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Functional Assessment Intervention System (FAIS)- Full FAIS version AVRSB Psychology November 2007.

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Presentation on theme: "Functional Assessment Intervention System (FAIS)- Full FAIS version AVRSB Psychology November 2007."— Presentation transcript:

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2 Functional Assessment Intervention System (FAIS)- Full FAIS version AVRSB Psychology November 2007

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4 A Learning Year This is a different approach to behavioral programming. We are trying to get consistency across the AVRSB – provincial initiative For this year, regardless of your familiarity with the FAIS, we are asking that FAIS LIGHTs and FULL FAISs are done with psychology personnel.

5 Continuum of School-Wide.Instructional and Positive.Behaviour Support 5%   TERTIARY PREVENTION PRIMARY PREVENTION   80% SECONDARY PREVENTION SECONDARY PREVENTION   15% Green Zone Yellow Zone Red Zone

6 FAIS and PEBS Every behaviour has a function. Identify the function of the problem behaviour. Teach an alternative behaviour that serves the same function. Adapt environment to promote use of alternative behaviour. “Behaviour is predictable, thus preventable”

7 What is predictable is preventable

8 FAIS-Light versus Full FAIS Alien versus Predator?

9 FAIS-Light vs. FAIS FAIS-Light Tool for initial problem clarification Uses anecdotal information Creates a plan with strategies Can use it to start planning, even for “red zone” kids FAIS Involves more precise goal setting Involves data tracking Used when FAIS-Light proves insufficient Usually for those with significant history of very aggressive behavior (physically assaultive behavior)

10 FAIS Light vs. FAIS FAIS-Light 14 year old boy habitually tells teacher to “stuff it” when told to finish worksheet FULL FAIS 14 year old boy habitually picks up chair and throws it at the teacher when told to finish worksheet. The FAIS-light strategies have not changed this.

11 Analogy with Programming FAIS Light = Adaptations FULL FAIS = Individual Program Plan

12 FAIS - Program Planning Process 1. Identification of student with behaviours of concern. 2. Exploration of classroom strategies by teacher/Problem-Solving meeting at school. 3. Referral to Program Planning Team meeting to complete the FAIS Light (parents, teachers, administrator, Guidance, School Psychologist, other Student Services staff as appropriate).

13 FAIS - Program Planning Process (cont.) 4. Follow-up Program Planning Team meetings to evaluate FAIS Light plan. 5. Next step: Monitor/Revise plan. The team may decide to do a full FAIS. 6. Full FAIS conducted with the program planning team

14 Who helps with Full FAIS planning? For the next two years, the FAIS would be facilitated by a member of the Behavior Intervention Team Eventually, the full FAIS will be facilitated by school psychologists as well as the Behavior Intervention Team

15 Flow Chart for Now Problem-solving meeting at school FAIS Light consult with School Psychologist Full FAIS with Behavior Intervention Team

16 The importance of planning

17 Why Do Program Plans Flop? Lack of knowledge/skill Beliefs and attitudes Lack of adequate resources and support Lack of collaboration FAIS system helps address these

18 DAY ONE Social Competence Checklist Section 1 Identifying Priority Concern Identifying Context/Setting Conditions Identifying Consequences or Effects Identifying the Function of Behavior Identifying Competencies and Positive Alternatives Develop a Summary Statement

19 DAY 1 Section 2 Indicate Desired Outcomes and Social Validation Criteria Establish the Goal Define Benchmarks

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21 DAY TWO Section 3 Brainstorm Support Strategies Specify Positive Support Plan Section 4 Indicate Progress Monitoring Procedures Complete Information on Goal Attainment Ratings Record Benchmark Ratings on Goal Attainment Chart Record Other Progress-Monitoring Data on Progress Rating Chart

22 DAY TWO Section 5 Summarize Student’s Progress toward Goal Analyze Progress Plan Next Steps Design New Strategies Specify Final Team Recommendations and Consensus Statement Crisis Plan

23 How Does the FAIS work with EA Allocation? Cindy Giffen and Holly Stephenson DO THE FAIS REGARDLESSOF WHETHER A DIAGNOSIS EXISTS!

