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© 2007 Capital Safety A New Era for an Old Standard A Review of Changes to ANSI Z359.1.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2007 Capital Safety A New Era for an Old Standard A Review of Changes to ANSI Z359.1."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2007 Capital Safety A New Era for an Old Standard A Review of Changes to ANSI Z359.1

2 © 2007 Capital Safety What is ANSI Z359.1? National standard for fall arrest equipment Originally published in 1992 and revised in 1999 Covers requirements for fall arrest equipment including harnesses, lifelines, lanyards, energy absorbers and anchorage connectors Standard is divided into 8 sections –Scope, Purpose, Application, Exceptions and Interpretations –Definitions –Requirements –Testing –Marking and Instructions –User Inspection, Maintenance and Storage of Equipment –Equipment, Selection, Rigging, Use and Training –References

3 © 2007 Capital Safety Changes to ANSI Z359.1 Expansion of standard to become ‘family of standards’ Effective date of November 24, 2007 Sections include: –Z359.0 Definitions and Terminology Used for Fall Protection and Fall Arrest –Z359.1 Safety Requirements for Personal Fall Arrest Systems, Subsystems and Components –Z359.2 Minimum Requirements for a Comprehensive Managed Fall Protection Program –Z359.3 Safety Requirements for Positioning and Travel Restraint Systems –Z359.4 Safety Requirements for Assisted-Rescue and Self- Rescue Systems, Subsystems and Components

4 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.1 Safety Requirements for Personal Fall Arrest Systems, Subsystems and Components Standard remains the same as the current standard with several important revisions and additions Gate hook strength of snaphooks and carabiners has changed –Gate face must withstand load of 3,600 pounds (up from 220 pounds) –Side of the gate must withstand load of 3,600 pounds (up from 350 pounds) –Minor axis of a snaphook or carabiner, except those with captive eyes, must withstand 3,600 pounds (new to standard) –Tensile load for the snaphook or carabiner must withstand 5,000 pounds (same as old version)

5 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.1 (Continued)

6 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.1 (Continued) Snaphooks and carabiners must be marked with: –Year of manufacture –Manufacturer’s identification –Supplier part number –Load rating for the major axis of the connector stamped or otherwise permanently marked on the device –Load rating for gate stamped or otherwise permanently marked on the gate mechanism –Markings for connectors shall be sufficient to provide traceability –For connectors that are non-integral, include the standard number, “Z359.1(07)”

7 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.1 (Continued) Front-mounted D-ring element on harnesses can now be used for fall arrest –Maximum free-fall distance must be limited to two feet and maximum arrest force to 900 pounds –The old standard only allowed the frontal D-ring to be used for ladder climbing, fall restraint and work positioning

8 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.1 (Continued) Twin-leg lanyards now addressed in standard –Must have a minimum of 5,000 pounds breaking strength –Must be marked with several warnings: Connect only the center snaphook to the fall arrest attachment element Do not attach the leg of the lanyard that is not in use to the harness except to attachment points specifically designated by the manufacturer for this purpose Do not rig the lanyard to create more than a six foot free-fall Do not allow the legs of the lanyard to pass under arms, between legs or around the neck

9 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.1 (Continued) Anchorage load has changed from “3,600 pounds when certification exists” to “two times the maximum arrest force permitted on the system when certification exists” Additions to the Equipment Rigging and Use section include requirements that harnesses and fall arrest systems be selected and properly sized for the user and connectors, snaphooks and carabiners must be compatible with the equipment they are used with Lanyards, lifelines and anchors- no knots and kept clear of workplace and environmental hazards Additions to the Training section include provisions that training address how to select, inspect and use fall protection equipment; training methods and language; and assessments of trainers Editorial revisions: –The term “user” has been clarified with the terms “competent person,” ”qualified person” and “authorized person”

10 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.2 Minimum Requirements for a Comprehensive Managed Fall Protection Program Guidelines to organize and manage a fall protection program –Identify, evaluate and eliminate (or control) fall hazards through planning –Ensure proper training of personnel exposed to fall hazards –Ensure proper installation and use of fall protection and rescue systems –Implement safe fall protection and rescue procedures Program required whenever one or more persons are routinely exposed to fall hazards

11 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.2 (Continued) Duties and responsibilities are laid out for each person associated with the comprehensive fall protection program –Employer-Commitment, provide procedures, equipment and training –Program Administrator-developing program, guidance & maintenence –Qualified Person - design/installation of equipment –Competent Person- program supervisor, hazard surveys, potential hazards, inspections, training and ability to stop work at hazardous site –Authorized Person- user of equipment, proper inspection –Competent Rescuer- procedures and training –Authorized Rescuer- user of rescue equipment and training –Qualified Person Trainer –Competent Person Trainer –Competent Rescuer Trainer

12 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.2 (Continued) Fall protection procedures should be developed based on results of fall hazard survey report –Survey of work environment by Qualified or Competent Person –Report prepared for each fall hazard –Identifies methods to eliminate or control the hazard Minimum requirements for fall protection procedures –Written by Program Administrator –Provide for 100% continuous fall protection –Include training and qualifications of authorized persons permitted to use system –Anchor identification and criteria –Equipment assembly, usage and inspection –Provisions for post-fall rescue –Requirements for investigation of incidents

