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Formation of Yes/No Questions and Negation (La formación de preguntas de sí o no, y la negación)

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Presentation on theme: "Formation of Yes/No Questions and Negation (La formación de preguntas de sí o no, y la negación)"— Presentation transcript:

1 Formation of Yes/No Questions and Negation (La formación de preguntas de sí o no, y la negación)

2 In spoken and written Spanish, statements are normally formed by placing the subject at the beginning of the sentence, followed by the verb and an object, if any. Érica habla francés. ¿Habla Érica francés? Statements versus Questions Questions that require a yes-or-no answer are often formed by placing the subject after the verb, especially when requesting new information. Does Érica speak French?

3 In spoken Spanish, all yes-or-no questions are identified by rising intonation at the end of the question, regardless of word order. ¿Habla Érica francés? Statements versus Questions ¿Érica habla francés? To express disbelief about information already given, maintain the word order for statements, but with rising intonation (called an echo question). Érica speaks French? (Really?)

4 A yes-or-no question can also be formed by adding a tag word or phrase at the end of a statement. Tag questions are also used to confirm given information and have rising intonation over the tag itself. Érica habla francés, ¿no? Statements versus Questions Érica habla francés, ¿verdad? Érica habla francés, ¿no es así? Érica speaks French, right? Érica speaks French, doesn’t she? Érica speaks French, isn’t that so?

5 Question Marks and Intonation (Los signos de interrogación y la entonación) An inverted question mark (¿) is always placed at the beginning of a question word or phrase, and another right-side-up question mark (?) at the end. While in English, word order or the helper verb do normally indicate a question, in Spanish, word order for questions and statements can be identical, and Spanish has no equivalent to the helper verb do. Thus, in written Spanish, the inverted question mark alerts the reader that a question follows. ¿Cómo? Pardon? How’s that again? ¿Cómo es tu profesor? What is your professor like? Juan speaks English. Juan habla inglés. Does Juan speak English? ¿Juan habla inglés?

6 Question Marks and Intonation (Los signos de interrogación y la entonación) Again, with yes-or-no questions in spoken Spanish, the speaker’s intonation is the indicator of the question. With questions that do not require yes or no in the answer, intonation is not an indicator; instead, we listen for the question word at or near the beginning of the phrase. ¿Eres estudiante? Are you a student? Eres estudiante. You are a student. Where is he from? ¿De dónde es? He’s from California. Es de California.

7 Negation We make a sentence negative in Spanish by simply placing no before the verb. Érica no habla francés. Érica doesn’t speak French. Be careful, though. In Spanish, the no is always before the verb, even when its equivalent (not, etc.) is after the verb in English. Nosotros no somos de España. We are not from Spain.

8 Negation When we answer a yes-or-no question negatively, the word no followed by a comma also precedes the verb phrase. ¿Habla Érica francés? No, no habla francés. The first no simply negates the question. The second no is the equivalent of doesn’t. No,she doesn’t speak French.

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