Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

The Nation Expands 1800-1900 By: Julie B., Marika W., Jack L., Jen Z., Michael H., Joey C., Shawn D.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "The Nation Expands 1800-1900 By: Julie B., Marika W., Jack L., Jen Z., Michael H., Joey C., Shawn D."— Presentation transcript:

1 The Nation Expands By: Julie B., Marika W., Jack L., Jen Z., Michael H., Joey C., Shawn D.

2 Rupert’s Land- Canada’s Interest In It  Hudson bay Co. Formed trading furs only in Rupert ’ s Land.  1800 Eastern Canada (Ontario)- develop land- Canada believed land had economic value.  1857 expanded Rupert ’ s land.  1869 Canada bought land- 10x amount =  Canada in return got one tenth of Hudson Bay Co.  Hudson bay Co. Formed trading furs only in Rupert ’ s Land.  1800 Eastern Canada (Ontario)- develop land- Canada believed land had economic value.  1857 expanded Rupert ’ s land.  1869 Canada bought land- 10x amount =  Canada in return got one tenth of Hudson Bay Co.

3 The Rupert’s Land Act  Paid $1,500,000 to Hudson’s Bay Co. for land  After the Canadian government gained control, they called it the North-West Territory  The Rupert’s Land Act allowed the British government to transfer Hudson’s Bay Co. lands to the Canadian government  In 1869, the transfer took place, and the government did not plan to make it any part of it a province  The act was passed in 1868, and Canada wanted to buy Rupert's Land  The Hudson’s Bay Co. kept its fur fort and was given some large land grants in the west  Rupert’s Land (North-West Territory) covered more than half of Canada  Paid $1,500,000 to Hudson’s Bay Co. for land  After the Canadian government gained control, they called it the North-West Territory  The Rupert’s Land Act allowed the British government to transfer Hudson’s Bay Co. lands to the Canadian government  In 1869, the transfer took place, and the government did not plan to make it any part of it a province  The act was passed in 1868, and Canada wanted to buy Rupert's Land  The Hudson’s Bay Co. kept its fur fort and was given some large land grants in the west  Rupert’s Land (North-West Territory) covered more than half of Canada

4 The Red River Resistance & Louis Riel  The Red River Resistance began at the Red River settlement; surveyors trespassed on the farms and lands of the M é tis in the Red River Resistance.  The M é tis were extremely angered by the surveyors and the person who sent them, Sir William McDougal the lieutenant governor of the Northwest Territories.  A National Committee of M é tis was set up by Louis Riel to resist the surveyors, the National Committee also bargained with the Canadian Government for the lands and M é tis rights.  The M é tis believed that William McDougal had no right to enter the settlement until the transfer of Rupert ’ s Land officially took place. The M é tis had informed William McDougal that he could not enter the settlement without the permission of the inhabitants.  The M é tis soon made a List of Rights for themselves, which were the conditions by which they would join Canada.  The Red River Resistance began at the Red River settlement; surveyors trespassed on the farms and lands of the M é tis in the Red River Resistance.  The M é tis were extremely angered by the surveyors and the person who sent them, Sir William McDougal the lieutenant governor of the Northwest Territories.  A National Committee of M é tis was set up by Louis Riel to resist the surveyors, the National Committee also bargained with the Canadian Government for the lands and M é tis rights.  The M é tis believed that William McDougal had no right to enter the settlement until the transfer of Rupert ’ s Land officially took place. The M é tis had informed William McDougal that he could not enter the settlement without the permission of the inhabitants.  The M é tis soon made a List of Rights for themselves, which were the conditions by which they would join Canada.

5 M é tis List Of Rights  To elect own legislative- Assembly pass all local laws  To elect local sheriffs and constables  Those treaties signed between federal government- Native people around  Both English-French be used in provincial legislature and courts all provincial documents and acts  All existing customs, rights and privileges remain after joining Canada  To elect own legislative- Assembly pass all local laws  To elect local sheriffs and constables  Those treaties signed between federal government- Native people around  Both English-French be used in provincial legislature and courts all provincial documents and acts  All existing customs, rights and privileges remain after joining Canada

6 The Manitoba Act  The area around the Red River settlement were to join Canada as a province  On July 15th, 1870, Manitoba became a province  The rest of Rupert’s land stayed a Territory  Many points from the Métis list of rights became part of the Manitoba Act  English and French were to be its official languages  There were 2 government funded school systems; The Roman Catholic, and the Protestant  The federal government retained control of the Crown Islands  The area around the Red River settlement were to join Canada as a province  On July 15th, 1870, Manitoba became a province  The rest of Rupert’s land stayed a Territory  Many points from the Métis list of rights became part of the Manitoba Act  English and French were to be its official languages  There were 2 government funded school systems; The Roman Catholic, and the Protestant  The federal government retained control of the Crown Islands

