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Created and Presented by: Chelsea Jean. Tis’ The Season  Winter time = Winter play  Snow Machining  Ice fishing  Snow shoeing  Skiing  You never.

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Presentation on theme: "Created and Presented by: Chelsea Jean. Tis’ The Season  Winter time = Winter play  Snow Machining  Ice fishing  Snow shoeing  Skiing  You never."— Presentation transcript:

1 Created and Presented by: Chelsea Jean

2 Tis’ The Season  Winter time = Winter play  Snow Machining  Ice fishing  Snow shoeing  Skiing  You never know when you will have to encounter and cross large bodies of ice

3 When is ice safe?  There is no concrete answer.  You can’t just look at the ice and determine if it is safe. Multiple factors are involved to determine if the ice is going to support you.(age, thickness, temperature)- plus the depth of water under the ice, size of the water body, currents, the distribution of the load on the ice.

4 Guidelines 5-6” of clear ice is recommended for foot traffic. 12”of clear ice is recommended for vehicles.

5 Watch out for overflow Overflow is layers of slush, water, and ice They are sometimes hidden under snow, and may suddenly give way. Extra pairs of dry socks and boots come in handy if overflow is encountered.

6 Did you know?  Ice is strongest where it’s clear, and weakest where it’s cloudy or full of large bubbles.  Snow cover insulates ice, making it thinner.  On smaller or mid-sized lakes, ice is usually consistently thick.

7 Driving on Ice When driving on the ice, keep it slow, under 10 mph. Ice waves can be created when you drive to fast and can cause ice to break ahead. If you’re with a group of vehicles on the ice, keep a good distance between vehicles to spread out the weight.

8 Driving on Ice  Keep vehicle windows open. You may want to have flotation available, such as a seat cushions.  It is not recommended to wear life jackets inside vehicles that are traveling on the ice.

9 Did you know?  Fresh water ice can support heavier loads than sea ice.  Sudden drop in air and ice temperatures will cause an ice sheet to contract creating cracks  Wind can affect the position of ice sheets

10 What to do if you fall through the ice  Stay calm. Do not attempt to swim, swimming will cause your body to lose heat much faster than if you stay as still as possible.  Use a whistle to attract help.  Act slowly and deliberately to conserve heat and move slowly back to where you entered the water. Expect a decrease in your strength and ability to move.  Make the moves to attempt to get out at the beginning, while you can.  If you are wearing a snowmobile helmet and your face is in the water, remove the helmet as quickly as possible, because it can fill with water and cause you to drown. Hold onto it to stay afloat.  Once on the ice, try to push yourself forward on your stomach or roll on your side to keep the weight distributed over a greater surface area. Do not stand up until you have moved onto the ground or an area of solid ice.  Remember, you take a risk anytime you go out onto the ice.

11 Carry hand-held ice spikes. They are like large nails, on a line that can be threaded through a jacket.

12 Be Prepared  Proper winter gear  Ice cleats  Ice picks  Shovels  Water proof backpack with spare wool socks and emergency kit.  Have a plan – Where you are going who you are with and when you will be back.  Buddy system, never go out alone!

13 Keep your pets leashed  Your pets can wonder off on ice and fall though weak spots.  Never dive in to rescue your animal, get help.  By keeping them leashed or tied up you prevent any tragic accidents from happening.

14  9/karellaice.pdf 9/karellaice.pdf  ety/safety/boatwater/cold-water.pdf ety/safety/boatwater/cold-water.pdf


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