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Chapter Six: Business Security 1.  Retail Stores  Stores can be and often are the targets of crime from inside and outside the business itself  Crimes.

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Presentation on theme: "Chapter Six: Business Security 1.  Retail Stores  Stores can be and often are the targets of crime from inside and outside the business itself  Crimes."— Presentation transcript:

1 Chapter Six: Business Security 1

2  Retail Stores  Stores can be and often are the targets of crime from inside and outside the business itself  Crimes and security problems in stores run the gamut from all the crimes of violence to property crimes (burglar, vandalism, internal theft)  They are also subject to an enormous amount of “White Collar” crimes (computer crime, bad checks, credit card crimes, forgery, embezzlement…) 2

3  Retail Stores  Loss Prevention is one of the largest concerns of the retail business in the U.S. ▪ Shoplifting and employee theft are major security problems with most retail businesses ▪ Most large retail business have a propriety security department, which performs numerous duties regarding loss prevention, safety and internal auditing 3

4  Convenience Stores  Sherman reports the Convenience Store industry has conducted some of the most sophisticated crime prevention experiments available ▪ There are two types of stores: ▪ Those with few or no robberies (no crime prevention efforts needed) ▪ Those with several robberies (prevention efforts will be more productive) 4

5  Convenience Stores  The National Association of Convenience Stores ▪ Based on studies the NACS recommends the following methods to maintain security and reduce crime: ▪ Cash control ▪ Visibility ▪ Eliminating escape routes ▪ Employee training 5

6  Convenience Stores  The National Association of Convenience Stores “Cash Control” includes keeping as little cash as possible in the cash register and putting all other cash in a secure “drop safe” that employees cannot access “Visibility” entails good lighting on the inside and outside of the store and clear views of all areas of the store from the clerk’s position in the front of the store and from the outside 6

7  Convenience Stores  The National Association of Convenience Stores ▪ “Eliminating Escape Routes” means locking other exit doors and having only one escape route that exits the suspect into the lighted areas or area videoed by electronic surveillance ▪ “Employee Training” includes ensuring clerks and other employees remain calm during crimes and other incidents and do not resist robberies 7

8  Convenience Stores  The implementation of crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) strategies can be highly effective in reducing the incidence of robbery ▪ Remain calm ▪ Do not resist robberies 8

9  Convenience Stores  The National Association of Convenience Stores does not recommend the below as effective deterrents to crime ▪ Concealed weapons ▪ Bullet resistant barriers ▪ Multiple clerks ▪ Security guards 9

10  Fast Food Restaurants  “Fast Food” restaurant security is very similar to the security provided for Convenience Stores  Video surveillance systems with “Text Insertion” are very useful to prevent insider or employee theft ▪ “Text Insertion” is a feature that displays cash register activity on corresponding surveillance footage 10

11  Fast Food Restaurants  The Athena Research Corporation interviewed hundreds of young robbers and found that security features do not always deter young robbers ▪ These individuals naively think they will not be caught ▪ They have planned out their escape routes 11

12  Fast Food Restaurants  The Athena Research Corporation recommends: ▪ Keeping the cash register in a position to allow a clear, unobstructed view from the street ▪ Post signs that say the cash register contains only a small amount of cash ▪ Train employees to be aware of their surroundings and take note of robber’s physical description, clothing, weapon, body art and get away vehicle 12

13  Fast Food Restaurants  The Athena Research Corporation recommends: ▪ Improve lighting in work areas, parking lots… ▪ Never leave the back or side doors unlocked or propped open ▪ Install panic buttons or silent alarms ▪ Use physical features to limit access and escape routes 13

14  Fast Food Restaurants  The Athena Research Corporation recommends: ▪ Train employees not to resist the robber ▪ Do not talk to the robber ▪ Do not allow customers to leave until interviewed by the police ▪ Have visible monitoring at the entrance where customers can see them 14

15  Fast Food Restaurants  The nation’s economic situation has contributed to an increase in some crimes that were unheard of or very rare ▪ Theft of grease for biodiesel fuel ▪ Put outside, with the trash, because of the smell ▪ This may raise the issue of “abandonment” for police in prosecuting the case ▪ California v. Greenwood (1988) 15

16 16  Reasonable Expectation of Privacy/Property  California v. Greenwood (1988) ▪ Police waited for the trash to be collected by trash collectors, searched through the trash and obtained a search warrant for the residence based on what they found inside the trash bags

17 17  Reasonable Expectation of Privacy/Property  California v. Greenwood (1988) ▪ Greenwood did not have a level of expectation of privacy that society was will to recognize as reasonable ▪ It is common knowledge that garbage bags left on the side of the street are readily accessible to animals, children and snoops