24 Bring into your Mind... The child with the most challenging behaviours you are working with now…

25 Insanity Ensues

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27 Social Competence Performance Checklist (SCPC) a.k.a. – Social Competency Scale or Social Competency Checklist Helpful first step in assessment & planning (FAIS- Light or FAIS- Full) Focuses team on student strengths – re-defines student as more than “problem behaviour” Breaks-down problem behaviour(s) into manageable targets Identifies Priority Concern Can be used to evaluate progress

28 Keep it simple

29 Design of SPC Checklist 4 pt. rating scale based on frequency of occurrence 0 - rarely 1 - sometimes 2 - often 3 - mostly (N – no opportunity to observe) 3 sections A) Positive Behaviour Ratings (Pos+) B) Challenging Behaviour Ratings (Neg-) C) Intervention Planning Chart

30 4 Areas of Behaviour Observations (for Pos+ and Neg- Behaviours) A) Pos+ Behaviors Self-control Social Competence Learning Behaviour Academic Performance Other B) Neg- Behaviours Aggression Distractibility Non-compliance Neg- Affect (mood) Other

31 C) Intervention Planning Chart Positive BehavioursStrength (Rated 3) Concern (Rated 0 or 1 and Checked Self-control Social Competence Learning Behaviours Academic Performance Other Pos+ behaviours Challenging BehavioursStrength (Rated 0) Concern (Rated 3 and Checked) Aggression Distractibility Non-compliance Negative Affect Priority Concern

32 How to complete SCP Checklist Pos+ Behaviours 1. Rate frequency of Pos+ behaviours in each observation area (0-3) 2. Check the 3 Pos+ behaviour items that are most important to address (only 3!) 3. Write the item # of the top 3 (checked) Pos+ behaviours Neg- Behaviours 1. Rate frequency of Neg- behaviours in each observation area (0-3) 2. Check the 3 Neg- behaviour items that are most important to address (only 3!) 3.Write the item # of the top 3 (checked) Neg- behaviours

33 Complete Intervention Planning Chart Pos+ Behaviours For each behaviour area - 1)Identify STRENGTHS List items rated 3 2) Identify CONCERNS List items rated 0 or 1 and checked Neg- Behaviours For each behaviour area - 1)Identify STRENGTHS List items rated 0 2) Identify CONCERNS List items rated 3 and checked

34 Complete Intervention Planning Chart Positive BehavioursStrength (Rated 3) Concern (Rated 0 or 1 and Checked Self-control Social Competence Learning Behaviours Academic Performance Other Pos+ behaviours Challenging BehavioursStrength (Rated 0) Concern (Rated 3 and Checked) Aggression Distractibility Non-compliance Negative Affect Priority Concern

35 Section 1: Identify Concern, Function, and Positive Alternative Behavior A.Identify Priority Concern B.Identify Context/Setting Conditions C.Identify Consequences or Effects D.Identify the Function of the Behaviour E.Identify Competencies and Positive Alternatives F.Develop Summary Statement

36 Section 1. A. Identify the Priority Concern What difficulty or problem is causing the greatest concern?

37 Criteria for Identifying and Describing the Priority Concern Have the classroom teacher identify the concern that MOST interferes with the child’s productive functioning and the learning environment. As a team, describe the concerns in concrete and observable terms, when it happens, and how it happens. Ensure there is consensus regarding the behaviour description. USE THE SOCIAL COMPETENCE CHECKLIST!

38 Examples of a Priority Concern:  Running off school property  Striking out physically at classmates  Destroying work materials/property  Verbal outbursts in class BE SPECIFIC!

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40 B. Identifying Context/Setting Conditions Describe distant or proximal situations that contribute to the behaviour. Setting (e.g., hallways) Task/Activity (e.g., large group) Specific Triggers (e.g., adult request)

41 Check all context or setting conditions in which the student is most likely to have difficulties. Setting Classroom Special Class Hallways Cafeteria Playground Bus Gym/Locker room Restroom Home Community setting Unstructured setting Unfamiliar setting Crowded setting Noisy setting Other Task/Activity Large group Small group Partner task Independent task Difficult task Uninteresting task Specific task Specific materials Task transition Location transition Unstructured activity Unexpected activity Interruption in routine Other Specific Triggers Not receiving attention Adult request Negative feedback Positive feedback Unclear expectations Sleepiness Physical discomfort Sick, allergies Over-stimulated Under-Stimulated Extreme Emotion Denied something Health issue Home issue Other Time of Day Arrival time Dismissal time Morning Afternoon Lunch Recess Non-specific Other Individuals Involved Particular adult(s) Particular peer(s) Authority figure Support staff Parents Strangers Other

42 Setting/Contexts Keep the team focused on the priority concern! Do not check off everything – only the MOST salient contexts

43 Does the school drive the child crazy?

44 C. Identify Consequences or Effects Behavior Ignored Request/Task Removed Reprimand/Warning Time out Loss of privileges Negative social interaction Peer encouragement Teacher negotiation Office referral Home contact In school suspension/punishment Out of school suspension TEACH A NEW BEHAVIOR?????

