife died tragically when an ember from the fireplace caught her dress on fire and burnt her so badly that she died a few days later. Longfellow tried to put out the fire, and it is said that his face was so badly disfigured that he grew the familiar long beard to hide the scars. Eighteen years later he was looking at a book with pictures of the far west and the mountains when he came across a picture much like the one reproduced here. The poem that resulted is "The Cross of Snow," one of his most poignant and touching sonnets. Eighteen years later he was looking at a book with pictures of the far west and the mountains when he came across a picture much like the one reproduced here. The poem that resulted is "The Cross of Snow," one of his most poignant and touching sonnets.

10 Longfellows Poetry Put this in your notes: Put this in your notes: Romantic poetry has two important facets: Romantic poetry has two important facets: –1. Juxtaposes two ideas, images to create a third new emotion –2. Focusing on a small, natural object to derive a great truth about society, life (11 minutes) Partner with someone of the opposite sex. Using either Cross of Snow or Tide Rises, Tide Falls, evaluate it for its Romantic characteristics. (11 minutes) Partner with someone of the opposite sex. Using either Cross of Snow or Tide Rises, Tide Falls, evaluate it for its Romantic characteristics. –What are its Romantic characteristics? Label them on the poem. –Jot down the following answers directly on the poem. What is the message of this poem? What is the message of this poem? What two ideas is it juxtaposing? What two ideas is it juxtaposing? What is the natural object and what truth does it reveal? What is the natural object and what truth does it reveal? How does it compare in theme, message, or tone, to Thanatopsis? How does it compare in theme, message, or tone, to Thanatopsis? –Overall, what is your response to the Romantic notions of the life cycle, the afterlife, their approach to living? –Put both your names down and todays date: 10/18, and turn it in. HW: finish ALIS! Bring book and ideas about a few connecting points between the summer reading and this novelwhat literary elements, ideas, etc. can you compare? (Have a typed proposal for Monday! BSP) HW: finish ALIS! Bring book and ideas about a few connecting points between the summer reading and this novelwhat literary elements, ideas, etc. can you compare? (Have a typed proposal for Monday! BSP)

11 Agenda 11/8 Focus: Applying the Romantic metaphor; editing ALIS Focus: Applying the Romantic metaphor; editing ALIS Sign up for conferences! Sign up for conferences! The Fire Within The Fire Within The Fire Within The Fire Within The Fire of Driftwood The Fire of Driftwood Editing the second body paragraph Editing the second body paragraph Editing the second body paragraph Editing the second body paragraph Ideas for conclusions Ideas for conclusions HW: Follow the website calendar (4 th hour: Remember to bring in a hard copy of your rough draft tomorrow). HW: Follow the website calendar (4 th hour: Remember to bring in a hard copy of your rough draft tomorrow).

12 As you watch… Take notes on what this photostory reveals about Romanticism. Take notes on what this photostory reveals about Romanticism. In other words, In other words, –What are Romantic poets trying to reveal and/or accomplish? –What methods do they use to accomplish this?

13 Romanticism in The Fire of Driftwood (A) Describe what you see as a central metaphor; highlight the line that most sharply evokes this metaphor. (A) Describe what you see as a central metaphor; highlight the line that most sharply evokes this metaphor. Explain what aspect of nature the poet is exploring, what human emotion or experience it represents, and HOW it represents that emotion. Explain what aspect of nature the poet is exploring, what human emotion or experience it represents, and HOW it represents that emotion. (B) Look back to the five Is of Romanticism and to the notes you took on the Photostory. Write a few sentences (or make a few annotations) explaining what makes this poem distinctly Romantic. (B) Look back to the five Is of Romanticism and to the notes you took on the Photostory. Write a few sentences (or make a few annotations) explaining what makes this poem distinctly Romantic.


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