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Citizenship in the Nation An Exploration in the Government of the United States.

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Presentation on theme: "Citizenship in the Nation An Exploration in the Government of the United States."— Presentation transcript:

1 Citizenship in the Nation An Exploration in the Government of the United States

2 What is America’s form of Government? Pledge of Allegiance (video) (video) America is a Republic, not a Democracy

3 WHY IS IT EAGLE REQUIRED? Citizenship and Community values are what scouts are all about: I will do my best to do my duty to God and my country and to help other people at all times ! Knowing the history of the nation and the meaning of good citizenship will give you an appreciation of what those good and thoughtful citizens accomplished during their lifetimes to get us to where we are. We should be very grateful. The sacrifices, ideas, & efforts are good examples for what you need to do to carry on to help improve our community, the nation, and the world. (Think of it as the ripple effect.) Sometimes your rights and freedom can be taken for granted. It is good to stop & think on occasion about this topic. When you look at this merit badge sewn on your sash, think about our nation, how you are an important part of it, and how you have the right, duty, and the privilege to help shape your government for the benefit of all.

4 Requirement #1 Explain what citizenship in the nation means and what it takes to be a good citizen of this country.

5 Who Cares? History is a guide to navigation in perilous times. History is who we are and why we are the way we are. David McCullough We are citizens in that we owe allegiance to our government and in return our government owes us protection. We know and understand our history and live up to the ideals expressed in The Declaration of Independence, Constitution and Bill of Rights

6 Discuss the rights, duties, and obligations of a responsible and active American citizen. FREEDOM OF RELIGION FREEDOM OF SPEECH FREEDOM OF THE PRESS THE RIGHT TO ASSEMBLE THE RIGHT TO PETITION THE RIGHT TO BEAR ARMS THE RIGHT TO A TRIAL OBEY LAWS PAY TAXES

7 Discuss the rights, duties, and obligations of a responsible and active American citizen. JURY DUTY SERVE AS A WITNESS REGISTER FOR THE SELECTIVE SERVICE VOTING HELP SOMEONE WHEN IN NEED GO TO WAR WHEN CALLED UPON

8 On Your Own Requirement #2 and #3

9 Requirement #2 Do TWO of the following and discuss what you saw and learned: – Visit a place that is listed as a National Historic Landmark or that is on the National Register of Historic Places. Tell what you learned about the landmark or site and what you found interesting about it.National Historic LandmarkNational Register of Historic Places – Tour your state capitol building or the U.S. Capitol. Tell what you learned about the capitol, its function, and the history. – Tour a federal facility. Explain what you saw there and what you learned about its function in the local community and how it serves this nation.federal facility – Choose a national monument that interests you. Using books, brochures, the Internet (with your parent’s permission), and other resources, find out more about the monument. Tell what you learned, and explain why the monument is important to this country’s citizens.national monument

10 Requirement #3 Watch the national evening news five days in a row OR read the front page of a major daily newspaper five days in a row. Discuss the national issues you learned about with your counselor. Choose one of the issues and explain how it affects you and your family. – USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Washington Post, Daily New, The New York Post, Chicago Tribune, Newsday, Houston Chronicle

11 Requirement #4 Discuss each of the following documents with your counselor.

12 Declaration of Independence Five main parts – Preamble explains why it was written – A series of “self-evident” truths about the rights of all men and the principles of government – A list of 27 specific complaints against Kings George II – Summary of the efforts the colonists made to avoid a break with England – Declaration that the 13 colonies are “free and independent” states National Treasure

13 Preamble to the Constitution We the people of the United States, in order to form a more perfect union, establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

14 The Constitution Outlines the 6 principals of our nation: Popular sovereignty – The people have supreme power Limited government – It can only do what the people have empowered it to do Separation of powers – Responsibilities of the government is divided among three branches Checks and balances - Each branch has authority and responsibility to check (restrain) the power of the other two Judicial review – The federal courts have the power to review the acts of the other two Federalism - power is shared between national and local governments

15 Bill of Rights First 10 amendments (additions) sponsored by James Madison Guarantees individual rights and freedoms

16 Bill of Rights

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19 Class Two 4d.

20 4e. Additional Amendments to the Constitution Amendment XI - Suit Against States (1795) Amendment XII - Election of President and Vice-President (1804) Amendment XIII - Abolition of Slavery (1865) Amendment XIV - Privileges and Immunities, Due Process, Equal Protection, Apportionment of Representatives, Civil War Disqualification and Debt (1868) Amendment XV - Rights Not to Be Denied on Account of Race (1870) Amendment XVI - Income Tax (1913) Amendment XVII - Election of Senators (1913) Amendment XVIII - Prohibition (1919) Amendment XIX - Women's Right to Vote (1920) Amendment XX - Presidential Term and Succession (1933) Amendment XXI - Repeal of Prohibition (1933) Amendment XXII - Two Term Limit on President (1951) Amendment XXIII - Presidential Vote in D.C. (1961) Amendment XXIV - Poll Tax (1964) Amendment XXV - Presidential Succession (1967) Amendment XXVI - Right to Vote at Age 18 (1971) Amendment XXVII - Compensation of Members of Congress (1992) Cornell University Law School

21 Requirement #5 List the six functions of government as noted in the preamble to the Constitution. Discuss with your counselor how these functions affect your family and local community.

