Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu To View the presentation as a slideshow with effects select “View”

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu To View the presentation as a slideshow with effects select “View”"— Presentation transcript:

1 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu To View the presentation as a slideshow with effects select “View” on the menu bar and click on “Slide Show.” To advance through the presentation, click the right-arrow key or the space bar. From the resources slide, click on any resource to see a presentation for that resource. From the Chapter menu screen click on any lesson to go directly to that lesson’s presentation. You may exit the slide show at any time by pressing the Esc key. How to Use This Presentation

2 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Chapter Presentation TransparenciesStandardized Test Prep Visual Concepts Resources Brain Food Video Quiz

3 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Introduction to Earth Science Chapter 1 Table of Contents Section 1 What Is Earth Science? Section 2 Science as a Process

4 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 What Is Earth Science? Chapter 1 Objectives Describe two cultures that contributed to modern scientific study. Name the four main branches of Earth science. Discuss how Earth scientists help us understand the world around us.

5 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 What Is Earth Science? Chapter 1 The Scientific Study of Earth Earth science the scientific study of Earth and the universe around it Scientific study of Earth began thousands of years ago with careful observations. For many centuries, scientific discoveries were limited to observations of phenomena that could be seen with the unaided eye. Earth science assumes that the causes of natural events, or phenomena, can be discovered through observation and experimentation.

6 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 What Is Earth Science? Chapter 1 Branches of Earth Science Scientists have used technology and hard work to build an immense body of knowledge about Earth. Most Earth scientists specialize in one of four major areas of study: the solid Earth, the oceans, the atmosphere, and the universe beyond Earth.

7 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Chapter 1 Earth Sciences Section 1 What Is Earth Science?

8 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 What Is Earth Science? Chapter 1 Branches of Earth Science, continued Geology geology the scientific study of the origin, history, and structure of Earth and the processes that shape Earth Geology includes many specialized fields of study, such as the study of earthquakes or volcanoes, exploration for natural resources such as coal and oil, and the study of Earth’s history through the study of rocks and fossils.

9 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 What Is Earth Science? Chapter 1 Branches of Earth Science, continued Oceanography oceanography the scientific study of the ocean, including the properties and movement of ocean water, the characteristics of the ocean floor, and the organisms that live in the ocean Like geology, oceanography includes specialized fields. Some oceanographers study ocean water. Others study waves, tides, and ocean currents. Still others study the ocean floor or the organisms that live in the oceans.

10 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 What Is Earth Science? Chapter 1 Branches of Earth Science, continued Meteorology meteorology the scientific study of Earth’s atmosphere, especially in relation to weather and climate Using satellites, radar, and other technologies, meteorologists study the atmospheric conditions that produce weather. They may use this information to prepare weather forecasts. Some meteorologists study climate, the patterns of weather that occur over long periods of time.

11 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 What Is Earth Science? Chapter 1 Branches of Earth Science, continued Astronomy astronomy the scientific study of the universe Astronomy is one of the oldest branches of Earth science. Modern astronomers use Earth-based and space- based telescopes, as well as other instruments, to study the sun, the moon, the planets, and the universe.

12 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 What Is Earth Science? Chapter 1 Branches of Earth Science, continued Reading Check How has technology affected astronomy?

13 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 What Is Earth Science? Chapter 1 Branches of Earth Science, continued Reading Check How has technology affected astronomy? The development of telescopes, satellites, and space probes has greatly expanded astronomers’ understanding of the universe.

14 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 What Is Earth Science? Chapter 1 Branches of Earth Science, continued Environmental Science Environmental science is a relatively new field of Earth science that involves the study of the ways in which humans interact with their environment. Environmental scientists study many issues, such as the use of natural resources, pollution, and the health of plant and animal species on Earth.

15 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 1 What Is Earth Science? Chapter 1 The Importance of Earth Science Natural forces not only shape Earth but also affect life on Earth. By understanding how natural forces shape our environment, Earth scientists can better predict potential disasters and help save lives and property. The work of Earth scientists helps us understand our place in the universe. The study of Earth science can help people gain access to Earth’s resources, and Earth scientists also strive to help people use those resources wisely.

16 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Objectives Explain how science is different from other forms of human endeavor. Identify the steps that make up scientific methods. Analyze how scientific thought changes as new information is collected. Explain how science affects society.

