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1 Sequential Logic Building Blocks – Flip-flops (Week 9 – Lecture 1 of 1)

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1 1 Sequential Logic Building Blocks – Flip-flops (Week 9 – Lecture 1 of 1)

2 2 NAND Gate Latch The two NAND gates are cross- coupled so that the output of NAND-1 is connected to one of the input of NAND-2, and vice versa. The gate output, labeled Q and Q’, respectively, are latch out-put. Under normal conditions, these output will always be the inverse of each other. There are two latch inputs: a) the SET input is the input that sets Q to the 1 state. b) The CLEAR input is the input that resets Q to the 0 state.

3 3 NAND Gate Latch The SET and CLEAR inputs are both normally resting in the HIGH state. And One of them will be pulsed LOW whenever we want to change the latch outputs. 1 1

4 4 NAND Gate Latch ( condition SET =1, RESET = 1) 1 1 0 1 a) When we have Q = 0 and Q’ = 1. With Q = 0, the inputs to NAND-2 are 0 and 1, which produce Q’ =1. The 1 from Q’ causes NAND-1 to have a 1 at both inputs to produce a 0 output at Q. In effect, resultant a LOW at the output NAND-1 and HIGH at the output NAND-2

5 5 b) When we have Q = 1 and Q’ = 0. With Q = 1, the inputs to NAND-2 are 1 and 1, which produce Q’ =0. The 0 from Q’ causes NAND-1 to have a input 1 and 0 to produce a 1 output at Q. In effect, resultant a HIGH at the output NAND-1 and LOW at the output NAND-2 NAND Gate Latch ( condition SET =1, CLEAR = 1) 1 1 1 0

6 6 Summary of condition SET = 1 and CLEAR =1. Thus, there are two possible output states when SET and CLEAR = 1, which are either Q =0 and Q’ = 1 or Q =1 and Q’ = 0. The outputs are remain unchanged comparing with previous state even there is new clock pulse or new input S =1 and R =1

7 7 NAND Gate Latch ( setting latch, SET = 0, Clear = 1) t0 t1 a)If Q = 0 and Q’ = 1 at prior to the occurrence of the pulse ( the previous state) As SET is pulse LOW at time t0, Q will go High ( Q = 1). And this cause Q’ to go LOW ( Q’ = 0). So that, NAND-1 has two LOW inputs. 1 Thus,, when SET returns to the 1 state at t1, the NAND-1 output remains HIGH, which in turn, keeps the NAND-2 output LOW

8 8 NAND Gate Latch ( setting latch, SET = 0, Clear = 1) t0 t1 1 b)If Q = 1 and Q’ = 0 at prior to the occurrence of the pulse ( the previous state) As Q’ = 0 is keeping the NAND-1 output remain HIGH, the LOW pulse will not effect the output of NAND-1. Thus, when SET returns HIGH at t1, the latch outputs are still in the Q= 1 and Q’ =0 ( no change state)

9 9 Summary of condition SET = 0 and CLEAR =1. Thus, A LOW pulse on the SET input will always cause the latch to end up in the Q = 1 state and Q’ =0. This operation is called setting the latch or FF NAND Gate Latch ( setting latch, SET = 0, Clear = 1)

10 10 NAND Gate Latch ( resetting latch, SET = 1, Clear = 0) t0 t1 1 a)If Q = 0 and Q’ = 1 at prior to the occurrence of the pulse ( the previous state) As CLEAR is pulse LOW and SET is pulse 1 at time t0, Q’ = 1 Since, Q = 0 is keeping the NAND-2 output HIGH, the LOW pulse at CLEAR will not have any effect to the output. When, CLEAR returns HIGH at t1, the latch output are remain Q = 0 and Q’ = 1

11 11 b)If Q = 1 and Q’ = 0 at prior to the occurrence of the pulse ( the previous state) As CLEAR is pulse LOW at time t0, Q’ = 1 Since, Q’ = 1, it will forces Q to go LOW, Q = 0. and now NAND-2 has two inputs. Thus, when, CLEAR returns HIGH at t1, the latch output NAND-2 HIGH and NAND-1 keep LOW NAND Gate Latch ( resetting latch, SET = 1, Clear = 0) 1 t0 t1

12 12 NAND Gate Latch ( resetting latch, SET = 1, Clear = 0) Summary of condition SET = 1 and CLEAR =0. Thus, A LOW pulse on the CLEAR input will always cause the latch to end up in the Q = 0 state and Q’ =1. This operation is called clearing or resetting the latch

13 13  When SET and CLEAR inputs are simultaneously pulsed LOW, this will produce HIGH levels at both NAND output, Q = 1 and Q’ = 1.  This is am undesired condition because the two outputs are supposed to be inverses of each other. NAND Gate Latch ( resetting latch, SET = 0, Clear = 0) 0 0

14 14 NAND Gate Latch ( overall) 1. SET = 1, CLEAR = 1 Resting State (no change) 2. SET = 0, CLEAR = 1 Setting the latch 3. SET = 1, CLEAR = 0 Clearing / Resetting the latch 4. SET = 0, CLEAR = 0 Invalid state(unpredictable result)

15 15 NAND Gate Latch Example: Assume that Q = 0 initially, and determine the Q waveform for the NAND latch input of figure below.