22 Preamble to the Constitution A preamble states the purpose and objectives of a document. The preamble was written in the belief that most people would not read the Constitution – People would at least know the intent of the document. The rest of the Constitution explains how these objectives are to be met by various departments and layers of government.

23 Preamble to the Constitution cont. The six goals and objectives of the federal government: 1. “form a more perfect Union" –Strengthen the country by unifying the states 2. “establish Justice“ – Enact and apply laws that treat all citizens reasonably, fairly, and impartially. 3. "insure domestic Tranquility" - in other words, to ‘keep the peace’. 4. "provide for the common defense" – make sure the country is prepared to defend itself from its enemies 5. "promote the general Welfare" – provide services and make efforts to improve the quality life for all citizens 6. "secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity“ – Ensure our children have the same rights and liberties as we do

24 Your Turn!!! Tell how you feel life in the United States might be different without The Declaration of Independence, Preamble or the Constitution. Then choose one document and explain how it impacts you and your family. Declaration of Independence – “Free and independent states” Preamble to the Constitution – “establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general welfare, and secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our posterity” The Constitution – Popular sovereignty, Limited government, Separation of powers, Checks and balances, Judicial review, Federalism

25 Requirement #7

26 Three Branches of our Federal Government Legislative Branch (Bill) (Bill) – Article I of the Constitution specifies that there shall be two separate legislative bodies: Senate House of Representatives – Together they are called the Congress and Make laws – There are 100 senators (2 per state) – 435 representatives determined by each state’s population States with larger populations have more representation – California has 53 representatives and Utah has only 4 representatives Each member represents an area of the state, known as a congressional district.

27 Legislative Branch Citizen Involvement – Vote on who takes office – Suggest laws and bills – Write letters of concern Importance of Checks and Balances – Keeps our federal government in balance. No one person or group can have too much control – Change happens slowly and deliberately

28 Three Branches of our Federal Government Executive Branch – The executive branch includes the president of the United States, the vice president, and the major departments of the government such as the Labor Department, Department of Defense, State Department, Treasury Department, Department of Justice, Department of Education etc. Each department has a leader, appointed by the president. Together, all the leaders, along with the president, vice president, and a few other people, make up the cabinet. The job of the executive branch is to enforce the laws.

29 Executive Branch Citizen Involvement – Vote on who takes office Importance of Checks and Balances – Keeps our federal government in balance. – Change happens slowly and deliberately

30 Three Branches of our Federal Government Judicial branch – The role of the judicial branch is to interpret the laws. It consists of two separate levels of courts: state courts and federal courts. The type of court that a case is tried in depends on the law that was allegedly violated. Most of the laws that govern our day-to-day living are state laws. Violations of federal law include offenses involving federal government employees, crimes committed across state lines (for example, kidnapping or evading arrest), and fraud involving the national government (such as income tax or postal fraud).

31 Judicial Branch Citizen Involvement – Commit a crime in a form of civil disobedience to test an unjust law – Run for office as a judge or district attorney – Jury duty Importance of Checks and Balances – Keeps our federal government in balance. – Change happens slowly and deliberately Rosa Parks

32 BrainPop

33 Requirement #8

34 Our Congressional Representatives Write a letter about a national issue and send it to one of these elected officials, sharing your view with him or her. – #2 Watch the national evening news five days in a row OR read the front page of a major daily newspaper five days in a row. Utah Senators: Orrin Hatch and Mike Lee Congress from our district: Rob Bishop Congress Orrin Hatch Mike Lee Rob Bishop

35 Requirement #6

36 Speech of National Historical Importance Choose a speech of national historical importance. Find out about the author, and tell your counselor about the person who gave the speech. Explain the importance of the speech at the time it was given, and tell how it applies to American citizens today. Choose a sentence or two from the speech that has significant meaning to you, and tell why.

37 Franklin D. Roosevelt March 4, Inaugural addressaddress Great depression “Only thing to fear is fear itself” How our country responds to crisis

38 John F. Kennedy January 20, Inaugural addressaddress Human rights and helping our country move forward "Ask Not What Your Country Can Do For You“

39 Neil Armstrong July 16, 1969 – Apollo 1111 Race to put a man on the moon “One small step for man”

40 Martin Luther King Jr. August 28, Lincoln Memorial, Washington D.C.D.C. Human rights and freedoms “I have a dream”

41 George W. Bush September 11, 2001 – Terrorist attacksattacks “Our country is strong. A great people has been moved to defend a great nation”


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