Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which of the following rulers is an example of a politique? 1.Mary I 2.Elizabeth I 3.Philip II 4.Oliver Cromwell 12.01 Q.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which of the following rulers is an example of a politique? 1.Mary I 2.Elizabeth I 3.Philip II 4.Oliver Cromwell 12.01 Q."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which of the following rulers is an example of a politique? 1.Mary I 2.Elizabeth I 3.Philip II 4.Oliver Cromwell Q

2 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which of the following rulers is an example of a politique? 1.Mary I 2.Elizabeth I 3.Philip II 4.Oliver Cromwell A

3 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Which of the following rulers is an example of a politique? 2.Elizabeth I Religious strife and civil war were best held in check where rulers tended to subordinate theological doctrine to political unity, urging tolerance, moderation, and compromiseeven indifferencein religious matters. Rulers of this kind came to be known as politiques, and the most successful among them was Elizabeth I of England E

4 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. During the reign of Francis II, all of the following families competed for control of France EXCEPT: 1.the Guises 2.the Montmorency-Chatillons 3.the Bourbons 4.the Habsburgs Q

5 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. During the reign of Francis II, all of the following families competed for control of France EXCEPT: 1.the Guises 2.the Montmorency-Chatillons 3.the Bourbons 4.the Habsburgs A

6 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: During the reign of Francis II, all of the following families competed for control of France EXCEPT: 4. the Habsburgs During a tournament held to celebrate the marriage of his thirteen- year-old daughter to Philip II, the son of Charles V and heir to the Spanish Habsburg lands, the French king, Henry II, was mortally wounded when a lance pierced his visor. This unforeseen event brought to the throne his sickly fifteen-year old son, Francis II, who died after reigning only a year (1559– 1560). With the monarchy weakened, three powerful families saw their chance to control France and began to compete for the young kings ear: the Bourbons, whose power lay in the south and west; the Montmorency-Chatillons, who controlled the center of France; and the strongest among them, Guises, who were dominant in eastern France E

7 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Edict of Nantes: 1.gave Huguenots qualified religious freedoms 2.established universal religious toleration in France 3.settled the border between France and Spain 4.ended French involvement in northern Italy Q

8 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Edict of Nantes: 1.gave Huguenots qualified religious freedoms 2.established universal religious toleration in France 3.settled the border between France and Spain 4.ended French involvement in northern Italy A

9 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The Edict of Nantes: 1.gave Huguenots qualified religious freedoms In 1591, Henry IV had already assured the Huguenots of at least qualified religious freedoms. The Edict of Nantes made good that promise. It recognized minority religious rights within what was to remain an officially Catholic country. This religious truceand it was never more than thatgranted the Huguenots, who by this time numbered well over a million, freedom of public worship, the right of assembly, admission to public offices and universities, and permission to maintain fortified towns E

10 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Henry III of France was succeeded by: 1.the Duke de Alba 2.Louis de Guise 3.Henry of Navarre 4.Charles de Bourbon Q

11 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Henry III of France was succeeded by: 1.the Duke de Alba 2.Louis de Guise 3.Henry of Navarre 4.Charles de Bourbon A

12 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Henry III of France was succeeded by: 3.Henry of Navarre As Henry III prepared to attack the Guise stronghold of Paris, an enraged Dominican friar killed Henry III. Thereupon, the Bourbon Huguenot Henry of Navarre succeeded the childless Valois king to the French throne as Henry IV (r. 1589–1610) E

13 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which region was the center of Philip IIs power in Spain? 1.Grenada 2.Catalonia 3.Castile 4.Andalucía Q

14 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which region was the center of Philip IIs power in Spain? 1.Grenada 2.Catalonia 3.Castile 4.Andalucía A

15 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Which region was the center of Philip IIs power in Spain? 3.Castile Until the English defeated the mighty Spanish Armada in 1588, no one person stood larger in the second half of the sixteenth century than Philip II of Spain. Philip was heir to the intensely Catholic and militarily supreme western Habsburg kingdom. Populous and wealthy Castile gave Philip a solid home base E

