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RISK MANAGEMENT AND SAFETY PRESENTS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN INDIANA DRIVER AWARENESS PROGRAM.

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Presentation on theme: "RISK MANAGEMENT AND SAFETY PRESENTS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN INDIANA DRIVER AWARENESS PROGRAM."— Presentation transcript:

1 RISK MANAGEMENT AND SAFETY PRESENTS UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN INDIANA DRIVER AWARENESS PROGRAM

2 We may not all be “professional drivers,” but most of us drive everyday. Driving may be a critical part of our daily lives.

3 Traffic accidents are the number one cause of death on the job. They: Claim more than 30,000 lives each year. Cause more than a million injuries.

4 MOST ACCIDENTS ARE CAUSED BY ONE OF FOUR “HUMAN FACTORS”: Distraction Frustration Fatigue Alcohol/Drug Use

5 WHEN WE ARE DRIVING, DISTRACTION CAN COME IN MANY FORMS: Eating. Reading a map. Talking on the phone. Pull over to do these types of things.

6 THE USE OF ALCOHOL AND/OR DRUGS IS A FACTOR IN OVER 50% OF ALL FATAL ACCIDENTS: Both can slow down your reflexes and impair judgment. Each person handles alcohol differently (so, “counting drinks” does not work effectively.) If you do drink, designate a non-drinking driver or take public transportation.

7 Stress, frustration or anger can cause you to lose focus. If you feel out of control, pause and count to ten. If you feel drowsy, open a window or turn on the radio. If necessary, find a rest stop and take a break. Staying calm and alert is also critical for safe driving:

8 DRIVING PREPARATION Inspect vehicle before starting out. Become familiar with operating a van. Check for basic emergency gear. Listen to the weather report.

9 INSPECT YOUR TIRES BEFORE YOU START OUT: Check tires for proper inflation. Check tires for adequate tread. Check headlights and directional flashers. Replace any burned out bulbs immediately.

10 ALL VEHICLES SHOULD BE EQUIPPED WITH BASIC EMERGENCY GEAR: A spare tire, jack and tire iron. Jumper cables. Flashlight. First aid kit. Motor oil and warning markers may also come in handy.

11 SINCE PEOPLE COME IN DIFFERENT SHAPES AND SIZES, YOU NEED TO MAKE THE VEHICLE SUIT YOUR BODY: Adjust the seats so you feel comfortable and can easily reach the pedals. Position the mirrors to reduce “blind spots.” Vans and trucks often have special considerations.

12 EVERY VEHICLE HANDLES A LITTLE DIFFERENTLY, SO BECOME FAMILIAR WITH THE VEHICLE YOU ARE DRIVING BEFORE ENTERING TRAFFIC: Go for a test drive in a parking lot first. Check blind spots before backing up. Test both the steering and brakes. Keep in mind - larger, heavier vehicles make wider turns and require more stopping distance.

13 BASIC DRIVING RULES Wear a seat belt at all times. Obey all speed limits and traffic signs. Signal all turns and lane changes early. Keep your eyes on the road. Remain calm.

14 WEARING A SEATBELT IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT SAFETY ISSUES WHEN DRIVING A VEHICLE. IN AN ACCIDENT: It prevents you from smashing into the steering wheel, dashboard or windshield. It may help prevent internal injury to your organs and skeletal system. When wearing a seatbelt, you are twice as likely to survive a crash.

15 SIGNS AND OTHER INDICATORS ARE DESIGNED TO MAKE DRIVING LESS DANGEROUS FOR ALL OF US: Obey all speed limit and traffic signs. Especially important to drive at or below posted limits for winding roads or those with turns which are not safe at high speeds. Solid lines down the center of the road mean “Do Not Pass”. Broken lines mean “Pass With Care”.

16 SIGNAL ALL TURNS AND LANES CHANGES EARLY: Indicates your intentions to other vehicles. Gives others time to react.

17 DEFENSIVE DRIVING Maintaining a safety cushion around your vehicle. How to safely pass another vehicle. Four second rule. Side space. Be aware of tailgaters.

18 “DEFENSIVE DRIVING” INCLUDES KEEPING YOUR EYES ON THE ROAD AND WATCHING FOR TROUBLE IN ALL DIRECTIONS: Look for brake lights several cars ahead. Keep a “safety cushion” (empty space) around your vehicle at all times.

19 THE “FOUR SECOND RULE” WILL HELP YOU MAINTAIN A SAFE FOLLOWING DISTANCE: When the vehicle ahead of you passes a landmark, count how many seconds it takes you to reach that same point. If it is less than four seconds, you are following too close.

20 IT IS ESPECIALLY IMPORTANT NOT TO TAILGATE A TRUCK: A truck will block more of your view of the road ahead. If you are too close, the truck’s brake lights will be the only warning of trouble ahead. Adjust your following distance to see around the truck (this allows you more time to react).

21 THE OPEN AREA BESIDE YOUR VEHICLE IS CALLED “SIDE SPACE”: Maintaining this cushion gives you more room to maneuver if another vehicle drifts into your lane.

22 WATCH OUT FOR “BUFFETING” WHEN TRUCKS PASS: Trucks create wind currents which can push your vehicle off course. Maintaining ample side space can minimize this problem.

