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State’s Rights Slavery Nullification Sectionalism Compromise of 1820 Compromise of 1850 Underground Railroad Fugitive Slave Law Long Term Uncle Tom’s Cabin.

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Presentation on theme: "State’s Rights Slavery Nullification Sectionalism Compromise of 1820 Compromise of 1850 Underground Railroad Fugitive Slave Law Long Term Uncle Tom’s Cabin."— Presentation transcript:

1 State’s Rights Slavery Nullification Sectionalism Compromise of 1820 Compromise of 1850 Underground Railroad Fugitive Slave Law Long Term Uncle Tom’s Cabin Kansas-Nebraska Act Dred Scott v. Sanford Development of Republican party Lincoln-Douglas Debates John Brown’s Raids Southern Secession Lincoln’s Election Immediate

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3 Long Term State’s RightsSlaveryNullificationSectionalism Compromise of 1820 Compromise of 1850 Underground Railroad Fugitive Slave Law

4 10 th Amendment – he Tenth Amendment restates the Constitution's principle of Federalism by providing that powers not granted to the National government nor prohibited to the states are reserved to the states and to the people. Idea of nullification – Says a state can ignore federal laws if they feel it goes against the Constitution.

5 Pro-slavery Anti-slavery Opposed growth of slavery Slave Codes

6 Sedition Acts Tariff laws (High vs. Low) South wanted low North wanted High Slavery issues Most Northerners wanted to get rid of slavery Southerners thought it was part of their way of life

7 Issues become more and more regional in nature Slavery, tariffs, economics Industrial north Agricultural south

8 Also called Missouri Compromise Drew a line to determine the future areas of slavery Solved the slavery debate for about 20 years

9 Wilmot Proviso tried to block slavery in old Mexican areas but is defeated in Congress Wilmot Proviso California applies for statehood  Debate begins and Clay organizes compromise California admitted as free state South gets stronger Fugitive law Popular Sovereignty to help decide future cases of slavery Popular Sovereignty

10 Many early attempts at escape relied on luck Network of anti-slavery advocates who helped slaves escape Many times slaves needed to get to Canada to be totally free Harriet Tubman

11 Allowed slave catchers to go into free areas and capture runaway slaves Made it a crime to help any runaway Suspected slaves need not be given a trial or a chance to testify

12 were laws each US state had defining the status of slaves and the rights of masters; the code gave slave owners near- absolute power over the right of their human property.

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14 ( ), herself an escaped slave, was a hero of the abolitionist movement. She secretly returned to the South nineteen times in order to lead other slaves to freedom by way of the Underground Railroad.

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16 The intent of the proviso, submitted by Democratic Congressman David Wilmot, was to prevent the introduction of slavery in any territory acquired from Mexico. Many consider it as the one of first events on the long slide to secession and Civil War which would accelerate through the 1850s.

17 The people living in newly acquired areas would vote on whether or not to allow slavery.

18 Uncle Tom’s Cabin Kansas- Nebraska Act Dred Scott v. Sanford Republican Party Lincoln- Douglas Debates John Brown’s Raid Southern Secession Lincoln’s Election

19 Harriet Beecher Stowe Dipicted evil side of slavery to the public – “Uncle Tom” – “Simon Legree” 1852, sold over a million copies

20 1854—popular sovereignty passed as law in 1850 compromise to determine slaverypopular sovereignty Rush to populate state with “voters” for each side “Bleeding Kansas” – Slavery and abolitionist forces resort to violence A fight in the U.S. Senate – Preston Brooks v. Charles Sumner Preston Brooks v. Charles Sumner

21 Scott is a slave He is taken into free states Sues for freedom based on NW Ordinance and Missouri CompromiseMissouri Compromise Supreme Court (majority of southern justices) rules:  Blacks are not citizens  Can’t ban slavery  Missouri Compromise is illegal

22 Slavery had come to dominate the differences in the parties By 1850 the differences had peaked so that anti-slavery Whigs, Democrats, and Free-Soilers formed a new anti-slavery party Official party policy was to oppose the growth of slavery where it did not exist.

23 Senate race in 1858 – Stephen Douglas (Dem), Abraham Lincoln (Rep) Debate over slavery issues – Neither man wanted slavery in the area but how to do it? Douglas issues Freeport DoctrineFreeport Doctrine – Slavery needs certain laws in order to exist. Don’t pass those laws and there will be no slavery Douglas wins the election, Lincoln gains national fame

24 John Brown was an extreme abolitionist Captured Harper’s Ferry military installation in Virginia with intent to arm slaves Surrounded and forced to surrender Brown found guilty at trial and then hanged— becomes a martyr for many abolitionists Many Southerners thought Brown represented northerners who wanted to control the southern lifestyle and economy Pic

25 1860 election Slavery divided the parties – Lincoln pledges to stop spread of slavery but not to interfere with the south – Douglas got support of Northern Democrats – John Breckinridge got southern Democrats – John Bell nominated by Constitutional Union Party

26 Lincoln wins election with no southern electoral votes Southern states secede in fear of gov’t where they have no voice  S.C. first to secede, 6 others follow Confederate States of America formed before Lincoln takes office  Jefferson Davis elected Confederate President

27 was a series of violent events, involving Free-Staters (anti-slavery) and pro-slavery "Border Ruffian" elements, that took place in the Kansas Territory and the western frontier towns of the U.S. state of Missouri. These incidents were attempts to influence whether Kansas would enter the Union as a free or slave state.

28 Preston Brooks v. Charles Sumner Brooks attacks Sumner on the Senate floor nearly killing him for speaking out against the Kansas-Nebraska Act. This was a brutal example of how inflamed passions had become over the slavery issue.

29 The people living in newly acquired areas would vote on whether or not to allow slavery.

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31 The Missouri Compromise was an agreement passed in 1820 between the pro-slavery and anti-slavery factions in the United States Congress, involving primarily the regulation of slavery in the western territories. It prohibited slavery in the former Louisiana Territory north of the parallel 36°30' north except within the boundaries of the proposed state of Missouri.

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33 was an American author and abolitionist, whose novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) attacked the cruelty of slavery. It made the political issues of the 1850s regarding slavery tangible to millions, energizing anti-slavery forces in the American North. It angered and embittered the South. "So you're the little woman who wrote the book that made this great war!"

34 Stephen A. Douglas' response to Lincoln stated that despite the court's ruling (Dred Scott), slavery could be prevented from any territory by the refusal of the people living in that territory to pass laws favorable to slavery. Likewise, if the people of the territory supported slavery, legislation would provide for its continued existence.

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