Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Mongols, and the T’ang, S’ung, and Yuan dynasties Mongols are the glue that brings East and West together – how did that happen? Chapter 12:1, 2, 3.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Mongols, and the T’ang, S’ung, and Yuan dynasties Mongols are the glue that brings East and West together – how did that happen? Chapter 12:1, 2, 3."— Presentation transcript:

1 Mongols, and the T’ang, S’ung, and Yuan dynasties Mongols are the glue that brings East and West together – how did that happen? Chapter 12:1, 2, 3

2 Big Picture Large-scale Asian trade and contact continued between East Asia and the Mediterranean world through the first millennium CE, including over the Indian Ocean. Other kingdoms in southeast Asia and Africa were connected by this trade. Strong, highly developed Chinese dynasties followed the Han Dynasty, but fell to Mongol invasions, who created the largest empire known in human history.

3 Han Territories: 202 BCE – 220 CE

4 Silk Road Trading Routes

5 Camels and Horses

6 Taking a Break on the Silk Road

7 Post-Han Period of de-centralization in China – Three Kingdoms period ( CE) – Jin ( CE) – Southern and Northern Dynasties Sui Dynasty ( CE) T’ang Dynasty ( CE) Song Dynasty ( CE – Northern and Southern periods) Yuan Dynasty (Mongols!) ( CE) Period of intense overland connection with the West Ming Dynasty ( CE) Qing Dynasty (Manchus!) ( CE) Modern Era (20 th -21 st Centuries CE)

8 Sui Dynasty Reunited China under Sui Wendi, but (like the Qin Dynasty) abused the peasantry and overused resources and collapsed. Harsh rulers, but achievements include reuniting China – Canal to connect northern cities and southern rice-producing regions – Half the workers died on this project! – Great Wall(s) were worked on – much suffering

9 T’ang Dynasty Chang’an the capital under T’ang Taizong, Wu Zhao (the only woman emperor ever in China) Kept trade routes open, expanded canals and roads “Equal Field System” – families given land grants based on need rather than wealth Continued Confucian Civil Examinations, built schools (although only wealthy could participate) Fell due to internal rebellions, Arab defeats in the West, and heavy taxes - which fragmented China until Song reunited them Foot-Binding reading

10 Empires of Central Asia

11 Song Dynasty Capital moved to Kaifeng (closer to the coast) Had to constantly fight with the Jurched Jin Empire in the north and the Tangut Empire in the west (Tibet regions) – Usually paid tribute instead – Pushed south of the Huang He by 1126 Historical works, artwork, and great Buddhist paintings survive from this period. Defeated by the Mongols in 1279 Population was roughly 120 million people by this point

12 S’ung Paintings

13 S’ung Cosmetic Case

14 T’ang and Song Inventions Porcelain – late 700s Ce Mechanical clocks – 700s Ce Printing – block printing: 700s CE; movable type: 1040 CE Gunpowder: 800 CE Paper Money: 1020s CE Magnetic Compass: 1100s CE

15 Mongol Empire

16 Mongols Genghis Khan (born Temujin) Consolidated the Mongol nomadic tribes and systematically conquered his neighbors (the Jurched Jin, the Song Dynasty, the Tangut Empire etc). Horses, fighting, wrestling, fermented mare’s milk Established the closest thing to the first world-wide trading network that allowed free travel west and east. Mongol Empire Reading Allowed for the travels of Marco Polo etc

17

18

19

20 Yuan Dynasty Mongol Dynasty Population in 1300 was roughly 60 million people! – Dynasty ended mostly due to the Black Death (Bubonic Plague) cut that population down by at least 1/3 – closer to ½ (from 120 million). – Eventually spread to Europe in the 14 th century Pax Mongolica Connection to the West

21

22


Download ppt "Mongols, and the T’ang, S’ung, and Yuan dynasties Mongols are the glue that brings East and West together – how did that happen? Chapter 12:1, 2, 3."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google