17 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Behavior of Natural Systems The goal of science is to explain natural phenomena. Scientists ask questions about natural events and then work to answer those questions through experiments and examination.

18 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Behavior of Natural Systems, continued Scientists start with the assumption that nature is understandable. Scientists also expect that similar forces in a similar situation will cause similar results. Scientists also expect that nature is predictable, which means that the future behavior of natural forces can be anticipated.

19 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Methods Over time, the scientific community has developed organized and logical approaches to scientific research. These approaches are known as scientific methods. Scientific methods are not a set of sequential steps that scientists always follow. Rather these methods are guidelines to scientific problem solving.

20 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Methods, continued The diagram below shows a basic flowchart of scientific methods.

21 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Methods, continued Ask a Question observation the process of obtaining information by using the senses; the information obtained by using the senses Scientific investigations often start with observations. Observations commonly lead to questions. Simple questions have fueled years of scientific research and have been investigated through scientific methods.

22 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Methods, continued Form a Hypothesis hypothesis an idea or explanation that is based on observation and that can be tested Once a question has been asked and basic information has been gathered, a scientist may propose a tentative answer, which is also known as a hypothesis. Most hypotheses are based on known facts about similar events.

23 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Methods, continued Reading Check Name two ways scientific methods depend on careful observations.

24 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Methods, continued Reading Check Name two ways scientific methods depend on careful observations. Observations may lead to interesting scientific questions and may help scientists formulate reasonable and testable hypotheses.

25 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Methods, continued Test the Hypothesis After a hypothesis is proposed, it is commonly tested by performing experiments. An experiment is a procedure that is carried out according to certain guidelines. independent variable in an experiment, the factor that is deliberately manipulated dependent variable in an experiment, the factor that changes as a result of one or more other factors (the independent variables)

26 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Methods, continued Draw Conclusions After many experiments and observations, a scientist may reach conclusions about his or her hypothesis. If the hypothesis fits the known facts, it may be accepted as true. If the experimental results differ from what was expected, the hypothesis is changed or discarded. The results of scientific inquiry may lead to new knowledge and new methods of inquiry that further scientific aims.

27 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Measurements and Analysis Measurement is the comparison of some aspect of an object or event with a standard unit. Scientists around the world can compare and analyze each other’s measurements because scientists use a common system of measurements called the International System of Units, or SI.

28 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Measurements and Analysis, continued Accuracy and Precision Accuracy refers to how close a measurement is to the true value of the thing being measured. Precision is the exactness of the measurement.

29 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Measurements and Analysis, continued Error Error is an expression of the amount of imprecision or variation in a set of measurements. Error is commonly expressed as percentage error or as a confidence interval.

30 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Measurements and Analysis, continued Observations and Models In Earth science, using controlled experiments to test hypotheses is often impossible. When experiments are impossible, scientists make additional observations to gather evidence. The hypothesis is then tested by examining how well the hypothesis fits or explains all of the known evidence.

31 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Measurements and Analysis, continued Observations and Models, continued Scientists also use models to simulate conditions in the natural world. A model is a description, representation, or imitation of an object, system, process, or concept. Scientists use several types of models, including physical models, graphical models, conceptual models, mathematical models, and computer models.

32 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Chapter 1 Models Section 2 Science as a Process

33 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Measurements and Analysis, continued Reading Check Name three types of models.

34 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Scientific Measurements and Analysis, continued Reading Check Name three types of models. Answers should include three of the following types of models: physical models, graphic models, conceptual models, computer models, and mathematical models.

35 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Acceptance of Scientific Ideas Scientific understanding moves forward through the work of many scientists, who build on the research of the generations of scientists before them. When scientists reach a conclusion, they introduce their findings to the scientific community. Publication of Results and Conclusions Scientists commonly present the results of their work in scientific journals or at professional meetings. Results published in journals are usually written in a standard scientific format.

36 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Acceptance of Scientific Ideas, continued Reading Check Name two places scientists present the results of their work.

37 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Acceptance of Scientific Ideas, continued Reading Check Name two places scientists present the results of their work. Scientists present the results of their work at professional meetings and in scientific journals.