18 18  Reasonable Expectation of Privacy/Property  California v. Greenwood (1988) ▪ The reason people place their trash at the road is to convey to third parties that they are through with the objects and no longer want them for their personal use

19  Shopping Centers and Malls  Problems associated with Shopping Center and Malls include vandalism, loss prevention, order maintenance, crowd control, parking security, theft of automobiles, theft from automobiles, terrorism and pedestrian safety  Shopping Center or Mall security can have a huge impact on consumers perception of safety ▪ This may determine where they shop 19

20  Shopping Centers and Malls  Architectural design, which includes lighting, security cameras and roving security patrols can help minimize the likelihood of shopping center and mall crime in parking lots 20

21  Shopping Centers and Malls  Research has indicated that there is evidence of a correlation between crime at malls and the presence of “problematic” persons (gangs and loitering youths)  As a result most malls create a “Code of Conduct” for the mall and develop partnerships with law enforcement to ensure a safe shopping environment 21

22  Shopping Centers and Malls  The public posting of these “Codes of Conduct” at the entrances and throughout the malls helps reassure shoppers that the shopping center is a controlled environment where their shopping experience will not be disturbed by aggressive, illegal or offensive behavior 22

23  Shopping Centers and Malls  Research has discovered that many shopping center managers are placing local law enforcement substations or officers on the premises  This type of initiative affords the shopping center the benefit of increasing police presence without having to pay the officers’ salaries  Research further shows that regular police patrols had a far greater impact on mall motor vehicle theft than did private security patrols 23

24  Shopping Centers and Malls  Another security technique is the “Retail Alert System” which allows for simultaneous voice, video and data transmission, merchants can immediately notify other merchants in the mall of possible shoplifters or persons passing bad checks This system also allows for credit card verification and other business applications  Former telephone systems could take hours for all stores to be notified 24

25  Industrial Facilities, Factories and Warehouses  The major security concerns at industrial facilities, factories and warehouses are:  Property protection  Theft  Security of proprietary or classified information  Fire protection  Safety  Traffic control 25

26  Industrial Facilities, Factories and Warehouses  Previously uncommon criminal trends have cropped up in recent years  Scrap metal theft  Industrial theft  Frivolous injury claims 26

27  Industrial Facilities, Factories and Warehouses  New threats have arisen, target materials that previously would not have been considered high plausibility targets  Scrap metal  Toxic chemicals  Biomedical wastes  Flammable materials 27

28  Office Buildings  The major security problems for commercial office buildings are after hour burglaries and thefts, unauthorized visitors and incidents of internal theft  Security personnel from a central station, using electronic video surveillance, can effectively monitor large commercial office buildings  Assess control and making regular security checks throughout the building supplement the central station 28

29  Office Buildings  Addition recommendations include: Turnstiles to control traffic moving through the lobby area Transferring employees and operations to backup sites outside major urban centers “Temporary Badging” for visitors, contractors… “Expiring Time Badging” allows visitor badges to change colors when the badge is no longer valid, showing the wearer is no longer authorized to be in the building 29

30  Office Buildings  The Comcast Center has resorted to non traditional means of recruiting  Now, building security recruits in concierge associations and universities with schools of hospitality  Advertised as “customer service” not “security” 30

31  Public and Private Utilities  Public utilities provide gas, telephone, electricity, water…. to the public  Most public and private utilities have a proprietary security staff supplemented by contract security guards  They are concerned about terrorism, sabotage, destruction of property and assets, theft of services and assets, personal protection of employees… 31

32  Dams  The Army Corps of Engineers conducts studies of possible security problems at dams  Conducted a study to determine that a terrorist attack against the Kensico Dan in Westchester County would be catastrophic  Flooding  Drinking water supply to NYC 32

33  Dams  The latest report from the National Research Institute indicated that security at our nation’s dams is lacking  Need better communication  The Federal Bureau of Reclamation (monitor water and power flow) are disconnected from security and police 33

34  Oil Facilities  The oil and gas industry assets are uniquely valuable and distinctly valuable in today’s complex geopolitical environment  Security is needed at the:  Extraction  Production  transportation 34

35  Chemical Facilities  The chemical industry engages in security measures and most firms generally operate a proprietary security and contract security system at their facilities  The Congressional General Accounting Office reported that 123 chemical plants across the county could each expose more than 1 million people to serous health issues if a chemical release occurred 35

36  Chemical Facilities  The U.S. Department of Homeland Security imposed federal security regulations for high risk chemical facilities  Requires chemical facilities to prepare Security Vulnerability Assessments  Identify security vulnerabilities  Implement site security plans 36

37  Nuclear Power Plants  The physical security of nuclear power plants and their vulnerabilities to deliberate acts of terrorism was elevated to a national security concern following 9/11  Nuclear power plant security requirements are established and enforced by the Nuclear Regulator Commission 37