45 How effective were these consequences? Never Rarely Sometimes Often Not attempted This section allows for notes

46 C. Identifying Consequences Identifying what typically happens in response to the behavior of concern What have you tried already? and how effective has this been IN REDUCING THE BEHAVIOR?

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48 D. Identifying the Function of the Behaviour As a team, identify the apparent functions (underlying reasons, intents, or pay-offs) that cause the behaviour of concern.

49 C. Identify the Function of the Behavior Check all that apply. Escape Avoid demand or request Avoid/Escape activity or task Escape classroom or setting Escape the school Escape consequences Other: Gain Attention/Control Get desired item Gain adult attention Gain peer attention Control situation Gain/Grab power Gain acceptance Other : Other Functions Communication Affiliation/Affirm ation Self -expression Gratification Justice/Revenge Self-stimulation Other Other Reasons Does not have skills Does not have motivation Does not know expectations Fears failure Medical problem Attentional problem Substance abuse Lack of security Transitional issue (e.g., divorce, home conflict) Other:

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51 E. Identify Competencies and Positive Alternatives Similar to FAIS light, but can add student assets and home/school assets. USE SOCIAL COMPETENCE CHECKLIST! Describe social or academic competencies that may serve as a positive alternative to the concern: e.g., good oral reader – could get class attention for this Good guitar player – approach about playing at a school function

52 F. Develop Summary Statement The behavior of concern________occurs in ______setting(s) in situations when________occurs. The function(s)_________underlie the behavior. The student has the following competencies:__________. Taking the function and the competencies into consideration___________ will serve as the positive alternative for the concern.

53 Summary Statement Example The behavior of concern, verbal outbursts, occurs during classtime, in situations when writing activities occur. The function(s) of peer attention-seeking underlies the behavior. The student has the following competencies: at grade level in most subjects, responds to peer redirection Taking the function and the competencies into consideration, giving him “points” for being quiet in class, that he can give to classmates, will serve as the positive alternative for the concern.

54 Section Two: Setting Goals and Benchmarks A.Indicate desired outcomes and social validation criteria B.Establish Goal C.Define Benchmarks

55 A. Indicate Desired Outcomes and Social Validation Criteria What is the desired outcome of intervention? – checklist of examples Completes work Complies with request Remains in the room. What is the standard or social-comparison criterion used to compare students performance?

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57 B. Establish Goal Statement of Goal Context for Goal performance Target date for goal attainment –e.g., “Within 10 weeks, Lisa will comply with adult requests to perform an activity with classmates one or more times each day with no teacher redirection or physical prompting”

58 What Kind of Goal? Improve Positive Behavior e.g., calm himself when upset raise hand in class make appropriate social overtures Reduce Challenging Behavior e.g.,disturbs others throwing of things in class reduce length or intensity of outbursts

59 Choosing Intervention Goals Just one works best Target a specific behavior of high priority Goal should be linked to keystone behaviors and outcomes Student must be capable of learning and performing goal behavior What can s/he attain IN 10 WEEKS?

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61 C. Define Benchmarks State what the student will do, at what level, and with what type of support. Order the benchmarks according to the scale provided (-3 to +3) “0” refers to the Status Quo, or baseline functioning

62 Benchmarks continued Think of a ladder to desired outcome +3 :competent behavior often (goal reached) +2 :competent behavior occurs sometimes +1 :competent behavior occurs rarely, minimally improved 0 : No apparent change or progress -1 : behavior is minimally worse -2 : behavior is somewhat worse -3 : behavior is much worse

63 Benchmark Dimensions that can be Altered Level of Support Needed –e.g., No more than three/two/one teacher prompts Frequency of behavior –e.g., At least one/two/three times per hour, subject, day Severity of behavior –e.g., Rough physical aggression, mild physical aggression, only verbal aggression Difficulty of Task –e.g., Addition of single digits/double digits/triple digits

64 Benchmark Dimensions continued Time needed to complete a task –Complete journal entry in 30/20/10 minutes Amount of work completed –Completes 25%, 50%, 75% of task Accuracy of work –Completes math assignments with 50%, 70%, 90% accuracy

65 The Benchmark Planner Appendix A in FAIS manual P. 132 Benchmark examples for each of the items on the Social Competence Checklist.