16 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. During the first half of his reign, Phillip II focused on: 1.events in Germany 2.the Netherlands 3.England 4.the Mediterranean and the Turkish threat Q

17 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. During the first half of his reign, Phillip II focused on: 1.events in Germany 2.the Netherlands 3.England 4.the Mediterranean and the Turkish threat A

18 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: During the first half of his reign, Phillip II focused on: 4.the Mediterranean and the Turkish threat During the first half of Philips reign, attention focused almost exclusively on the Mediterranean and the Turkish threat. By history, geography, and choice, Spain had traditionally been Catholic Europes champion against Islam E

19 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Duke of Alba led an army meant to: 1.suppress Protestant rebels in the Netherlands 2.conquer the Basque country 3.invade England 4.cement Spanish control of the Americas Q

20 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Duke of Alba led an army meant to: 1.suppress Protestant rebels in the Netherlands 2.conquer the Basque country 3.invade England 4.cement Spanish control of the Americas A

21 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The Duke of Alba led an army meant to: 1. suppress Protestant rebels in the Netherlands Philip, determined to make an example of the Protestant rebels, dispatched the duke of Alba to suppress the revolt. His army of 10,000 journeyed northward from Milan in 1567 in a show of combined Spanish and papal might. A special tribunal, known to the Spanish as the Council of Troubles and among the Netherlanders as the Council of Blood, reigned over the land. Before Albas reign of terror ended, the counts of Egmont and Horn and several thousand suspected heretics were publicly executed E

22 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The northern provinces of the Netherlands formed the: 1.Union of Arras 2.Union of Utrecht 3.Hanseatic League 4.New Dutch Republic Q

23 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The northern provinces of the Netherlands formed the: 1.Union of Arras 2.Union of Utrecht 3.Hanseatic League 4.New Dutch Republic A

24 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The northern provinces of the Netherlands formed the: 2.Union of Utrecht In January 1579, the southern provinces formed the Union of Arras, and soon made peace with Spain. These provinces later served the cause of the Counter-Reformation. The northern provinces responded by forming the Union of Utrecht E

25 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Mary Stuart was the daughter of King James V of Scotland and: 1.Catherine of Castile 2.Maria von Habsburg 3.Anne of Cleves 4.Mary of Guise Q

26 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Mary Stuart was the daughter of King James V of Scotland and: 1.Catherine of Castile 2.Maria von Habsburg 3.Anne of Cleves 4.Mary of Guise A

27 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Mary Stuart was the daughter of King James V of Scotland and: 4. Mary of Guise Mary Stuart was the daughter of King James V of Scotland and Mary of Guise and had resided in France from the time she was six years old. This thoroughly French and Catholic queen had returned to Scotland after the death of her husband, the French king Francis II, in E

28 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Frederick III, ruler of the Palatinate, was a devout: 1.Lutheran 2.Catholic 3.Calvinist 4.Jansenist Q

29 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Frederick III, ruler of the Palatinate, was a devout: 1.Lutheran 2.Catholic 3.Calvinist 4.Jansenist Q

30 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: Frederick III, ruler of the Palatinate, was a devout: 3.Calvinist Unrecognized as a legal religion by the Peace of Augsburg, it gained a strong foothold within the empire when Frederick III (r. 1559–1576), a devout convert to Calvinism, became Elector Palatine (ruler within the Palatinate) and made it the official religion of his domain E

31 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Thirty Years War broke out first in: 1.Prussia 2.Bavaria 3.Bohemia 4.Saxony Q

32 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. The Thirty Years War broke out first in: 1.Prussia 2.Bavaria 3.Bohemia 4.Saxony A

33 © 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. EXPLANATION: The Thirty Years War broke out first in: 3. Bohemia The war broke out in Bohemia after the ascent to the Bohemian throne in 1618 of the Habsburg Ferdinand, archduke of Styria, who was also heir to the imperial throne E


Download ppt "© 2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Which of the following rulers is an example of a politique? 1.Mary I 2.Elizabeth I 3.Philip II 4.Oliver Cromwell 12.01 Q."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google