7 New Caledonia  After the British claimed the Pacific coast, large companies were actively searching for furs in the area  Vancouver Island became a British colony in 1849  There were fewer than 1000 settlers living on the island at that time  The mainland, called New Caledonia had only a few forts  A gold rush in 1858 brought over miners to New Caledonia, many were from the United States  In 1858 New Caledonia became another British colony and was renamed British Columbia  In 1866 Britain united the two colonies with the name British Columbia  By 1868 the colony was in debt  British Columbia was in debt so they joined Canada and preserved British ties  The joining of British Columbia to Canada is important to Canada ’ s nationhood because the colony brought natural resources, industry, etc. and helped make Canada what it is today  After the British claimed the Pacific coast, large companies were actively searching for furs in the area  Vancouver Island became a British colony in 1849  There were fewer than 1000 settlers living on the island at that time  The mainland, called New Caledonia had only a few forts  A gold rush in 1858 brought over miners to New Caledonia, many were from the United States  In 1858 New Caledonia became another British colony and was renamed British Columbia  In 1866 Britain united the two colonies with the name British Columbia  By 1868 the colony was in debt  British Columbia was in debt so they joined Canada and preserved British ties  The joining of British Columbia to Canada is important to Canada ’ s nationhood because the colony brought natural resources, industry, etc. and helped make Canada what it is today New Caledonia (Now British Columbia)

8 Newfoundland and the Anti- Confederation Song  NFL not invited to Charlottetown conference in 1864 because no one thought NFL would support it  2 important groups from population: business community and the Roman Catholics were strongly anti-Confederation  Business group strongly anti-Confederation because they did not trade often with Canadians and were against political changes that might increase taxes or restrict freedom to choose their own trading partners  1874: Conservatives returned to power and would not force Confederation on N.F.L.  Government started program of railway building  Many business community members against railway because they thought it would lead to bankruptcy  1894: colony facing bank because prices for fish and seal oil dropped  Delegation sent to Ottawa to negotiate terms so that NFL could join Confederation  Terms did not work out and NFL did not join Confederation until 1949  Created Anti-Confederation Song  NFL not invited to Charlottetown conference in 1864 because no one thought NFL would support it  2 important groups from population: business community and the Roman Catholics were strongly anti-Confederation  Business group strongly anti-Confederation because they did not trade often with Canadians and were against political changes that might increase taxes or restrict freedom to choose their own trading partners  1874: Conservatives returned to power and would not force Confederation on N.F.L.  Government started program of railway building  Many business community members against railway because they thought it would lead to bankruptcy  1894: colony facing bank because prices for fish and seal oil dropped  Delegation sent to Ottawa to negotiate terms so that NFL could join Confederation  Terms did not work out and NFL did not join Confederation until 1949  Created Anti-Confederation Song

9 Prince Edward Island Act  July 1, 1873: PEI joined Canadian Confederation  Because PEI joined the Confederation, Canadian Government gave PEI $ to buy back land from absentee lords  government paid all railway debts  provided a $50 grant for every person living on the island  ferry and telegraph services provided between PE.I. and mainland  July 1, 1873: PEI joined Canadian Confederation  Because PEI joined the Confederation, Canadian Government gave PEI $ to buy back land from absentee lords  government paid all railway debts  provided a $50 grant for every person living on the island  ferry and telegraph services provided between PE.I. and mainland

10 The Pacific Scandal  The Pacific Scandal was an event based on the Canadian Pacific Railway; the scandal was mainly centered on the contract to build the railway.  The Liberal Party of Canada accused the Conservative Party of accepting bribes from Hugh Allan; this accusation became a massive factor in the election of  The Conservative Party of Canada and its leader; John A. MacDonald received bribes from Hugh Allan in exchange for the contract to build the Canadian Pacific Railway.  The Conservatives claimed that they received “ donations ” from Hugh Allan for the 1872 election. The total amount of “ donations ” received by the Conservative Party was estimated to be around $350,000.  Evidence of the scandal was found six days before the 1872 election; John A. MacDonald resigned as Canada ’ s Prime Minister as a result of the scandal.  The Pacific Scandal was an event based on the Canadian Pacific Railway; the scandal was mainly centered on the contract to build the railway.  The Liberal Party of Canada accused the Conservative Party of accepting bribes from Hugh Allan; this accusation became a massive factor in the election of  The Conservative Party of Canada and its leader; John A. MacDonald received bribes from Hugh Allan in exchange for the contract to build the Canadian Pacific Railway.  The Conservatives claimed that they received “ donations ” from Hugh Allan for the 1872 election. The total amount of “ donations ” received by the Conservative Party was estimated to be around $350,000.  Evidence of the scandal was found six days before the 1872 election; John A. MacDonald resigned as Canada ’ s Prime Minister as a result of the scandal.

