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7 principles of the Constitution (Pg 37). The Preamble Introduction to the US Constitution – 1 sentence States where power comes from Lists the 6 goals.

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Presentation on theme: "7 principles of the Constitution (Pg 37). The Preamble Introduction to the US Constitution – 1 sentence States where power comes from Lists the 6 goals."— Presentation transcript:

1 7 principles of the Constitution (Pg 37)

2 The Preamble Introduction to the US Constitution – 1 sentence States where power comes from Lists the 6 goals of US government We the People of the United States, in order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.

3 “ We the People of the United States” The power of the US government is in the hands of the people “Form a more perfect union” Act as one country “Establish justice” The law must be reasonable, fair, and impartial “Insure domestic tranquility” Keep peace within the country; maintain order at home

4 Preamble “Provide for the common defense” Protect US interests in the world “Promote the general welfare” Provide people with basic services “Secure the blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our posterity” Guarantee our freedoms today and for future generations

5 Section 4-4 Power to the people The Framers had a common vision for the government: It should be representative of the people and limited in scope.  Power should be divided among different levels.  To achieve these ends, the Framers embraced five principles as the backbone of the Constitution: popular sovereignty, rule of law, separation of powers, checks and balances, independent judiciary, individual rights and federalism. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 89–90)

6 Section 4-5 Popular Sovereignty Article IV guarantees a republic, in which supreme power belongs to the people (popular sovereignty).  The people express their will through elected representatives.  Provisions, such as those about the right to vote, ensure popular sovereignty. Amendments have expanded this power 15 th Amendment- 1870(African-Americans) 17 th Amendment-1913 (public elects Senators) 19 th Amendment- 1920( Women) 26 th Amendment- 1971 (lowers the age to 18) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 89–90)

7 Section 4-6 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What does “popular sovereignty” mean? Popular sovereignty is the notion that power lies with the people. Taken apart, “sovereignty” means the right to rule and “popular,” in this case, means the population or public. Popular Sovereignty (cont.) (pages 89–90)

8 Section 4-7 Rule of Law The Framers believed the government should be strong but not too strong.  The Constitution sets limits by stating what government may and may not do.  Government is also limited by the rule of law.  This means that the law applies to everyone, even those who govern. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (page 90)

9 Section 4-8 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. How does the rule of law limit government? The rule of law means that no one is above the law, even government leaders. No one may break the law or escape its reach and provides for ways to remove politicians who break the law. Rule of Law (cont.) (page 90)

10 Section 4-9 Separation of Powers To keep any one person or group from becoming too powerful, the Framers divided government into three branches with different functions.  This split of authority among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches is called the separation of powers. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (page 91)

11 Separation of Powers Constituency Legislative House of Reps –directly to the people Senate –Directly to the people after the 17 th amendment Judicial Chosen by the President Approved by the Senate Executive Electoral College

12 Separation of Powers Legislative Law Makers Congress –House of Reps –Senate Judicial Law- interpreters Supreme Court –Federal Courts –State Courts Executive Law- Enforcers Presidents –V.P. –Cabinet

13 Separation of Powers Term Length Legislative House of Reps –2 yrs Senate –6 yrs Judicial Life –Ability to impeach if necessary Executive President –4 yrs –2 term limit 22 nd Amendment

14 Section 4-11 Checks and Balances Checks and balances keep any one branch from becoming too powerful.  Each branch can check, or restrain, the power of the others.  For example, the president can veto laws, Congress can block presidential appointments, and the Supreme Court can overturn laws it finds contrary to the Constitution. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (page 91–92)

15 Section 4-12 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What are some ways that Congress can check the powers of the other branches? Congress can block presidential appointments and treaties, control spending by the executive branch, and, in cases of serious wrongdoing, remove the president from office. Congress can also reject judicial appointments and remove unfit judges. Checks and Balances (cont.) (page 91–92)

16 Section 4-13 Federalism Under federalism, power is shared by the national government and the states.  Americans must obey the laws of both.  Enumerated or expressed powers are powers the Constitution specifically grants to the national government.  Powers not given to the national government are reserved powers kept by the states.  Powers that both levels of government can exercise are concurrent powers. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (pages 92–93)

17 Section 4-14 Federalism (cont.) When national and state laws conflict, the Constitution is the final authority.  Neither the national nor state governments may act in violation of it.  It provides the government sufficient power to keep order, protect, and defend, yet sets limits to avoid tyranny. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

18 Section 4-15 Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answer. What are some examples of concurrent powers? Concurrent powers include the power to enforce the laws, establish courts, collect taxes, borrow money, and provide for the general welfare. Federalism (cont.)

19 Section 4-11 Independent Judiciary Independent Judiciary keeps the politics out of the court system.  The judicial branch is established as an independent entity.  The Supreme court is the hightestauthority in the federal court system Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (page 91–92)

20 Section 4-11 Individual Rights Rights and Liberties are protected multiple times from government involvement  Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information. (page 91–92) The amendments are a continuing expansion of this principal

21 Section 4-16 Checking for Understanding __ 1.the split of authority among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches __ 2.a system in which each branch of government is able to check, or restrain, the power of the others __ 3.the notion that power lies with the people __ 4.principle that the law applies to everyone, even those who govern A.separation of powers B.popular sovereignty C.rule of law D.checks and balances Define Match the terms on the right with their definitions on the left. D B A C Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the answers.


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