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Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.

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Presentation on theme: "Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved."— Presentation transcript:

1 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved.

2 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. The style or styles most popular at a given time. Implies: - style - change - acceptance - taste

3 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Interpret fashion ideas into new styles and offer to the public Designs that have the same characteristics are referred to as a style; may come or go in fashion, but the specific style always remains that style. Personal style created by wearing clothes suited to oneself

4 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Constant change in fashion Newness stimulates buying Changes because Reflects change in lifestyle and events People need change Boredom Sense of timing is important

5 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Implies consumers must buy and wear a style to make it a fashion Purchases by a large group of people must occur Degree of acceptance provides clues to upcoming trends

6 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Sensitivity to what is beautiful and appropriate Changes over time

7 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Introduction of a style Increase in popularity Decline in popularity Rejection of a style or Obsolescence

8 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved.

9 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Classics Fads: Short lived fashions Cycles within cycles: Design elements {color, texture, or silhouette} Recurring cycles

10 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved.

11 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Fashion Leaders Fashion Innovators Fashion Motivators Fashion Followers Fashion Victim

12 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. The Traditional Theory Trickle-Down Theory Based on the traditional process of copying and adapting trendsetting fashion from Paris, Milan, London, and New York designers Reverse Adoption Theory Trickle-Up Theory/ Bottom-Up Theory Designers pay attention to what people are wearing Mass Dissemination Theory Trickle-Across Theory Manufacturers look at celebrities and copy hot new styles instantly to meet customer demands

13 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Innovation Covered by Trade Publications Worn by Fashion Leaders Covered in Magazines Worn by Fashion Conscious Versions and Adaptations at Lower Prices Covered in Local Newspapers Worn by Fashion Followers Cheap Knockoffs- Loses Style and Fit People Tire of itCloseout Sales Innovators/Leaders moved onto new looks

14 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. To fill an emotional need To be attractive To be fashionable To impress others To be accepted To fill basic life-style needs

15 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Perceived value: looking for their idea of quality at reasonable prices Item buying: buying only one item, to update wardrobe Multiple use clothing: comfortable, functional, multiple-use Wear now: buying closer to need, will wear immediately Convenience Service: personal service and in-stock assortments

16 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Color Texture Style

17 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Brand/Designer Label Fabric: Performance and care Quality and durability Price Fit Comfort Appropriateness

18 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Dresses Social Apparel Suits Outerwear Sportswear Activewear Swimwear Lingerie Accessories

19 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved.

20 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Couture/Luxury Made to order to fit an individual client $5,000-$50,000 Designer Ready-to-wear from successful designers $1,000-$5,000 Bridge Less expensive alternatives to designer fashion Donna Karans DKNY, Marc by Marc Jacobs Contemporary: Revived category aimed at style-conscious women who want more fashion than misses style provides BCBG, Max Studio, Theory Misses More conservative adaptations or accepted designer looks Liz Claiborn, Lauren/Ralph Lauren Junior Young styling for a young figure Resulted from the high birthrate in 1980s

21 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Tailored clothing Furnishings Dress shirts, neckwear, underwear, hoisery, robes, pajamas, shoes, and boots Sportswear Active Sportswear windbreakers, ski jackets, joggings suits Work clothes Accessories

22 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Designer Traditional Styling Classic suit and sportswear Traditional sportswear Contemporary Less expensive than designer apparel

23 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Custom-tailored More than $3,000 Designer ready-made $500-$1,000 Bridge suits Step down in price from designer Moderate suits Suits: $325-$650; Jackets $200-$450 Popularly priced suits Less than $325

24 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Girls dresses Boys traditional Swimwear Outerwear Sleepwear Accessories

25 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Newborn sizes 0-11; months Infant sizes months Toddler sizes 2T, 3T, 4T Separation of sizes for boys and girls Girls 4-6X, preteens 6-14 Boys 4-7 and 8-20

26 Frings: Fashion From Concept to Consumer, 9 th ed. © 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. Better Tommy Hilfiger Moderate Esprit, Osh Kosh BGosh Budget Carters, Rampage


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