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Long Term and Immediate Causes of the Civil War Social Studies Solutions 19-20 You need a blank piece of paper!

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Presentation on theme: "Long Term and Immediate Causes of the Civil War Social Studies Solutions 19-20 You need a blank piece of paper!"— Presentation transcript:

1 Long Term and Immediate Causes of the Civil War Social Studies Solutions You need a blank piece of paper!

2 Key EventHow does it lead to division? Compromise of 1820 Sectionalism (Slavery, Economics, Tariffs, Land, etc.) Wilmot Proviso Compromise of 1850 (Stronger Fugitive Slave Law) Uncle Tom’s Cabin Kansas-Nebraska Act Dred Scott v. Sanford Lincoln-Douglas Debates John Brown’s Raid Election of 1860

3 Review of LONG TERM causes Question of State’s Rights vs. Federal Rights Idea of Nullification Compromise of 1820 Debate over slavery Sectionalism Compromise of 1850

4 Uncle Tom’s Cabin Depicted evils of slavery to public Written by Harriet Beecher Stowe Uncle Tom, Simon Legree—characters in the book 1852—sold over 1 million copies Why? The undecided now favor anti-slavery side, angers Southerners

5 1854—popular sovereignty passed as law in Compromise of 1850 Rush to populate state with voters leads to Bleeding Kansas: abolitionist and pro-slavery sides result to violence! Foreshadows fighting in Civil War, shows popular sovereignty will not work Kansas-Nebraska Act: popular sovereignty will determine slavery in Kansas- Nebraska territory

6 Sumner/Brooks Incident — fight in the US Senate, Brooks beats Sumner with a cane for his attacks on slavery in the South, foreshadows Civil War

7 Dred Scott v. Sanford 1857 Scott is a slave  he is taken into free states  sues for freedom based on Missouri Compromise  Supreme Court (majority Southern) rules: Blacks are not citizens, slaves are property Can’t ban slavery Missouri Compromise is illegal

8 Development of Republican Party Topic of slavery has come to dominate political parties By 1850—differences have peaked within Whigs, Democrats, and Free-Soilers: those that oppose slavery form a new party The Republicans: official party policy was to oppose the growth of slavery where it didn’t already exist

9 Political Parties ( ) PartyEstablishedMajor Platform Free-Soil1848Anti-extension of slaver, pro-labor Know-Nothing1854Anti-immigration, anti- Catholic, nativism Whig1834Pro-business Divided on slavery Republican1854Opposed expansion of slavery into territories Democratic1840States’ rights Limited Govt Divided on slavery

10 Lincoln-Douglas Debates Senate Race 1858: Stephen Douglas (Democrat) and Abraham Lincoln (Republican) Debate over slavery: neither man favored slavery, so how argue it? Douglas issues: Freeport Doctrine—slavery needs certain laws in order to exist, if you don’t want slavery don’t pass the laws Douglas goes on to win election, but Lincoln gains national fame from the debates

11 John Brown’s Raid John Brown—extreme abolitionist Attempted to capture Harper’s Ferry (a military arsenal in Virginia) with the intent to arm slaves to rebel He and his men were surrounded and forced to surrender Brown found guilty and then hanged— becomes a martyr for abolitionists Southerners believe Brown represents Northerners who want control of the South

12 Southern Secession 1860 election—slavery had divided the parties: Republican Lincoln pledges to stop spread of slavery (not end it), Douglas and Breckinridge split the Democratic vote, John Bell runs under Constitutional Party LINCOLN wins election of 1860 with NO SOUTHERN ELECTORAL VOTES South secedes due to fear of no voice in gov’t and losing the only way of life (slavery) ever known Dec. 24, 1860: State of South Carolina secedes (withdraw) from the Union

13 Confederate States of America Officially formed before Lincoln takes office Jefferson Davis is elected President South Carolina leaves first followed by Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana and Texas

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15 Response of North “This country will be drenched in blood…the people of the North…are not going to let the country be destroyed without a might effort to save it…” Can the use of force preserve the nation? Lincoln says states do not have the right to secede

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17 Review Questions 1. Which event convinced many Southerners that they had lost their voice in the national government? a. The Dred Scott decision b. The issuance of the Freeport Doctrine c. John Brown’s raid at Harpers’ Ferry d. Lincoln’s election as president

18 2. Which of the following was the LEAST divisive issue in the election of 1856? a. The candidacy of James Buchanan b. The Kansas-Nebraska Act c. The expansion of slavery d. The rise of the Republican Party

19 3. Why did Kansas become a center of controversy over the issue of slavery? a. Because it extended the power of the Missouri Compromise b. Because the Kansas-Nebraska Act opened the territory to slavery and popular sovereignty c. The Know-Nothing Party disagreed with opening the territory to slavery d. All of the above

20 4. Why did most Free-Soilers object to slavery? a. They believed slavery was morally wrong b. They believed the South should be forced to industrialize c. They believed that white workers could not get jobs in competition w/ slaves d. The party actually had no opinion on slavery

21 5. What was the significance of the Dred Scott decision? a. It declared slaves were property b. It effectively repealed the Missouri Compromise c. It stated that because Scott was a slave, he had no rights in court d. All of the above

22 6. What was the significance of the election of 1856 for Abraham Lincoln? a. He won the election b. His debates against his opponent, Stephen Douglas afforded him national attention c. Stephen Douglas became president d. Lincoln learned nothing about running for office in the national spotlight

23 7. “So you’re the little lady that started this big war,” stated by Lincoln, most likely refers to whom? a. Harriet Tubman b. Harriet Beecher Stowe c. Elizabeth Cady Stanton d. Sojourner Truth

24 Civil War Timeline Part 1  Create a timeline (events must be in order by month and year)  Include 2 major facts about each event— should include significance of event!  Give your timeline a title  Include at least 3 pictures  This is the 1 st part of the timeline, you will complete the 2 nd half on Thursday. The entire timeline will count as a QUIZ GRADE!  Due at beginning of class on Friday!  John Brown’s Raid  Kansas-Nebraska Act  Compromise of 1850  Lincoln’s Election  Dred Scott v. Sanford  Compromise of 1820  Uncle Tom’s Cabin  Lincoln-Douglas Debates

25 Civil War Timeline Part 1  Create a timeline (events must be in order by month and year)  Include 2 major facts about each event— should include significance of event!  Give your timeline a title  Include at least 3 pictures  This is the 1 st part of the timeline, you will complete the 2 nd half on Thursday. The entire timeline will count as a QUIZ GRADE!  Due at beginning of class on Friday!  John Brown’s Raid  Kansas-Nebraska Act  Compromise of 1850  Lincoln’s Election  Dred Scott v. Sanford  Compromise of 1820  Uncle Tom’s Cabin  Lincoln-Douglas Debates


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