11 Alexander Mackenzie  Mackenzie was born in perthshire, Scotland, 1822  He was the Second Prime Minister of Canada, and the first Liberal Prime Minister  In 1873, Mackenzie became the leader of the liberal party and Prime Minister  During the 1870s, the country began having issues, and Mackenzie’s Government was blamed  Mackenzie lost the 1878 election to returning Prime Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald  Mackenzie remained in parliament until the year he died, in 1882  Mackenzie was born in perthshire, Scotland, 1822  He was the Second Prime Minister of Canada, and the first Liberal Prime Minister  In 1873, Mackenzie became the leader of the liberal party and Prime Minister  During the 1870s, the country began having issues, and Mackenzie’s Government was blamed  Mackenzie lost the 1878 election to returning Prime Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald  Mackenzie remained in parliament until the year he died, in 1882

12 Sir John A. Macdonald Returns: National Policy  Alexander Mackenzie prime minister, liberals in control since 1873, but were experiencing economic problems.  The Conservative party, under control of Sir John A. Macdonald, introduced a National Policy.  National Policy had three parts: protective tariffs, National Railway and Settlement in the west.  The Protective Tariffs were designed so that goods from other countries were more expensive than Canadian goods, so that Canadian industries would sell more of their own manufactured goods.  SUCCESS  The National Railway would take settlers to the West, and their crops to the East.  SUCCESS  Macdonald planned to help immigrants from other countries settle in the west.  FAILURE  Canadian voters responded positively to these ideas, and voted Macdonald back into power, along with the conservative party.  Alexander Mackenzie prime minister, liberals in control since 1873, but were experiencing economic problems.  The Conservative party, under control of Sir John A. Macdonald, introduced a National Policy.  National Policy had three parts: protective tariffs, National Railway and Settlement in the west.  The Protective Tariffs were designed so that goods from other countries were more expensive than Canadian goods, so that Canadian industries would sell more of their own manufactured goods.  SUCCESS  The National Railway would take settlers to the West, and their crops to the East.  SUCCESS  Macdonald planned to help immigrants from other countries settle in the west.  FAILURE  Canadian voters responded positively to these ideas, and voted Macdonald back into power, along with the conservative party.

13 The Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR)  During the years from , the CPR was built  Stretching from Vancouver to Montreal, with headquarters in Calgary, Alberta, The CPR also served major cities in the United States  It was Canada’s first transcontinental railway, which is now a freight railway  The CPR is a national symbol of Canadian nationalism  During the years from , the CPR was built  Stretching from Vancouver to Montreal, with headquarters in Calgary, Alberta, The CPR also served major cities in the United States  It was Canada’s first transcontinental railway, which is now a freight railway  The CPR is a national symbol of Canadian nationalism

14 Need For The North West Mounted Police  August 1873, parliament created special police for the west called North West Mounted Police (NWMP)  The Canadian Government was concerned that American settlers would try to make the North West part of the United States  An incident in Cypress Hills showed the great need for a police force, when a group of American traders shot and killed 30 Assiniboine people.  In 1873, 300 men were sent to the west to patrol  Respected highly by Canadians and Americans by the 1880s  The NWMP gave friendly advice to new settlers, carried mail, fought fires and prevented open conflict among Native peoples, between Natives & non-Natives, and amongst settlers  August 1873, parliament created special police for the west called North West Mounted Police (NWMP)  The Canadian Government was concerned that American settlers would try to make the North West part of the United States  An incident in Cypress Hills showed the great need for a police force, when a group of American traders shot and killed 30 Assiniboine people.  In 1873, 300 men were sent to the west to patrol  Respected highly by Canadians and Americans by the 1880s  The NWMP gave friendly advice to new settlers, carried mail, fought fires and prevented open conflict among Native peoples, between Natives & non-Natives, and amongst settlers

15 The Seven Treaties  People wanted to move the natives so Europeans could settle  John A. Macdonald believed that the First People should be assimilated into the Canadian culture  In order to settle, the government had to isolate natives to reserves  The “ numbered treaties ” were made by the government to resolve the land claims of the First People  Seven treaties were signed form 1871 to 1877 between the government and the natives living between Lake Superior and the Rocky Mountains  Between 1889 and 1921 four more treaties were signed  People wanted to move the natives so Europeans could settle  John A. Macdonald believed that the First People should be assimilated into the Canadian culture  In order to settle, the government had to isolate natives to reserves  The “ numbered treaties ” were made by the government to resolve the land claims of the First People  Seven treaties were signed form 1871 to 1877 between the government and the natives living between Lake Superior and the Rocky Mountains  Between 1889 and 1921 four more treaties were signed


Download ppt "The Nation Expands 1800-1900 By: Julie B., Marika W., Jack L., Jen Z., Michael H., Joey C., Shawn D."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google