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Slavery and Abolition (Chapter 8, Section 2) Essential Questions: Can you force someone to follow your beliefs? Could the Civil War have been avoided?

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Presentation on theme: "Slavery and Abolition (Chapter 8, Section 2) Essential Questions: Can you force someone to follow your beliefs? Could the Civil War have been avoided?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Slavery and Abolition (Chapter 8, Section 2) Essential Questions: Can you force someone to follow your beliefs? Could the Civil War have been avoided? 1

2 Do Now 2

3 Slavery and Abolition O Create and complete a 2-column chart listing major antislavery and proslavery actions (3 bullets for each) Antislavery ActionsProslavery Actions 3

4 Comparing Strategies Antislavery Actions Proslavery Actions O Formed anti- slavery societies O Publications, speeches and lectures O Slave rebellions O Tighter control over black people (free and slave) O Use of religion and myth to defend slavery O Gag rule to prevent debate in Congress 4

5 Frederick Douglass First Edition, December 3, 1847, Rochester, NY 1852 Speech 5

6 Uncle Tom’s Cabin (pg. 312) O Who wrote it? O What did the author hope to achieve by writing this book? O How does the author try to achieve this? 6

7 Uncle Tom’s Cabin (pg. 312) O Effects: O What effect did the novel have on the abolition movement? O How did Southerners react to it? O What effect did the book have on the conflict between the North and the South (did it make things better or worse)? 7

8 The South Responds O Read the excerpt from George Fitzhugh’s Cannibals All! and answer questions 1 – 4. 8

9 Cannibals All! “We are all, North and South, engaged in the White Slave Trade, and he who succeeds best is esteemed most respectable. It is far more cruel than the Black Slave Trade, because it exacts more of its slaves, and neither protects nor governs them....When the factory worker’s day is ended, he is free, but is overburdened with the cares of family and household, which makes his freedom an empty and delusive mockery…The Negro slave is free, too, when the labors of the day are over, and free in mind as well as body; for the master provides food, raiment (clothing), house, fuel and everything else necessary to the physical well-being of himself and his family.” 9

10 Cannibals All! “We are all, North and South, engaged in the White Slave Trade, and he who succeeds best is esteemed most respectable. It is far more cruel than the Black Slave Trade, because it exacts more of its slaves, and neither protects nor governs them....When the factory worker ’s day is ended, he is free, but is overburdened with the cares of family and household, which makes his freedom an empty and delusive mockery…The Negro slave is free, too, when the labors of the day are over, and free in mind as well as body; for the master provides food, raiment (clothing), house, fuel and everything else necessary to the physical well-being of himself and his family.” 10

11 Cannibals All! “We are all, North and South, engaged in the White Slave Trade, and he who succeeds best is esteemed most respectable. It is far more cruel than the Black Slave Trade, because it exacts more of its slaves, and neither protects nor governs them....When the factory worker’s day is ended, he is free, but is overburdened with the cares of family and household, which makes his freedom an empty and delusive mockery…The Negro slave is free, too, when the labors of the day are over, and free in mind as well as body; for the master provides food, raiment (clothing), house, fuel and everything else necessary to the physical well-being of himself and his family.” 11

12 Cannibals All! “We are all, North and South, engaged in the White Slave Trade, and he who succeeds best is esteemed most respectable. It is far more cruel than the Black Slave Trade, because it exacts more of its slaves, and neither protects nor governs them....When the factory worker’s day is ended, he is free, but is overburdened with the cares of family and household, which makes his freedom an empty and delusive mockery…The Negro slave is free, too, when the labors of the day are over, and free in mind as well as body; for the master provides food, raiment (clothing), house, fuel and everything else necessary to the physical well-being of himself and his family.” 12

13 Cannibals All! “We are all, North and South, engaged in the White Slave Trade, and he who succeeds best is esteemed most respectable. It is far more cruel than the Black Slave Trade, because it exacts more of its slaves, and neither protects nor governs them....When the factory worker’s day is ended, he is free, but is overburdened with the cares of family and household, which makes his freedom an empty and delusive mockery…The Negro slave is free, too, when the labors of the day are over, and free in mind as well as body; for the master provides food, raiment (clothing), house, fuel and everything else necessary to the physical well-being of himself and his family.” 13

14 Cannibals All! “We are all, North and South, engaged in the White Slave Trade, and he who succeeds best is esteemed most respectable. It is far more cruel than the Black Slave Trade, because it exacts more of its slaves, and neither protects nor governs them....When the factory worker’s day is ended, he is free, but is overburdened with the cares of family and household, which makes his freedom an empty and delusive mockery…The Negro slave is free, too, when the labors of the day are over, and free in mind as well as body; for the master provides food, raiment (clothing), house, fuel and everything else necessary to the physical well-being of himself and his family.” 14

15 Cannibals All! “We are all, North and South, engaged in the White Slave Trade, and he who succeeds best is esteemed most respectable. It is far more cruel than the Black Slave Trade, because it exacts more of its slaves, and neither protects nor governs them....When the factory worker’s day is ended, he is free, but is overburdened with the cares of family and household, which makes his freedom an empty and delusive mockery…The Negro slave is free, too, when the labors of the day are over, and free in mind as well as body; for the master provides food, raiment (clothing), house, fuel and everything else necessary to the physical well-being of himself and his family.” 15

16 Defending Slavery 16


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