16 16 NOR Gate Latch Two cross-coupled NOR gates can be used as a NOR gate latch. The arrangement is similar to the NAND latch except the Q and Q’ output have reversed position.

17 17 NOR Gate Latch 1. SET = 0, CLEAR = 0 Resting State (no change) 2. SET = 1, CLEAR = 0 Setting the latch ( Q = 1 ) 3. SET = 0, CLEAR = 1 Clearing / Resetting the latch ( Q = 0 ) 4. SET = 1, CLEAR = 1 Invalid state(unpredictable result)

18 18 NOR Gate Latch Example: Assume that Q = 0 initially, and determine the Q waveform for the NOR latch input of figure below.

19 19 Clock Signals Digital system operate either asynchronously or synchronously. Asynchronous systems - outputs of logic circuit can change state any time one or more of the inputs change. Synchronous systems - the exact time any output can change states are determined by the clock signal. Clock signal is a rectangular pulse train or square wave.

20 20 Clock Signals Positive-going transition (PGT) - clock change from 0 to 1 Negative-going transition (NGT) - clock change from 1 to 0

21 21 Clock Signals Clocked Flip Flops have a clock input (CLK) that is active on either the PGT or the NGT. The control inputs determine the effect of the active clock transition.

22 22 Clocked S-C Flip-Flop Clocked S-C flip-flop with positive-going edge trigger.

23 23 Clocked S-C flip-flop with negative-going edge trigger. Clocked S-C Flip-Flop

24 24 Logic Diagram of Clocked S-C / S-R Flip-Flop

25 25 Clocked S-C Flip-Flop Waveform of the Clocked S-C flip- flop with positive- going edge trigger.

26 26 Clocked J-K Flip-Flop Clocked J-K flip-flop with positive-going edge trigger.

27 27 Clocked J-K flip-flop with negative-going edge trigger. Clocked J-K Flip-Flop

28 28 Logic Diagram for a Clocked J-K Flip-flop

29 29 Clocked J-K Flip-Flop Waveform of the Clocked J-K flip-flop with positive-going edge trigger.

30 30 Clocked D Flip-Flop Implementation of the D Flip-Flop. An edge-triggered D flip-flop is easily implemented by adding a single INVERTER to the edge-triggered J-K flip-flop.

31 31 Clocked D Flip-Flop D Latch (Transparent Latch). Q output will follow D as long as EN is HIGH. If EN goes LOW, Q output will become latched to the value that D.

32 32 Clocked D Flip-Flop ( Example): Assume that Q = 0 initially. Determine the Q waveform for a D latch with the EN and D inputs of figure below.

33 33 Clocked T Flip-Flop Implementation of the T Flip-Flop. An edge-triggered T flip-flop is easily implemented by connecting J and K inputs together in an edge-triggered J-K flip-flop. T CLK

34 34 Asynchronous Inputs Most clocked FFs also have one or more asynchronous inputs which operate independently of the synchronous inputs and clock input. Asynchronous inputs can be used to override all the other inputs in order to place the FF in one state or the other at any time.

35 35 Asynchronous Inputs Example showing how a clocked flip-flop responds to asynchronous inputs.

36 36 Master-Slave J-K Flip-Flop A master-slave flip-flop contains two flip-flops/latches: 1. Master S-C latch (S-C Flip-Flop) - receives data while the input trigger clock is HIGH. 2. Slave S-C latch (S-C Flip-Flop) - receives data from the master and output it when the clock goes LOW.