66 Benchmark Examples +3 Shares playground equipment 8 out of 10 recess periods per week +2 shares 6-7 out of 10 recess periods +1 shares 4-5 out of 10 recess periods 0 shares playground equipment 3 out of 10 recess periods a week -1 shares 2 out of 10 recess periods -2 shares 1 out of 10 -3 refuses to share playground equipment

67 Benchmarks + 3 Uses appropriate words to express frustration with work + 2 Uses words to express frustration with work +1 Grumbles or growls to express frustration with work 0 Grumbles about work pushing it off the table -1 Grumbles about work and crumples it -2 Destroys his work with verbal outburst -3 Destroys his work with physical outburst (upsetting desk)

68 Benchmark Examples continued +3 Follows teacher directions after 1-2 requests, teacher at a distance. +2 follows teacher direction after 2-3 requests, teacher at a distance +1 follows teacher direction after 2-3 requests, requires teacher proximity 0 follows teacher directions after 3-5 requests, requires teacher proximity -1 follows teacher directions after 3-5 requests, requires physical guidance. -2 refuses teacher directions. Verbal complaints after directive. -3 Refuses to follow teacher directions. Physically aggressive behavior erupts after directives

69 Section 3: Designing the Positive Support Plan A. Brainstorming Positive support strategies for the goal (Consulting Chapter 4 of the manual) B. Specifying the Positive Support Plan Determining who Determining when and where Determining resources needed for plan SPECIFY EA ROLE AND RESPONSIBILITIES!

70 Designing the Positive Support Plan Environmental strategies –Counter the influence of setting conditions or specific triggers Teaching strategies –Enhance or develop alternative behaviors that achieve the same function Altered Response strategies –Counter the functions or “pay offs” maintaining the priority concern

71 Go to Page 56! Table 4.1 Linking Potential Functions of Challenging Behaviors to Evidence-Based Strategies Table 4.2 Linking Concerns to Evidence-Based Strategies

72 Environmental Strategies Environmental strategies prevent or minimize the occurrence of the prioritized concern by adjusting or modifying the features of the classroom, school, or home environment.

73 Types of Environmental Strategies: A.Problem Preventers B.Modifying Classroom Arrangements C.Optimizing Rules, Routines, and Transitions D.Techniques for Matching Instructional Demand with Learning Capability

74 Modifying Seating Arrangement Examples of Individualized Choices: Asperger’s High school student – very upset by peer rule infractions – Sit in front row in all classes ADHD Middle school student – socially responsive - sit next to attentive buddy Anxiety Disordered Elementary Child – overwhelmed by class but sometimes curious – Sit in alternate “quiet spot” in view of the board

75 B.Environmental Strategies: Modifying Classroom Environment Seating Arrangement Adult Presence Optimize Room Arrangement

76 C.Environmental Strategies: Optimizing Rules, Routines, and Transitions Clarify Directions and Expectations Provide Equivalent Choices Scaffold Prompts and Practice

77 Clarify Directions and Expectations Use your PEBS matrix PEBS Matrix - Show respect for these things across school environments (eg. class, bus, assembly, etc) –Self –Others –Learning –Environment

78 PBIS COMPENDIUM Lesson Plan templates for each part of the PEBs matrix Provides LESSONS that explicitly teach expectations Key ingredients: –Describe the expectation skill and critical rule –Demonstrate the expectation (role plays)

79 Website with Matrix Lesson Plans Type “PBIS Compendium” at Google Go to: http://pbiscompendium.ssd.k12.mo.us/http://pbiscompendium.ssd.k12.mo.us/index.htm

80 Lesson Plan Example: Respect in the Hallway Skill and Critical Rule: “Today we are going to talk about ways to BE RESPECTFUL of yourself in the hallway.” “What are some ways we can BE RESPECTFUL of ourselves in the hallway?” Ask students to define what BEING RESPECTFUL means. Shape their responses into observable behaviors (e.g. if they want to be nice, ask for examples of being nice that equate to observable skills such as taking turns, asking someone to play, etc.) There are several ways to BE RESPECTFUL of ourselves. For example, we can: Walk down the hallway instead of running. Move purposefully down the hallway toward your destination. Move quietly down the hallway. Review above key behaviors and any other skills the students identify.