38 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Acceptance of Scientific Ideas, continued Peer Review Scientists follow an ethical code that states that only valid experimental results should be published. To reduce bias, scientists submit their ideas to other scientists for peer review. peer review the process in which experts in a given field examine the results and conclusions of a scientist’s study before that study is accepted for publication

39 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Acceptance of Scientific Ideas, continued Formulating a Theory When an idea has undergone much testing and reaches general acceptance, that idea may help form a theory. theory the explanation for some phenomenon that is based on observation, experimentation, and reasoning; that is supported by a large quantity of evidence; and that does not conflict with any existing experimental results or observations A scientific law is a general statement that explains how the natural world behaves under certain conditions and for which no exceptions have been found. Theories and scientific laws can be changed if conflicting information is discovered in the future.

40 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Acceptance of Scientific Ideas, continued The Importance of Interdisciplinary Science Scientists from many disciplines commonly contribute the information necessary to support an idea The free exchange of ideas between fields of science allows scientists to identify explanations that fit a wide range of scientific evidence. When an explanation is supported by evidence from a variety of fields, the explanation is more likely to be accurate.

41 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Acceptance of Scientific Ideas, continued The diagram below shows how interdisciplinary science helped develop the impact hypothesis of the extinction of the dinosaurs.

42 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Science and Society The work of people, including scientists, is influenced by their cultural and personal beliefs. Science is a part of society, and advances in science can have important and long-lasting effects on both science and society.

43 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Science and Society, continued Science is also used to develop new technology, including new tools, machines, materials, and processes. Sometimes technologies are designed to address a specific human need. In other cases, technology is an indirect result of science that was directed at another goal.

44 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Section 2 Science as a Process Chapter 1 Science and Society, continued Scientists who are involved in research that leads to new technologies have an obligation to consider the possible negative effects of their work. Before making decisions about technology, people should consider the alternatives, risks, and costs and benefits to humans and to Earth.

45 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Maps in Action Chapter 1 Maps in Action Geologic Features and Political Boundaries in Europe

46 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Introduction to Earth Science Chapter 1 Brain Food Video Quiz

47 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Multiple Choice 1.A tested explanation of a natural phenomenon that has become widely adopted is a scientific A. hypothesis B. law C. theory D. observation Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

48 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Multiple Choice, continued 1.A tested explanation of a natural phenomenon that has become widely adopted is a scientific A. hypothesis B. law C. theory D. observation Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

49 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Multiple Choice, continued 2. If experimental results do not match their predictions, scientists generally will F. repeat the experiment until they do match. G. make the measurements more precise. H. revise their working hypothesis. I. change their experimental results. Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

50 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Multiple Choice, continued 2.If experimental results do not match their predictions, scientists generally will F. repeat the experiment until they do match. G. make the measurements more precise. H. revise their working hypothesis. I. change their experimental results. Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

51 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Multiple Choice, continued 3. Scientists who study weather charts to analyze trends and to predict future weather events are A. astronomers B. environmental scientists C. geologists D. meteorologists Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

52 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Multiple Choice, continued 3. Scientists who study weather charts to analyze trends and to predict future weather events are A. astronomers B. environmental scientists C. geologists D. meteorologists Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

53 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Multiple Choice, continued 4. What type of model uses molded clay, soil, and chemicals to simulate a volcanic eruption? F. conceptual model G. physical model H. mathematical model I. computer model Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

54 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Multiple Choice, continued 4. What type of model uses molded clay, soil, and chemicals to simulate a volcanic eruption? F. conceptual model G. physical model H. mathematical model I. computer model Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

55 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Multiple Choice, continued Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1 5. Which of the following is an example of a new technology? A. a tool that is designed to help a doctor better diagnose patients B. a previously unknown element that is discovered in nature C. a law that is passed to fund scientists conducting new experiments D. scientists who record observations on the movement of a star

56 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Multiple Choice, continued 5. Which of the following is an example of a new technology? A. a tool that is designed to help a doctor better diagnose patients B. a previously unknown element that is discovered in nature C. a law that is passed to fund scientists conducting new experiments D. scientists who record observations on the movement of a star Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

57 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Short Response 6. What is the term for the factors that change as a result of a scientific experiment? Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

58 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Short Response, continued 6. What is the term for the factors that change as a result of a scientific experiment? dependent variables Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

59 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Short Response, continued 7. Why do scientists often review one another’s work before it is published? Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

