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Functional Assessment Intervention System (FAIS) “Light Version”

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Presentation on theme: "Functional Assessment Intervention System (FAIS) “Light Version”"— Presentation transcript:

1 Functional Assessment Intervention System (FAIS) “Light Version”
Presented by: AVRSB Psychologists

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3 a behavioural assessment and program plan for “Yellow Zone” students
FAIS Light = a behavioural assessment and program plan for “Yellow Zone” students

4 Positive Effective Behaviour Support (PEBS)
Continuum of School-Wide .Instructional and Positive .Behaviour Support 5%TERTIARY PREVENTION Red Zone SECONDARY PREVENTION 15% Yellow Zone Fix the 5 BIGGEST IDEAS PRIMARY PREVENTION  80% Green Zone

5 FAIS Light and PEBS Every behaviour has a function.
Identify the function of the problem behaviour. Teach an alternative behaviour that serves the same function. Adapt environment to promote use of alternative behaviour. “Behaviour is predictable, thus preventable”

6 Programming Links: FAIS LIGHT Adaptations FAIS (full) IPP

7 FAIS Light - Program Planning Process
Identification of student with behaviours of concern. Exploration of classroom strategies by teacher / Problem-Solving meeting at school. Referral to Program Planning Team meeting to complete the FAIS Light (parents, teachers, administrator, Guidance, School Psychologist, other Student Services staff as appropriate).

8 FAIS Light - Program Planning Process (cont.)
Follow-up Program Planning Team meetings to evaluate FAIS Light plan. Next step: Monitor/Revise plan. The team may decide to refer to Behavioural Intervention Team.

9 Structure of FAIS Light
Identify Concern, Function, and Positive Alternative Behaviour. Design Positive Support Plan. Evaluate Progress and Plan Next Steps.

10 A. Identify the Priority Concern
What difficulty or problem is causing the greatest concern?

11 Criteria for Identifying and Describing the Priority Concern
Have the classroom teacher identify the concern that MOST interferes with the child’s productive functioning and the learning environment. As a team, describe the concerns in concrete and observable terms, when it happens, and how it happens. Ensure there is consensus regarding the behaviour description.

12 Examples of a Priority Concern:
Talking out during small group time. Wandering around during independent work. Insults classmates on the playground. Easily agitated and prone to anger outbursts.

13 B. Identifying Context/Setting Conditions
Describe distant or proximal situations that contribute to the behaviour. Setting (e.g., hallways) Task/Activity (e.g., large group) Specific Triggers (e.g., adult request)

14 Check all context or setting conditions in which the student is most likely to have difficulties.
Classroom Special Class Hallways Cafeteria Playground Bus Gym/Locker room Restroom Home Community setting Unstructured setting Unfamiliar setting Crowded setting Noisy setting Other       Task/Activity Large group Small group Partner task Independent task Difficult task Uninteresting task Specific task Specific materials Task transition Location transition Unstructured activity Unexpected activity Interruption in routine Other      Specific Triggers Not receiving attention Adult request Negative feedback Positive feedback Unclear expectations Sleepiness Physical discomfort Sick, allergies Over-stimulated Under-Stimulated Extreme Emotion Denied something Health issue Home issue Time of Day Arrival time Dismissal time Morning Afternoon Lunch Recess Non-specific Other Individuals Involved Particular adult(s) Particular peer(s) Authority figure Support staff Parents Strangers

15 Identifying the Function of the Behaviour
As a team, identify the apparent functions (underlying reasons, intents, or pay-offs) that cause the behaviour of concern.

16 C. Identify the Function of the Behavior Check all that apply.
Escape Avoid demand or request Avoid/Escape activity or task Escape classroom or setting Escape the school Escape consequences Other: Gain Attention/Control Get desired item Gain adult attention Gain peer attention Control situation Gain/Grab power Gain acceptance Other : Other Functions Communication Affiliation/Affirmation Self -expression Gratification Justice/Revenge Self-stimulation Other      Other Reasons Does not have skills Does not have motivation Does not know expectations Fears failure Medical problem Attentional problem Substance abuse Lack of security Transitional issue (e.g., divorce, home conflict)

17 Escape/Protection (Avoid task; Escape Consequence)
Tantrum at the start of each structured activity. Looks spacey when given math seatwork. Lights a cigarette as principal walks by.

18 Gain Attention/Control (Focus attention on self/Control an event, situation, or person)
Pulls his scribbler from teacher’s hands. Refuses to move out of her desk when requested. Burps loudly in class. Tells teacher off.

19 Other Functions: Communication (Lack of skill or experience)
- Withdraws from the group - Throws food that she doesn’t like Affiliation/Affirmation (Become wanted or chosen) - Chooses “troublemakers” as friends. - Acts silly to be popular. - Bullies other students to belong in negative peer group.

20 Other Functions: - Hoards the computer. Self-Expression
(Express feelings or needs) - Draws pictures of serial bombings or weird fantasies. Gratification (Feels good, rewards self) - Hoards the computer. - Refused to give up a toy in class.

21 Other Functions: Justice/Revenge (Settle a score, restitution)
- Destroys another’s work. - Grabs toys or objects from others. - Engages in physical aggression. Sensory Stimulation (Neurological needs or problems) - Sucks on clothes or clothing items. - Taps foot constantly. - Rocks body.

22 D. Identify Competencies and Positive Alternatives
Describe social or academic competencies that may serve as a positive alternative for the concern.

23 Designing the Positive Support Plan
Environmental strategies Teaching strategies Altered Response strategies

24 Environmental Strategies
Environmental strategies prevent or minimize the occurrence of the prioritized concern by adjusting or modifying the features of the classroom, school, or home environment.

