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Seeking Sovereignty Louis Riel and The Red River Metis (1869–1885) Since 1670, the Hudson’s Bay Company (a British company) owned Rupert’s Land – the vast.

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Presentation on theme: "Seeking Sovereignty Louis Riel and The Red River Metis (1869–1885) Since 1670, the Hudson’s Bay Company (a British company) owned Rupert’s Land – the vast."— Presentation transcript:

1 Seeking Sovereignty Louis Riel and The Red River Metis (1869–1885) Since 1670, the Hudson’s Bay Company (a British company) owned Rupert’s Land – the vast northern territory

2 Seeking Sovereignty Louis Riel and The Red River Metis (1869–1885) Since 1670, the Hudson’s Bay Company (a British company) owned Rupert’s Land – the vast northern territory

3 Seeking Sovereignty Annexing the Northwest It was mostly occupied by Aboriginal peoples and fur traders, but there was also a settlement of Metis living near present- day Winnipeg, at a place called Red River.

4 Seeking Sovereignty Annexing the Northwest After Confederation, the Red River Metis were still British subjects, but they wanted to become part of the Dominion of Canada. Canada negotiated with the Hudson’s Bay Company, and bought Rupert’s Land (including Red River), renaming the entire region the North-West Territories. Neither the Canadians nor the British, however, had bothered consulting the Metis at any time.

5 Seeking Sovereignty The Red River Rebellion The Canadian government started making plans to survey the land so that white settlers could move in. The Metis didn’t want this, so they organized themselves named a leader from among them (Louis Riel) and formed a provisional (temporary) government for themselves.

6 Seeking Sovereignty The Red River Rebellion Led by Riel, the Metis demanded several things from the federal government, including: -the right to enter Confederation as a province -the right to be represented in Parliament -the right to have both English and French as official languages in their schools and courts -the right to control their own local affairs -the right to maintain their traditional way of life

7 Seeking Sovereignty The Red River Rebellion English-Canadians didn’t like the Metis’ provisional government, so in the winter of , a group of them tried to take control of it. One of the them (Thomas Scott) was captured by the Riel and the Metis, found guilty of conspiracy, and executed

8 Seeking Sovereignty The Red River Rebellion Prime Minister Macdonald was scared of the instability in the region, and was worried that it would leave Canada vulnerable to the United States. He negotiated with the Metis and allowed the Red River colony to become part of Canada – as the province of Manitoba – in He also promised that: They would have an elected assembly English and French would be recognized as official languages The Metis would receive title (official claim) to their lands The Metis would receive additional lands.

9 Seeking Sovereignty The Red River Rebellion English-Canadians wanted revenge for the execution of Thomas Scott, however, so they demanded that Macdonald do something about it Macdonald sent 1200 troops to Red River to take control of the new province The members of the provisional government went into hiding, and Riel fled to the United States

10 Seeking Sovereignty The North-West Rebellion About 14 years later (in 1884), Riel’s buddies – who are now seeing more and more English- speaking white settlers move into their territory – convince him to come back and be their leader again

11 Seeking Sovereignty The North-West Rebellion Riel then launches a series of attacks on the North-West Mounted Police, resulting in 40 deaths. Macdonald sends in more troops, and after a 6 week standoff at Batoche (in present-day Saskatchewan), the Metis finally surrender.

12 Seeking Sovereignty The North-West Rebellion Riel is tried for treason in front of an all-white jury.

13 Seeking Sovereignty The North-West Rebellion He is found guilty – and hanged.


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