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Made To Be Used 2008. Utensils for eating have always been flat or bowl- shaped starting with leaves and the cupped hand. Leaves were disposable, easily.

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Presentation on theme: "Made To Be Used 2008. Utensils for eating have always been flat or bowl- shaped starting with leaves and the cupped hand. Leaves were disposable, easily."— Presentation transcript:

1 Made To Be Used 2008

2 Utensils for eating have always been flat or bowl- shaped starting with leaves and the cupped hand. Leaves were disposable, easily accessible, and biodegradable!!

3 When pottery was developed, the natural forms were emulated and remain the basic forms to this day. The leaf was replaced with a plate

4 Cupped hands were replaced with a bowl

5 Pots of Purpose

6 Eating

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8 Drinking

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10 Shape of cup probably came from cupped hand, shells, or horns of animals.

11 Storage

12 Jars to store water, seeds, wine, oil, any harvested food, etc. seeds wine oil water

13 Carrying

14 3 basic types Balance on the head Slung by a rope or cloth Hand held

15 Cooking and Food Preparation

16 Big variety due to wide range of foods prepared.

17 Serving

18 Through the years, as cooking became more sophisticated, greater attention was shown to presentation and serving vessels

19 Lighting

20 The discovery that animal fats and oils could be burned led to ceramic lamps

21 Funereal Use

22 From ancient times, pottery was used as ceramic coffins, canopic jars, ossuary or ash jar

23 Process-Still the same today Pinch Pots Coil Pots Slab Pots Press-Molding Extrusion Slip casting Thrown Pots

24 Considerations…still the same after all these years…… What will it be used for? Size and weight suitable for intended use? If used in the hand, how does its form relate to the shape of the hand? Is it easy to lift, pour, or serve from? Can it be easily cleaned? Form

25 Consideration….Foot or base 1. Is it wide enough for stability? 2. Does it stand evenly? 3. Is the base rough and likely to scratch surfaces?

26 Consideration…..rim 1. What type of rim best suits the needs of function? Is it to carry a lid? 2. Will it be drunk from? If so, how does it fit the shape of the mouth? 3. Is it thick enough to withstand wear and tear of use? 4. How wide does it need to be for easy cleaning? 5. Does it complete and compliment form? 6. If it is for storage, is it wide enough to easily get hands, spoons, and scoops in and out?

27 Consideration….lid 1. What kind of lid is most suitable for the function? 2. What type of lid best suits the form? 3. Is it to have a knob or other form of handle? 4. Is it made in such a way that it won’t fall off or out? 5. Does it fit? 6. Is the edge of the lid substantial enough to take everyday use?

28 Consideration….spout or pouring lip 1. Does it need a spout or a pouring lip? 2. Does it pour without dripping? 3. Does it complement the form? 4. Is it placed so that the pouring end is higher than the highest point of liquid likely to be used inside the container? 5. Is it wide enough to allow the liquid through easily.

29 Consideration…Handles & knobs 1. Does the object need a handle or a knob? Does it complement the form? 2. How do they feel in the hand? Comfortable, secure? 3. Are they substantial enough to take the weight of the pot plus its contents? 4. Are they for decorative effect only? 5. If they are on cooking pots, are they able to be picked up when wearing oven mitts? 6. How many fingers need to be accommodated? 7. Are they too large or too small? 8. What is the thickness and width of the handle? 9. Are the edges excessively sharp?

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32 Robin Hopper Ceramic Artist with Functional Focus

33 Robin Hopper -Functional potter and artist An internationally known potter, teacher and author. Taught throughout Canada, the U.S.A., and in England, Australia, New Zealand, China, Korea, and Japan. Ceramic work is in public, corporate and private collections throughout the world.

34 Robin Hopper’s Showroom

35 Robin’s work in ceramics spans over a 46 year period. a great deal of ceramic historical and technical research an ongoing studio involvement with both functional production one-of-a-kind art works, primarily in porcelain.

36 Born in England in 1939 Attended Croydon College of Art ( ). Developed studios in both England and Canada, where he immigrated in After two years teaching in Toronto at Central Technical School, he set up and headed the Ceramics and Glass Department at Georgian College, Barrie, Ontario. Resigned in 1972 from teaching to devote full energies to his work in ceramics and relocated to Victoria, B.C., Canada in 1977.

37 author of: 1. 'The Ceramic Spectrum', 2. 'Functional Pottery', 3. 'Clay and Glazes for the Potter', 4. 'Making Marks' (March 2003) 5. 'Ceramics‘-A Lifetime of Works written many articles in major international ceramics the Founder and Director of the Metchosin International Summer School of the Arts.

38 The domestic ware is made of porcelain and includes mugs, jugs, bowls, goblets, cream and sugars, veggie bowls, teapots, butter dishes, pitchers, casseroles, serving bowls, lasagna and salmon dishes.

39 He does not change the style or the glazes of his work. It is made using a variation of five different background glazes, with surface decoration combining brushwork, layered, painted and trailed glazes.

40 Some background glazes are Tenmoku, a beautiful oriental black/brown glaze overlaid with a golden crystalline rutile glaze, iron brushwork and a white trailing glaze;

41 Satin White with beige/chestnut brown brushwork; Satin White with blue brushwork; Other glazes Shino Lidded Jar Wheel thrown porcelain with brush work. Fired in a propane gas kiln. 22.5cm H x 19cm W

42 Blue/Purple with green and turquoise Classical Series Basket Wheel thrown and altered porcelain. Oxidation fired in an electric kiln. 25.5cm L x 16cm H x 16cm D

43 Clematis Series Large Plate Wheel thrown, high fired reduction porcelain with multiple glaze applications and brush work. Matt Honey Gold with iron brush work. The glazes can vary depending on the firing. The work is fired in a reducing atmosphere to cone 10 using a propane gas kiln.

44 Clematis Series Large Jar Wheel thrown, high fired reduction porcelain with multiple glaze applications and brush work. 51cm H x 22cm W

45 Southwest Series Vase Wheel thrown porcelain with Terra Sigillata, black pigment and chrome red overglaze. Fired in oxidation. 19cm W x 19cm H

46 Lidded Jar-Facetted Three-Colored Agate Ware

47 Colored Clay Series Bowl Wheel thrown and fluted colored porcelain. High fired in oxidation. 18cm W x 8cm H


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