13 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.2 (Continued) Preferred hierarchy for fall protection –Elimination or Substitution (removal of fall hazard) –Passive Fall Protection (isolation of hazard from workers) –Fall Restraint (prevents worker from reaching a fall hazard) –Fall Arrest (safely stops a fall after it has begun) –Administrative Controls (work practices or procedures that warn a worker before approaching a fall hazard) General Requirements for Fall Protection Systems –Certified components and anchors Certification must be in writing and must state that the parts meet the requirements of Z359 based on testing or the application of proven analytical methods carried out by a qualified person or entity –Design of system based on testing or engineering calculations –Design and installation must be performed under supervision of a Qualified Person –Maximum arrest force 1,800 pounds or less –Fall restraint limited to working surfaces at, or less than, a 4:12 slope

14 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.2 (Continued) Facilities under construction must consider fall hazards in the design stage –The preferred order of controlling fall hazards must follow the hierarchy –If a fall hazard cannot be eliminated, the facility must provide anchorage locations for fall protection equipment Training requirements are addressed in-depth –References and requires compliance with ANSI Z490.1, Criteria for Accepted Practices in Safety, Health and Environmental Training –Specific requirements for each person defined in the managed fall protection program –Regularly scheduled re-training –Documented performance through observation, measurement and recording of results

15 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.2 (Continued) Anchorage systems –Fall arrest anchorages must withstand a static load of 5,000 pounds for non-certified anchorages or two-times the maximum arresting force for certified anchorages –For work positioning systems, anchorages must withstand a static load of 3,000 pounds for non-certified anchorages or two-times the foreseeable force for certified anchorages –For travel restraint systems, anchorages must withstand a static load of 1,000 pounds for non-certified anchorages or two-times the foreseeable force for certified anchorages –For horizontal lifeline systems, anchorages must withstand at least two-times the maximum tension developed in the lifeline during fall arrest in the direction applied by the lifeline forces –Anchorages for rescue systems must withstand a static load of 3,000 pounds for non-certified anchorages or five-times the applied load for certified anchorages

16 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.2 (Continued) Inspections –Daily inspections of fall protection equipment and anchorages by the authorized person, or user of the equipment, as well as yearly inspection by a qualified person, competent person or competent rescuer are required –Items to verify include: Presence and legibility of markings and tags Presence of all integral components of the equipment (ex/hardware and webbing) Absence of defects and damage

17 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.2 (Continued) Rescue procedures –If emergency services are not able to answer a request for assistance in a timely manner or if they do not have adequate equipment, then companies should have in-house rescue procedures and trained personnel in place –Program effectiveness should be evaluated at regular intervals of no more than two years –If an accident occurs, the incident must be thoroughly investigated and documented promptly

18 © 2007 Capital Safety ANSI Z359.4 Safety Requirements for Assisted-Rescue and Self-Rescue Systems, Subsystems and Components Addresses safety requirements for rescue systems –Requirements for performance, design, marking, qualification, instruction, training, use, maintenance and removal from service –Equipment includes connectors, winches/hoists, descent control devices, rope tackle blocks, and self-retracting lanyards with integral rescue capability –Utilized in pre-planned self-rescue and assisted- rescue applications for 1-2 persons Rescuer must assess workplace conditions prior to selecting a rescue system –Must be based on compatibility with other fall protection equipment as well as hazards and anchorages that are present

19 © 2007 Capital Safety Values of Expanded Fall Protection Standard Provides guidance in creating fall protection programs –Clear lines of authority and responsibility –Detailed job planning and expanded training Broadens scope of standard, additional work tasks and equipment types –Work positioning and travel restraint –Rescue and rope access Improves strength and performance of fall protection equipment –Increased snaphook & carabiner gate strength –Additional testing for twin leg lanyards –Establishes requirements for positioning, restraint and rescue equipment May increase compliance and reduce number of accidents –Protects worker from potential mis-use reducing risk and liability –Hook changes reduce the chance of forced “roll-out” for added safety

20 © 2007 Capital Safety Values of Expanded Fall Protection Standard The outlook is that the Z359 family of standards will drive higher rates of compliance because the added details provide a better understanding of how to select and use equipment to keep workers safe in all types of work environments. Increasing compliance by as little as one percentage point will protect thousands of workers and could potentially save hundreds of lives.

21 © 2007 Capital Safety Capital Safety – Confidential What has Changed Z359 Fall Protection Code Version 2.0 Effective November 16, 2009 updates include: ANSI/ASSE Z “Personal Energy Absorbers and Energy Absorbing Lanyards” Establishes requirements for the performance, design, marking, qualification, instructions, inspection, maintenance and removal from service of energy absorbing lanyards and personal energy absorbers. ANSI/ASSE Z “Connecting Components for Personal Fall Arrest Systems” Establishes requirements for the performance, design, marking, qualification, test methods and removal from service of connectors. ANSI/ASSE Z “Safety Requirements for Personal Fall Arrest Systems (PFAS)” Intended for engineers with expertise in designing fall-protection systems. It specifies requirements for the design and performance of complete active fall- protection systems, including travel-restraint and vertical and horizontal fall- arrest systems..

