Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Operant Conditioning Module 16 Demo Activity HO 16.1 Pkt. p. 7 See outline in pkt. p. 6 ½ DVD: Discovering Psychology: Disc 2: “Learning”

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Operant Conditioning Module 16 Demo Activity HO 16.1 Pkt. p. 7 See outline in pkt. p. 6 ½ DVD: Discovering Psychology: Disc 2: “Learning”"— Presentation transcript:

1 Operant Conditioning Module 16 Demo Activity HO 16.1 Pkt. p. 7 See outline in pkt. p. 6 ½ DVD: Discovering Psychology: Disc 2: “Learning”

2 Edward Thorndike ( ) Introduced the “Law of Effect” Behaviors with favorable consequences will occur more frequently. Behaviors with unfavorable consequences will occur less frequently. Developed into Operant Conditioning Created puzzle boxes for research on cats

3 Thorndike’s Puzzle Box

4 Operant Conditioning A type of learning in which the frequency of a behavior depends on the consequence that follows that behavior The frequency will if the consequence is reinforcing to the subject. The frequency will if the consequence is not reinforcing to the subject.

5 B.F. Skinner ( ) Developed the fundamental principles and techniques of operant conditioning. Devised ways to apply these principles in the real world. Designed the Skinner Box.

6 Reinforcement v Punishment Reinforcement - Any consequence that increases the likelihood of the behavior to be repeated. Punishment - Any consequence that decreases the likelihood of the behavior to be repeated.

7 I.Reinforcement A. Types of Reinforcement

8 1. Positive Reinforcement Anything that increases the likelihood of a behavior by following it with a desirable event or state The subject receives something they want Will strengthen the behavior

9 Positive Reinforcement

10 Operant Conditioning Activity: Positive Reinforcement Get in groups of three. Choose who will be the recorder, the experimenter, and the subject. Subjects please leave the room for a moment. Directions……

11 2. Negative Reinforcement Anything that increases the likelihood of a behavior by following it with the removal of an undesirable event or state Something the subject doesn’t like is removed Will strengthen the behavior (Definition of Reinforcement) OR X X

12 Negative Reinforcement

13 Positive/Negative Reinforcement Pkt.p. 10: HO 16-4 Negative Reinforcement “Quiz” Review Homework: Worksheet #2 from Mrs. Schneider: “Negative Reinforcement Examples”

14 Operant Conditioning Computer Lab & Activities PsychSim Operant Conditioning Maze Lab Clicker Training Pkt. p. 11 Pkt. P. 12: HO- 16-6: “You & The Impact of Future Consequences” Survey

15 II.Ways of Reinforcement: A. Primary v Secondary

16 A. 1. Primary Reinforcement Something that is naturally reinforcing Examples: food, warmth, water, etc. The item is reinforcing in and of itself

17 A. 2. Secondary Reinforcement Something that a person has learned to value or finds rewarding because it is paired with a primary reinforcer Money is a good example Cooking utensil

18

19 Shaping Preview

20 II. Ways of Reinforcement B. Shaping Step by step reinforcement of behaviors that are more and more similar to the one you want to occur. (Progress Reports, etc) Technique used to establish a new behavior

21 II. Ways of Reinforcement: C. Immediate v Delayed

22 C. Immediate/Delayed Reinforcement Immediate reinforcement is more effective than delayed reinforcement Ability to delay gratification predicts higher achievement

23 II.Ways of Reinforcement D. Schedules of Reinforcement: 1. Continuous Reinforcement

24 D. 1. Continuous reinforcement A schedule of reinforcement in which a reward follows every correct response Most useful way to establish a behavior The behavior will extinguish quickly once the reinforcement stops.

25 D. Schedules of …. 2. Reinforcement: Partial Reinforcement See Pkt. p. 13

26 D. 2. Partial Reinforcement A schedule of reinforcement in which a reward follows only some correct responses Includes the following types: –Fixed-interval and variable interval –Fixed-ratio and variable-ratio

27 (a) Fixed- Interval Schedule A partial reinforcement schedule that rewards only the first correct response after some defined period of time i.e. weekly quiz in a class

28 (a) Variable-Interval Schedule A partial reinforcement that rewards the first correct response after an unpredictable amount of time i.e. “pop” quiz in a class

29 (b) Fixed-Ratio Schedule A partial reinforcement schedule that rewards a response only after some defined number of correct responses The faster the subject responds, the more reinforcements they will receive.

30 (b) Variable-Ratio Schedule A partial reinforcement schedule that rewards an unpredictable number of correct responses This schedule is very resistant to extinction. Sometimes called the “gambler’s schedule”; similar to a slot machine

31 Schedules of Reinforcement Pkt. p. 14 for practice…then Homework: Worksheet #3 from Mrs. Schneider: “Schedules of Reinforcement”

32 III. Punishment: The Process of Punishment Decrease Decrease a behavior from happening again by following it with a negative consequence

33 II. A. Types of Punishment (1) An undesirable event following a behavior (2) A desirable state or event ends following a behavior

34 III. Punishment: B. Problems With Punishment Module 16: Operant Conditioning

35 II. B. Negative Effects of Punishment Doesn’t prevent the undesirable behavior when away from the punisher Can lead to fear, anxiety, and lower self- esteem Children who are punished physically may learn to use aggression as a means to solve problems.

36 II. C. Positive Effects of Punishment Punishment can effectively control certain behaviors. Especially useful if teaching a child not to do a dangerous behavior Most still suggest reinforcing an incompatible behavior rather than using punishment Homework: Worksheet #4 from Mrs. Schneider: “Reinforcement v Punishment”

37 IV. The Role of Cognition: New Understandings of Operant Conditioning Module 16: Operant Conditioning

38 III. A. Latent Learning Learning that takes place in absence of an apparent reward

39 III. B. Cognitive Map A mental representation of a place Experiments showed rats could learn a maze without any reinforcements

40 III. C. Overjustification Effect The effect of promising a reward for doing what someone already likes to do The reward may lessen and replace the person’s original, natural motivation, so that the behavior stops if the reward is eliminated

41 The End


Download ppt "Operant Conditioning Module 16 Demo Activity HO 16.1 Pkt. p. 7 See outline in pkt. p. 6 ½ DVD: Discovering Psychology: Disc 2: “Learning”"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google