37 37  Two RS flip-flops are combined together using an inverter to construct a master-slave JK flip-flop.  When the clock input Cp is 0, the output of the inverter is 1. The slave latch is then enabled, and its output Q is equal to the master latch output. The master latch is disabled, because Cp is 0.  When a logic-1 clock pulse is applied, the values on S and R control the value stored in the master latch. The slave is disabled as long as the pulse remains at the 1 level, because its Cp input is equal to 0. Any changes in the external S and R inputs change the master output, but cannot affect the slave output.  When the pulse returns to 0, the master is disabled and is isolated from the S and R inputs. At the same time, the slave is enabled, and the current value of master output is transferred to the output of the flip-flop (slave output). Master-Slave J-K Flip-Flop – Operation of the Circuit

38 38 Master-Slave J-K Flip-Flop - Truth Table INPUTSOUTPUT JKCLKQQ’STATE 00PULSEQ0Q’0NO CHANGE 01PULSE01RESET 10PULSE10SET 11PULSEQ’0Q0TOGGLE

39 39 Master-Slave J-K Flip-Flop – Timing Diagram Note: Here NC means no change.

40 40 Master-Slave J-K Flip-Flop Master-slave flip-flops are called pulse-triggered or level triggered devices because input data are read during the entire time that the clock pulse is at a HIGH level. The master-slave flip-flops has become obsolete (examples: TTL 7473, 7476 and 74107.) The newer IC in this series have been manufactured as edge-triggered flip- flops (example: 74LS76 and 74LS107)

41 41 Flip-Flop Application Edge-triggered (clocked) flip-flops can be used in a wide variety of applications, such as data storage, transferring data from one location to another, counting, etc. The most common use of flip-flops is for the storage of data or information by using groups of flip-flops called registers. To transfer data from one location to another, we need groups of flip-flops called shift register arranged in such a way so that the data in binary numbers form can be stored and shifted from one flip-flop to the next for every clock pulse. The application of flip-flops in counting is referred to as frequency division. By using appropriate number of flip-flops, the circuit could divide a frequency by any power of 2.

42 42 Flip-Flop Synchronization Most digital systems are synchronous in their operation. However there will be an external signal that is not synchronized to the clock. Asynchronous signals often occur as a result of a human operator’s actuating an input at random time relative to the clock signal. The asynchronous signals can produce unpredictable and undesirable results. Flip-Flop can be used to synchronize the effect of an asynchronous input.

43 43 Flip-Flop Synchronization The problem with the circuit below is that A is asynchronous; it can change states at any time.

44 44 Flip-Flop Synchronization This can produce partial clock pulses at output X, as shown in the wave forms below.

45 45 Flip-Flop Synchronization To overcome this problem, the A signal is connected to the D input of a flip-flop, which is clocked by the NGT of the clock signal.

46 46 Flip-Flop Synchronization Thus, when A goes HIGH, Q will not go HIGH until the next NGT of the clock at time T1. This HIGH at Q will enable the AND gate to pass subsequent complete clock pulses to X. When A goes LOW, Q will not go LOW until the next NGT of the clock at T2. Thus the AND gate will not inhibit clock pulses until the clock pulse that ends at T2 has been passed through to X.

47 47 Astable/Monostable Multivibrators A multivibrator is an electronic circuit used to implement a variety of simple two-state systems such as oscillators, timers and flip-flops. It is characterized by two amplifying devices (transistors, electron tubes or other devices) cross-coupled by resistors and capacitors.electronic circuitoscillatorstimersflip-flops There are three types of multivibrator circuit: astable, in which the circuit is not stable in either state—it continuously oscillates from one state to the other. Due to this, it does not require a input (Clock pulse or other). monostable, in which one of the states is stable, but the other is not— the circuit will flip into the unstable state for a determined period, but will eventually return to the stable state. Such a circuit is useful for creating a timing period of fixed duration in response to some external event. This circuit is also known as a one shot. A common application is in eliminating switch bounce.switch bounce bistable, in which the circuit will remain in either state indefinitely. The circuit can be flipped from one state to the other by an external event or trigger. Such a circuit is important as the fundamental building block of a register or memory device. This circuit is also known as a latch or a flip-flop.registermemorylatch flip-flop

48 48 Astable/Monostable Multivibrators

49 49 Astable Multivibrators Astable Multivibrator: An astable multivibrators is also called a free-running multivibrators. The astable multivibrators generates a continuous flow of pulse. The versatile 555 Timer IC can be used to implement an astable multivibrators. The output frequency of the multivibrator can be increased by decreasing the value of the resistors and/or capacitor.

50 50 Astable Multivibrators

51 51 Monostable Multivibrators Monostable Multivibrator: A monostable multivibrator is also called a one-shot multivibrator. When the one-shot is triggered, the multivibrator generates a single short pulse. The input trigger may be an entire pulse, a L-to-H or H-to-L trasition of the trigger pulse. The output pulse may be either a positive or a negative pulse. The time duration of the output pulse can be adjusted by using different resistor-capacitor combinations.

52 52 Monostable Multivibrators 555 timer IC wired as a monostable multivibrator

53 53 Monostable Multivibrators 74121 IC wired to generate single clock pulse


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