81 Lesson Plan Continued Demonstration and Role Play: Demonstrations: “I am going to show you some ways to BE RESPECTFUL of yourself and some ways to BE disrespectful. I want you to watch me and see if you can tell if I am BEING respectful of myself/yourself.” After each example ask the students if you were BEING RESPECTFUL of yourself. Ask what you might do instead during non-examples. Role Play: Walking with my hands all over the hallway displays. Staying in line to the right. Talking loudly when the teacher has asked you to remain quiet. Stopping every few feet and pulling on hallway displays.

82 Clarify Expectations Provide practice opportunities “Show me” as response to minor rule infractions REVIEW THROUGHOUT THE YEAR

83 C.Environmental Strategies: Optimizing Rules, Routines, and Transitions Schedules and Routines Consensus Classroom Rules Streamline Transitions

84 D.for Matching Instructional Demand and Learning Environmental Strategies: Techniques Capability Task-Skill Matching Class-Wide Peer Tutoring

85 Task-Skill Matching: Differentiated Instruction Lack of academic skills Function: Escape Acting out in class or work refusal/avoidance

86 Escape from academics

87 Differentiation Strategies Adaptations and Modifications (e.g., Cloze procedures for writing work) Ability groupings Preteaching – teachers and EAs must communicate!!! Prompt in-class scaffolding for the highest needs students Tiered or Tic Tac Toe assignments

88 Novelty Teaching to Maximize Involvement: Who answers in class? Koosh ball throwing Names from a hat Nominate students who call on other students Contest to see who gets to answer

89 Teaching Strategies Designed to teach children positive alternative behaviours that meet the same need as the challenging behaviour. e.g, How to… request assistance communicate a need, interact with a peer complete a classroom task.

90 Teaching Strategies Fundamental Peer Mediated Self-monitoring Teacher-mediated Affect awareness and Anger Management

91 Missing in Action SOCIAL SKILLS

92 Social Skills The most common deficit underlying Yellow and Red Zone students: Not able to perform them! Need to be taught them!

93 Social Skills Groups Generalization is the problem! THE SCHOOL must provide opportunities for practice MUST BE REINFORCED IN THE CLASSROOM! Go to “SSD” under PBIS compendium

94 PBIS Compendium A Directory of Social Skills Explicit Lesson Plans to teach them SOCIAL RELATIONSHIP SKILLS 3.0 Say thank you… 3.9Introduce yourself 3.10Introduce others. 311Respect personal space 3.12Recognize social limits (strangers, formal, familiar, family) 3.13Touch appropriately 3.14Begin a conversation 3.15Maintain a conversation 3.16End a conversation 3.17Join in (gain attention appropriately) 3.18*Interrupt appropriately 3.19*Apologize

95 Social Skill Teaching DEAL WITH DISAPPOINTMENT/LOSING 2.12 Goal: To improve skills for expressing feelings Objective(s): The student will decide why an activity was not successful and whether to try the desired activity again. (Mayo and Walto, 1986 p. 274) Process Steps: 1. Say to yourself "Somebody has to lose" or "It's okay that I wasn't successful." 2. Think about your choices. a. Ask for help. b. Do an activity you like to do. c. Do a relaxation exercise. 3. Act out your best choice. 4. Reward yourself for trying. Discuss Definition: Disappointment means to fail to meet your own or someone else's expectations. Losing is a failure to win or gain. Rationale: You learn to deal with disappointment or losing in a good way to decrease stress and negative self thoughts.

96 Dealing with Disappointment Continued Role Play Your team comes in last place in the city baseball league. You lose a contest. Your team loses at soccer. You don't make the cheerleading squad after weeks of practice. You flunk a test you studied for. Your parents say you can't get an after-school job. You lose again at a game your brother always wins. Your best friend won't join an activity that's important to you. You are turned down for a date. Application with Feedback Students write stories with main character who is disappointed by failure or loss. During daily discussion time, provide opportunity for students to share disappointments and plans for trying activity again. Class writes/performs skit or play focused on a disappointment and how the main character reacts. Can be performed for another class or parents. Ask parents to evaluate their child's use of the skill by using a provided role play or by observing their child using the skill. Keep a home journal describing results and feelings for situations involving disappointment of yourself and/or family members.