22 © 2007 Capital Safety Capital Safety – Confidential ANSI/ASSE Z “Personal Energy Absorbers and Energy Absorbing Lanyards” Key Notes 2 new classifications: Personal Energy Absorbers “EAP’s” and Energy Absorbing Lanyards “EAL’s” Capacity range of users 130 to 310 pounds Requires all “EAP’s” and “EAL’s” to reduce the forces implied on the user to less than 10 G’s Two classes of “EAP’s”: “6 Ft FF” and “12 Ft FF” Greater elongation of the shock absorber from 42” to a maximum of 48” inches and 60” for 12 ft FF Increase in test weight from 220 to 282 lbs ( kg) Maximum arresting force on an employee is 1,800 LB. Extensive testing requirements New marking requirements

23 © 2007 Capital Safety Capital Safety – Confidential ANSI/ASSE Z “Personal Energy Absorbers and Energy Absorbing Lanyards” A 6 ft FF “EAP” shall have an average arrest force no greater than 900 pounds (4 kN) and not to exceed a MAF of 1,800 pounds (8kN). The 12 ft FF “EAP” shall have an average arrest force no greater than 1,350 pounds (6 kN) and not to exceed 1,800 pounds (8 kN) MAF. Maximum deployment distance for the 6 ft FF “EAP” is 48” (122 cm) (old was 42”)and 60” (152.4 cm) for the 12 ft FF “EAP”. The average arrest force, maximum free fall distance and capacity of an EAP needs to be on a separate label identical in size, color, and content. 6 ft FF EAP shall be in black print on a contrasting white background and the 12 ft FF EAP shall be in white print on a contrasting black background.

24 © 2007 Capital Safety Capital Safety – Confidential

25 © 2007 Capital Safety Capital Safety – Confidential ANSI/ASSE Z “Personal Energy Absorbers and Energy Absorbing Lanyards” There are a number of new testing requirements including; Ambient Dry Tests, Conditioning Tests, Abrasion Test, Static Test – Wrap-Around Energy Absorbing Lanyards, Static Test – Y-Lanyards, Dynamic Test – Dual Connection. Dynamic Test – Hip Connection The test weight shall weigh 282 pounds (128 kg) and a conversion factor of 1.1 (vs.1.4:1) is being used when comparing the rigid test weight to the human body. The test lanyard used to perform dynamic tests shall be fabricated from Type 302 stainless steel, 7x19 aircraft cable construction. The recommended load cell capacity is 3,400 pounds (15.0 kN). The accuracy of the load cell shall be +/- 0.5% of its range. Y-lanyards that fail the Dynamic Hip Test must include warning labels on both connecting ends directing users how to safely store the unused leg of the lanyard.

26 © 2007 Capital Safety Capital Safety – Confidential ANSI/ASSE Z “Personal Energy Absorbers and Energy Absorbing Lanyards”  Has added new instruction requirements (illustrations on how to calculate FF distances, and reference charts for deployment distance/user weight and ff distance.)  Outside the scope of this standard: –construction industry, body belts, window cleaning belts, chest-waist harnesses and sports-related activities. –Horizontal lifeline systems (hardware in work positioning systems IS covered by this standard

27 © 2007 Capital Safety Capital Safety – Confidential Materials: –Removed material constraints to allow for material technology expansion –Buckles, oval rings used as adjusters, and other adjusters shall be capable of withstanding a reduced minimum tensile load of 3,372 lbs. (15kN) without breaking (old is 4,000 lbs.). Hardware shall be self-closing and self-locking and require at least two consecutive and deliberate actions to be opened. Carabiners, snaphooks, D-rings and O-rings shall be proof-load tested to 3,600 lbs (16 kN), and capable of withstanding a tensile load of 5,000 lbs (22.2 kN) without breaking. Connecting devices require markings to identify 3,600 lb. load rating on the gate mechanism. ANSI/ASSE Z “Connecting Components for Personal Fall Arrest Systems”

28 © 2007 Capital Safety Capital Safety – Confidential Non-integral connectors designed and tested in accordance with Z will display the "ANSI Z359.12" marking. General Marking Requirements: Any restrictions on the use of such connectors (hardware) shall be marked on the connectors (hardware) or components, subsystems and systems of which they are an integral part Specific Marking Requirements: Connectors shall be marked to identify the following: Year of manufacture; Manufacturer’s identification; Markings for connectors shall be sufficient to provide traceability; Load rating for the major axis of the connector stamped or otherwise permanently marked on the device, minimum 22kN or 5,000 pounds. For connectors that are non-integral part (non-captive eye), then “ANSI Z359.12” is required. ANSI/ASSE Z “Connecting Components for Personal Fall Arrest Systems”

29 © 2007 Capital Safety Thank you Jeff Springer


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