38  Nuclear Power Plants  To strengthen nuclear plant security inspections, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Act required the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to conduct “force on force” security exercises at nuclear power plants at least once every three years  Also included provisions for fingerprinting and criminal background checks 38

39  Hotels and Motels  The primary security problems associated with hotels and motels are:  The personal safety of guests  Theft from guests rooms  Thefts of and from autos in parking lots  Vandalism 39

40  Hotels and Motels  McGoey’s advise for travelers to keep safe  Choose a room above the fifth floor (less access)  Choose a room in the middle of the hallway (away from fire escapes)  Choose a hotel with solid core or mental doors (doors should be self locking)  Doors should have electronic access cards  Doors should have wide angle peepholes 40

41  Banks  The primary security concerns at banks are the protection of:  The protection assets and information  The protection of employees and patrons  The prevention of crimes at their facility  Computer crimes  “White Collar” crimes 41

42  Banks  The are three traditional security methods used by banks to prevent robberies:  Security Officers  Contract or Proprietary  Armed or Unarmed  Cash Control  Vaults and Tellers  Dye Packs 42

43  Banks  Other security methods used by banks to prevent robberies include:  Metal Detection Portals  Constructed of bullet resistant materials  When a weapon is detected  Alarms sound  Inner doors of the bank lock  Customer Assisted Depositories (like night drops) 43

44  Sporting Arenas and Ballparks  Security problems at sporting arenas and ballparks include:  Order Maintenance  Crowd Control  Illegal Entry  Vandalism  Theft of Property from Patrons or Vendors 44

45  Sporting Arenas and Ballparks  Security is provided by proprietary and contract security  Yankees/Red Sox baseball games  2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, China 45

46  Sporting Arenas and Ballparks  Access control is very important at stadiums to ensure that only persons who have paid for a ticket are granted access  New technology thwarts the use of counterfeit tickets  If the ticket is counterfeit or already used the turnstile will lock and the ticketholder will be investigated  “Flash Seats” controls the resale of tickets matching the ticket to DL’s or Credit Cards 46

47  Sporting Arenas and Ballparks  Access control is very important at stadiums to ensure that only persons who have paid for a ticket are granted access  New technology thwarts the use of counterfeit tickets  If the ticket is counterfeit or already used the turnstile will lock and the ticketholder will be investigated  “Flash Seats” controls the resale of tickets matching the ticket to DL’s or Credit Cards 47

48  Sporting Arenas and Ballparks  Access control is very important at stadiums to ensure that only persons who have paid for a ticket are granted access  New technology thwarts the use of counterfeit tickets  If the ticket is counterfeit or already used the turnstile will lock and the ticketholder will be investigated  “Flash Seats” controls the resale of tickets matching the ticket to DL’s or Credit Cards 48

49  Sporting Arenas and Ballparks  Violence control is also a major issue in sports arena security  Fan violence (players, stampeding, rioting…)  Security cameras for later identification  Weapons screening 49

50  Movies, Theaters and Clubs  The major security problems at movie houses, theaters and clubs are order maintenance, crowd control, illegal entry and thefts from patrons and vendors  Smaller venues have contract security  Large venues have proprietary security  Some bring their own security 50

51  Movies, Theaters and Clubs  At a club in Ohio, “Dimebag” Darrell Abbott, a heavy metal guitarist for the band “Damageplan” was gunned down along with three others by an audience member  Security advise  Search backpacks and conduct pat downs  Scan crowd for suspicious activity  Metal detectors 51

52  Pools and Beaches  The major concerns at pools and beaches are order maintenance, crowd control, parking and the safety of users and employees  The first responder at pools and beaches is likely to be a lifeguard  Members of “Beach Patrol” security often augment the security and safety provided by on duty life guards 52

53  Amusement Parks  The major security concerns facing amusement parks are order maintenance, crowd control, access control, parking and the safety of visitors and employees  Almost all amusement parks operate a proprietary security department and hire extra contract security guards when necessary 53

54  Cruise Ships  Crimes at sea often fall into a jurisdictional “no mans land” of law enforcement  If the ship is in the waters of a foreign country the crime will be reported to that country  But may not be investigated by that country  Sexual assaults are the most common crime  Not the country of registry of the ship  All major cruise lines have security managers 54

55  Casinos  Casinos have numerous security concerns, safety of patrols and employees, protection of assets of the casino from robbery and theft, order maintenance and crowd control  Casinos usually have proprietary security and hire some contract security for certain duties  Casinos use sophisticated access control and video surveillance systems and make extensive use of armed security guards 55

56  Casinos  Casino gaming areas are usually monitored from the casino’s control center  Educated and trained in all forms of cheating and scams associated with each game  Education comes from the casino, police and state gaming commission 56


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