97 Anger/Anxiety Management

98 The Anxiety/Behavior Curve

99 The 5 Point Scale A Simple Method for Teaching about Anger and Anxiety Student identifies his/her triggers Student identifies options at each step Teacher and student use a cueing technique to communicate in class

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101 A. Teaching and Competence Strategies: Peer-Mediated Strategies Peer Proximity Peer Prompting Peer-Initiation Guidelines for Using Peer-Prompting and Peer Initiation Peer Buddies

102 B. Teaching and Competence Strategies: Teacher-Mediated Strategies Social Stories and Puppets Empowering Roles Structured Games or Play Groups Friendship Activities

103 Enthralling?

104 Altered Response Strategies Teacher’s response is altered Intention is to alter the payoffs or functions of the behavior

105 They are just kids

106 Altered Response Strategies: Proven Positive Responses De-escalate and Resist Conflict Promote Peace Catch Being Good Counter Conflict With Consequences for Caring Negotiate Response Choices Reframe with Empathy Encourage Coping Natural and Logical Consequences Praise Effectively

107 PEBS Altered Response Strategies “Checkin” a response strategy to give students attention Attention for positive behaviours RELATIONSHIP is KEY

108 PEBS Matrix-based Check-in Your School Name: Week: Respect forMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday Self0 1 2 Others0 1 2 Learning0 1 2 Environment0 1 2 Total Teacher signatureHome Signature Student Goal for the WeekTotal score for the Week: Scores0 = contributed negatively to classroom environment 1 = did not contribute positively or negatively to classroom environment 2 = contributed positively to classroom environment

109 Individualized Weekly Checkin Your School Name: Goal for the week: Completing seatwork Week: PeriodMondayTuesdayWednesdayThursdayFriday Math0 1 2 Gym0 1 2 Recess0 1 2 Daily Total Teacher signature Home signature Student Goal for the WeekTotal score for the Week: Scores0 = did not attempt work 1 = attempted work 2 = completed work

110 Individualized Daily Checkin Your School Name: Week: PeriodWear shoes to class Comments – POSITIVE ONLY Math0 1 2 Gym0 1 2 Recess0 1 2 Daily Total0 1 2 Teacher signature Home signature Student Goal for the WeekTotal score for the Week: Scores0 = did not meet goal 1 = partially met goal 2 = met goal

111 Individualized Daily Checkin Your School Name: Week: PeriodWear shoes to class Comments – POSITIVE ONLY Math0 1 2 Gym0 1 2 Recess0 1 2 Daily Total0 1 2 Teacher signature Home signature Student Goal for the WeekTotal score for the Week: Scores0 = did not meet goal 1 = partially met goal 2 = met goal

112 Individualized Daily Checkin continued Your Elementary School Name: Week: PeriodWear shoes to class Stay where directed Comments Math0 1 2 Gym0 1 2 Recess0 1 2 Daily Total Teacher signature Home signature Student Goal for the WeekTotal score for the Week: Scores0 = did not meet goal 1 = partially met goal 2 = met goal

113 Individualized Daily Checkin continued Your Elementary School Name: Week: PeriodStay in seatKeep hands to self Comments Math0 1 2 Gym0 1 2 Recess0 1 2 Daily Total Teacher signature Home signature Student Goal for the WeekTotal score for the Week: Scores0 = did not meet goal 1 = partially met goal 2 = met goal

114 Time Out: Another Altered Response Can be an appropriate consequence if the function is ATTENTION NOT effective if the function is ESCAPE

115 TIME OUT 1 minute per year of Mental Age Graded Time-Out: 1. Seat in class 2. Seat in hallway (or other supervised locale) 3. Go to office IGNORE, IGNORE, IGNORE

116 Section 4: Implement Positive Support Plan and Monitor Progress A.Indicate Progress-Monitoring Procedures B.Complete Information on Goal Attainment Ratings C.Record Benchmark Ratings on Goal Attainment Rating Chart D.Record other progress-monitoring data on Progress Rating Chart

117 A. Indicate Progress-Monitoring Procedures A checklist to guide thinking on what data will be used tracking? How often will they be collected? Who will collect them? e.g., benchmark ratings test scores Social Competence Checklist scores checkin scores

118 B. Complete Information on Goal Attainment Ratings Which goal are you recording in the chart below? Improving Positive Behavior Reducing Challenging Behavior

119 Now it is Time to Implement the Program and Gather the Data!!

120 How much time do we try the Program? At least 10 weeks Take into account startup time, breaks, holidays, illnesses, etc. Give the teacher a Weekly Implementation Sheet for his or her desk

121 Fidelity Issues Are staff doing what they said they would do? Role plays outside of class Observation in class “booster” support 3 weeks after FAIS meeting often required.