60 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Short Response, continued 7. Why do scientists often review one another’s work before it is published? to determine the validity of the results and conclusions Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

61 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Reading Skills Read the passage below. Then, answer questions 8–10. Scientific Investigation Scientists look for answers by asking questions. These questions are often answered through experimentation and observation. For example, scientists have wondered if there is some relationship between Earth’s core and Earth’s magnetic field. To form their hypothesis, scientists started with what they knew: Earth has a dense, solid inner core and a molten outer core. They then created a computer model to simulate how Earth’s magnetic field is generated. The model predicted that Earth’s inner core spins in the same direction as the rest of Earth does but slightly faster than the surface does. If the hypothesis is correct, it might explain how Earth’s magnetic field is generated. But how could the researchers test the hypothesis? Because scientists do not have the technology to drill to the core, they had to get their information indirectly. To do this, they decided to track the seismic waves that are created by earthquakes. These waves travel through Earth, and scientists can use them to infer information about the core. Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

62 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Reading Skills, continued 8. The possibility of a connection between Earth’s core and Earth’s magnetic field formed the basis of the scientists’ what? A. theory B. law C. hypothesis D. fact Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

63 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Reading Skills, continued 8. The possibility of a connection between Earth’s core and Earth’s magnetic field formed the basis of the scientists’ what? A. theory B. law C. hypothesis D. fact Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

64 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Reading Skills, continued 9. To begin their investigation, the scientists first built a model. What did this model predict? F. Earth’s outer core is molten, and the inner core is solid. G. Earth’s inner core is molten, and the outer core is solid. H. Earth’s inner core spins in the same direction as the rest of Earth does. I. Earth’s outer core spins in the same direction as the rest of Earth does. Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

65 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Reading Skills, continued 9. To begin their investigation, the scientists first built a model. What did this model predict? F. Earth’s outer core is molten, and the inner core is solid. G. Earth’s inner core is molten, and the outer core is solid. H. Earth’s inner core spins in the same direction as the rest of Earth does. I. Earth’s outer core spins in the same direction as the rest of Earth does. Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

66 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Reading Skills, continued 10. Why might the scientists have chosen to build a conceptual model of Earth, instead of a physical model of Earth? Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

67 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Reading Skills, continued 10. Why might the scientists have chosen to build a conceptual model of Earth, instead of a physical model of Earth? Because of the complexity of the inner workings of Earth, a conceptual model would be more practical and accurate than a physical model would be in this case. Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

68 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Interpreting Graphics Use the figure below to answer question 11. The figure shows a diagram of the four major areas studied by Earth scientists. Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

69 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Interpreting Graphics, continued 11. A scientist studying the events that take place in area C would be primarily concerned with which of the following? F. Earth’s age G. Earth’s weather H. movement of waves and tides I. movement of the stars across the sky Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

70 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Interpreting Graphics, continued 11. A scientist studying the events that take place in area C would be primarily concerned with which of the following? F. Earth’s age G. Earth’s weather H. movement of waves and tides I. movement of the stars across the sky Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

71 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Interpreting Graphics, continued Use the figure below to answer question 12. The figure is a flowchart of the scientific method. Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

72 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Interpreting Graphics, continued 12. What are two possible outcomes of the experimental process? What would a scientist do with the information gathered during the experimental process? Standardized Test Prep Chapter 1

73 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Interpreting Graphics, continued Answers should include the following: scientific methods are logical ways of solving problems but are not sets of steps that are followed in an invariable sequence, nor that lead to an invariable outcome; possible outcomes include new observations and data collection; scientists analyze data to decide whether the data support or disprove a hypothesis; if data disprove a hypothesis, the hypothesis is rethought; not only do experimental results sometimes lead to new hypothesis, but they also may open new avenues for investigation by suggesting new questions. Standardized Test Prep Chapter What are two possible outcomes of the experimental process? What would a scientist do with the information gathered during the experimental process?

74 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Scientific Methods The diagram below shows a basic flowchart of scientific methods. Chapter 1

75 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu The Importance of Interdisciplinary Science The diagram below shows a basic flowchart of scientific methods. Chapter 1

76 Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu Geologic Features and Political Boundaries in Europe Chapter 1


Download ppt "Copyright © by Holt, Rinehart and Winston. All rights reserved. ResourcesChapter menu To View the presentation as a slideshow with effects select “View”"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google