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1600s – Demand for clothing from Europe; recommended that newcomers bring own clothing; used to label adulterers; wigs are banned 1700s – High-wasted.

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Presentation on theme: "1600s – Demand for clothing from Europe; recommended that newcomers bring own clothing; used to label adulterers; wigs are banned 1700s – High-wasted."— Presentation transcript:

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2 1600s – Demand for clothing from Europe; recommended that newcomers bring own clothing; used to label adulterers; wigs are banned 1700s – High-wasted Empire dress introduced; women communicate styling information through the use of fashion plates

3 1830 – France is declared the center of fashion by Godeys Ladys Book; Button fly pants are forbidden by the Mormons; rubber is introduced for elastic fabrics and corsets Petticoats change style; synthetic materials arise 1850 – Synthetics are used as alternate fabric; department stores are opening in USA; bloomers raise controversy; hoop skirts instead of petticoats; synthetic dye invented

4 1863 – first bra invented 1870 – Paper patterns available 1885 – Bloomingdales mail-order catalog 1886 – Sears Roebuck mail-order; Levi Strauss designs logo 1890 – Levi 501 Jeans; Rayon is invented by Rene de Reaumur

5 1919 – Navy comes up with the T-shirt 1932 – The T-shirt is introduced to the public 1939 – Glamour magazine is in print 1940 – Board shorts are born 1943 – Zoot Suit riots / banned 1944 – Pedal pushers created 1993 – Grunge style is introduced

6 Bilateral treaty signed with Vietnam Saggy/baggy pants and public display of undergarments are outlawed in several small towns in USA Lingerie industry increases to $13 billion a year Vogue reaches 1.28 million in circulation

7 1. London, England 2. New York, USA 3. Barcelona, Spain 4. Paris, France 5. Madrid, Spain 6. Rome, Italy 7. Sao Paulo, Brazil 8. Milan, Italy 9. Los Angeles, USA 10. Berlin, Germany

8 Calvin Klein, American Donatella Versace, Italian Giorgio Armani, Italian Valentino Garavani, Italian Gabrielle Coco Chanel, French Ralph Lauren, American Kate Spade, American Marc Jacobs, American Tom Ford, American Betsey Johnson, American

9 Introductory phase Acceptance phase Rejection phase Introduction Rise (increase in sales) Peak Decline Rejection

10 Introduction – new style is originated Rise – manufactures adapt new style Acceptance (peak) – adapted style is popularized / mass production Decline – style declines in popularity Rejection – style is abandoned

11 A fashion that is taken up with great enthusiasm for a brief period of time; a craze. Silly Bands Parachute pants Leg warmers Stirrup pants Large sweaters Pegged pants

12 The combination of distinctive features (lines or characteristics) that personifies a particular person, group, school, or era.

13 Adhering to established standards; first or highest quality.

14 A substance, such as a dye, pigment, or paint that imparts a hue. Adds visual intensity and variety.

15 A structure of interwoven fibers or other elements; the feel of a fabric or surface.

16 A representation of such a part or portion; small-elaborated element of a work of art, craft or design

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18 Assistant Designer Associate Designer Designer Design Director Technical Designer CAD Designer Production Manager Textile Buyer Fashion Forecaster

19 Assistant Merchandiser Associate Merchandiser VP of Merchandising/Design Merchandise Manager Visual Merchandiser/Display Director Product Specialist Personal Shopper/Wardrobe Consultant Department Manager Store Manager Showroom Representative Director of Customer Relations/Sales Merchandiser Manufacturing Executive

20 Fashion Show Producer Fashion Director/Coordinator Event Coordinator Advertising Account Executive Public Relations Specialist Beauty Adviser Stylist Fashion Editor trends?page=5

21 Management Consultant Marketing Executive Brand Manager Market Research Analyst International Marketing Director Entrepreneur Internet Account Coordinator E-Commerce Catalog Manager Internet Marketing Coordinator

22 Near Future Cowgirl boots Suits that can be worn separately Fashion inspired by the Mediterranean Far Future Technology driven Recycled clothing Clothing to keep you safe


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