122 C. Record Benchmark Ratings Table is designed to take 20 observations If weekly, choose Tuesdays and Thursdays For high-incidence behaviors, rate just one class or session each date Indicate with an “x” in the appropriate column/row

123 Weekly Implementation Tracking Scale RatingConcernWeek 1 Date: Week 2 Date: Week 3 Date: TuesdayThursdayTuesdayThursdayTuesdayThursday +3 +2 +1 0 -2 -3

124 Examples of Benchmark Plotting RatingConcernWeek 1 Date: TuesdayThursday +3Aggression: 5 incidents a day +2Aggression: 6 incidents a day +1Aggression: 8 incidents a day X 0Aggression: 10 incidents a day X Aggression: 12 incidents a day -2Aggression: 14 incidents a day -3Aggression: 16 incidents a day

125 Plot in FAIS table Summarize benchmark scores in available table in FAIS Watch for trends Over 10 weeks, are our interventions working? Track any relevant factors (e.g., family factors, illness) on graph

126 FAIS Plot: Connect the Dots! +3xxxx +2xxxxx +1xxxx 0xxxx -2x -3

127 Step 5: Evaluate Outcomes and Plan Next Steps A.Summarize student progress toward goal B.Analyze Progress C.Plan Next Steps D.Design New Strategies E.Specify Final Team Recommendations and Consensus Statements Specify next meeting date

128 A. Summarizing Progress Did the student make progress towards the goal in 10 weeks of consistent programing? Indicate Final Goal rating across raters and across outcome measures

129 B. Analyze Progress Describe current progress and goal performance in words Summarize what facilitated progress Summarize what impeded progress

130 New strategies?

131 C. Plan Next Steps Evaluate: Was the intervention established with fidelity and quality? Was the monitoring of data sufficient? Statement of Revised Goal if necessary

132 D. Design New Strategies What else could we add or try? Who will carry these out?

133 E. “Forgetaboutit” American IDEA stuff on the paper form – not on our online version

134 F. Specify Final Team Recommendations and Consensus Statement In words, what is the team recommending?

135 Consensus Statement “The team agreed to implement the functional assessment and intervention plan specified in this document an reached consensus on documented outcomes” Or The team has not reached agreement on the intervention plan or documented outcomes and will reconvene on _____date for the purpose of _________

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137 Signatures Team members sign

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139 Crisis Plan A plan to cope with students who escalate to physical violence Specify steps, response, and who will do what Consider PEBs matrix and NVCI tactics

140 Crisis Plan Template A Microsoft Word Table that has several steps, from initial agitation through to NVCI restraint Predictable escalation steps on left, staff response on right of Table

141 The Anxiety/Behavior Curve

142 Crisis Plan Example When the Student Staff willPerson Responsible 1.Joe shows evidence of anxiety (e.g., shouts in class, slamming a door, pacing) Classroom teacher will redirect to a safe place in a supportive tone (Joe, please step out into the hallway – I’ll be with you in a minute) Classroom teacher

143 Crisis Plan Example When the Student Staff willPerson Responsible 2. Joe refuses to go to safe place Teacher gives Joe a choice, stating the expectation before consequence (e.g., Joe you have a choice, you can go in the hallway or if you refuse you will have to go to the office). Allow him time to process the choice. Classroom teacher

144 Crisis Plan Example When the Student Staff willPerson Responsible 3. Joe still refuses to go Send peer or “red card” to principal’s office for assistance Teacher Peer Administrator, guidance or resource or designated staff Office staff to page responding staff

145 Crisis Plan Example When the Student Staff willPerson Responsible 4. Joe pushes a student Remove students from the classroom NVCI team to assemble outside the classroom Teacher NVCI team

146 Crisis Plan Example When the Student Staff willPerson Responsible 5. Joe throws a chair at the staff NVCI team restraint as appropriate to ensure safety NVCI Team

147 Crisis Plan Example When the Student Staff willPerson Responsible 6. Joe calms during restraint NVCI team will talk calmly to the student, reestablish communication with student NVCI team

148 Crisis Plan Considerations Do you have NVCI trained staff? Can parents support? RCMP? Who are the best staff to respond? Time-out?

149 What is the Right Approach? Think Like SpockIntervene Like Kirk


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