23 KEEPING A PROPER SAFETY CUSHION ALSO MEANS PAYING ATTENTION TO THE VEHICLE BEHIND YOU: Periodically check your mirror and “blind spots” to be alert for traffic around you.

24 SOMEONE TAILGATING YOU CAN BE DANGEROUS: Your vehicle could be rear-ended if you brake suddenly. Never increase speed to satisfy a tailgater. Reduce speed and let them pass.

25 PASSING ANOTHER VEHICLE CAN ALSO REDUCE YOUR RISK OF AN ACCIDENT: Check the road to see if there is adequate passing room. Turn on your signal before you pull out of your lane. Do not linger in another driver’s blind spot. Pass quickly, but do not cut off another vehicle when pulling into their lane.

26 TRUCKS Buffeting. Blind spots. Tailgating a truck. Braking distance.

27 TRUCKS HAVE LARGER BLIND SPOTS AND REQUIRE MORE DISTANCE TO STOP THAN CARS: It takes longer to pass a truck. Do not drive beside a truck for a long time. Never cut off a truck when moving back into their lane. A loaded rig traveling at 50 miles per hour needs 300 feet to stop…..the length of a football field.

28 DRIVING UNDER ADVERSE CONDITIONS Fog. Snow and Ice. Rain. Night driving.

29 DRIVING CONDITIONS WILL DICTATE HOW TO SAFELY HANDLE YOUR VEHICLE: Make concessions for the weather. Listen to the radio for information on weather and delays. Allow extra time to reach your destination. Alternate routes may be necessary.

30 “VISIBILITY” IS BEING ABLE TO SEE AND BE SEEN BY OTHERS. MAKE SURE IMPORTANT PARTS OF YOUR VEHICLE ARE CLEAN AND CLEAR, INCLUDING THE: Windshield. Headlights. Taillights. Turn Signals.

31 EXERCISE CAUTION ON SLIPPERY ROADS: Reduce speed. Increase following distance. Slow down before turns. Apply brake sooner. Brake slowly. Avoid puddles and icy patches.

32 DUSK AND DAWN ARE THE MOST DANGEROUS TIMES TO DRIVE : It is too dark to see clearly. But there is too much light for headlights to be effective. Turning on your headlights allows the other driver to see you.

33 AT NIGHT, THE FARTHER YOU CAN SEE, THE MORE TIME YOU WILL HAVE TO REACT TO TROUBLE: Use high beams as often as possible. Use low beams when behind other vehicles, facing oncoming traffic, or driving in snow or fog.

34 REMEMBER TO REDUCE YOUR SPEED WHEN USING LOW BEAMS: You cannot see as far, so there is less time to react. Slowing down gives you more reaction time.

35 HANDLE A VEHICLE IN AN EMERGENCY Icy patch. Hydroplaning. Blow out. Reduced visibility.

36 NO MATTER HOW CAREFULLY WE DRIVE, SOMETIMES THE UNEXPECTED HAPPENS. Act fast, but remain calm and in control of the situation.

37 FRICTION BETWEEN YOUR TIRES AND THE ROAD SURFACE KEEPS YOUR VEHICLE ON COURSE. IT: Propels you forward. Allows you to steer.

38 AN ICY PATCH COULD CAUSE ONE OR MORE WHEELS TO LOSE CONTACT WITH THE ROAD: Momentum takes over and your vehicle begins to skid. Do not slam on the brakes. Ease your foot off the gas pedal.

39 COMPENSATE FOR SKIDDING BY STEERING IN THE DIRECTION OF THE SKID. If the back of the vehicle skids to the right, steer to the right. Steer to the left if the back skids to the left.

40 WHEN THE ROADS ARE WET, TIRE TREAD CHANNELS WATER OUT OF THE WAY. As speed increases and more ground is covered, tires need to channel more water. At high speeds even small puddles can overpower the treads, causing, “hydroplaning.” When this happens, tires lift completely off the road surface. Do not brake. Instead ease off the gas pedal.

41 A “BLOW-OUT” IS A RAPID LOSS OF AIR FROM YOUR TIRE. Increased friction pulls the vehicle toward the side of the blow-out.

42 IF A BLOW-OUT OCCURS: Do not hit the brakes (the vehicle will “pull” more violently.) Accelerate to reduce the pull to the side. Keep a firm grip on the wheel. Steer to the side opposite the blow-out. Slow down and turn on your hazard flashers. Pull over to a safe, level area to fix the tire.

43 WHAT TO DO IF AN ACCIDENT OCCURS: On Campus: Call Public Safety: 7777 or Do not leave the scene. Exchange important information. Report accident to supervisor. Supervisor reports accident to Risk Management. Off Campus: Contact the police. Do not leave the scene. Exchange important information. Report accident to supervisor. Supervisor reports accident to Risk Management.

44 REVIEW Accidents are the number one cause of death on the job. Driving safely is not just for professionals. Stay focused, alert and sober when driving. Take time to inspect your vehicle and learn how it handles. Always wear your seat belt. Obey speed limits, traffic signs and signals. Make allowances for poor road conditions. Know how to handle your vehicle in emergencies.

45 MANAGER OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY BRYAN MORRISON


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