25 Types of Environmental Strategies:
Problem Preventers Modifying Classroom Arrangements Optimizing Rules, Routines, and Transitions Techniques for Matching Instructional Demand with Learning Capability

26 A. Environmental Strategies: Problem Preventers
Signal Interference Child Cues Flexible Planning Proximity Control Cooperation Boosting

27 A. Environmental Strategies: Problem Preventers (cont.)
Remove Nuisance Objects Humour or Comic Relief Hurdle Helping or Joining with the Child Bother Bouncing

28 A. Environmental Strategies: Problem Preventers (cont.)
High Probability Requests Touch Control Foreshadow

29 Environmental Strategies: Modifying Classroom Environment
Seating Arrangement Adult Presence Optimize Room Arrangement

30 Environmental Strategies: Optimizing Rules, Routines, and Transitions
Clarify Directions and Expectations Provide Equivalent Choices Scaffold Prompts and Practice

31 Environmental Strategies: Optimizing Rules, Routines, and Transitions
Schedules and Routines Consensus Classroom Rules Streamline Transitions

32 Environmental Strategies: Techniques for Matching Instructional Demand and Learning Capability
Task-Skill Matching Class-Wide Peer Tutoring

33 Teaching Strategies Designed to teach children positive alternative behaviours that meet the same need as the challenging behaviour. Examples of competencies a child may need to develop include learning how to request assistance, how to communicate a need, how to interact with a peer, or how to complete a classroom task.

34 Priority Concern Behaviour
Positive Alternative Behaviour Talking out during small group time Raising hand to communicate answer; Being the group “reporter” Wandering around room during independent work Staying in seat and completing assignments Easily agitated, prone to anger outbursts Use coping and anger control skills

35 Types of Teaching and Competence Strategies:
Peer-mediated strategies Teacher-mediated strategies

36 Instruction in relaxation skills is an example of a teaching strategy.

37 A. Teaching and Competence Strategies: Peer-Mediated Strategies
Peer Proximity Peer Prompting Peer-Initiation Guidelines for Using Peer-Prompting and Peer Initiation Peer Buddies

38 B. Teaching and Competence Strategies: Teacher-Mediated Strategies
Social Stories and Puppets Empowering Roles Structured Games or Play Groups Friendship Activities

39 Altered Response Strategies
Teacher’s response is altered. Designed to minimize the occurrence of challenging behaviour by responding effectively AFTER behaviour occurs.

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41 Altered Response Strategies: Proven Positive Responses
De-escalate and Resist Conflict Promote Peace Catch Being Good Counter Conflict With Consequences for Caring

42 Example of an Altered Response Strategy:
De-escalate and resist conflict Maintain a calm style when responding to challenging behaviour. Resist matching the intensity of your response and becoming overly angry when the child is not complying. If you sense your escalation, “let go” of the situation for a while by walking away or focusing on another child. Use a “Patrol Pet” (e.g., stuffed animal that monitors classroom behaviour) to gently remind the child what he/she is expected to do (e.g., paying attention). Model for the child alternative actions to deal with anger and frustration.

43 Altered Response Strategies: Proven Positive Responses (cont.)
Negotiate Response Choices Reframe with Empathy Encourage Coping

44 Altered Response Strategies: Proven Positive Responses (cont.)
Natural and Logical Consequences Praise Effectively

45 The Problems with Punishment (negative consequence)
It is a stopgap measure that may temporarily suppress the behaviour but does not address the “why” or function behind the behaviour. It does not provide guidance to students by indicating what they should do differently to meet their needs. It is associated with unwanted side effects – aggression, avoidance, or emotional outbursts. It often leads to an INCREASE in the very behaviour targeted to decrease.

46 Altered Response Strategies: Guidelines for Judicious Use of Negative Consequences
Use infrequently and Only as Transition Tools Rehearse Consequences Balance with Positive Think About How Given

47 Developing the Positive Support Plan
As a team, brainstorm positive support strategies (i.e., environmental, teaching, and altered response strategies) to reinforce the positive alternative behaviour. Enter a few feasible strategies into the Positive Support Plan table.

48 Evaluate Progress and Plan Next Steps
On the review date, Program Planning Team meets. Describe student’s current progress with the behavioural adaptations. Summarize strategies that facilitated progress. Summarize strategies that impeded progress. Plan next steps. Monitor/Revise plan. The team may decide to refer to Behavioural Intervention Team.

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50 Student with Behaviours of Concern
Meet Alexander: Alexander exhibits physical aggression (e.g., hitting, yelling), verbal aggression (e.g., taunting), and defiance daily toward peers and playground supervisor on the playground (i.e., recess periods). Alexander is rejected by his peers (e.g., plays alone, seldom chosen as partner) daily within the classroom.

51 Functional Assessment and Intervention System FAIS-LIGHT RECORD FORM
Based on the FAIS by Karen Stoiber, PhD Students Name Alexander Doe Grade 4 School Happy Days School Age 10 Team meeting date September 14, 2007 Team Members Names Role Mr. Terry Ific Teacher Mr. and Mrs. Doe Parents Mrs. Ima Incharge Principal Ms. Lotta Help Educational Assistant Ms. Rita Thefaismanual Psychologist

52 Check all context or setting conditions in which the student is most likely to have difficulties. (ALEXANDER) Setting Classroom Special Class Hallways Cafeteria Playground Bus Gym/Locker room Restroom Home Community setting Unstructured setting Unfamiliar setting Crowded setting Noisy setting Other       Task/Activity Large group Small group Partner task Independent task Difficult task Uninteresting task Specific task Specific materials Task transition Location transition Unstructured activity Unexpected activity Interruption in routine Other      Specific Triggers Not receiving attention Adult request Negative feedback Positive feedback Unclear expectations Sleepiness Physical discomfort Sick, allergies Over-stimulated Under-Stimulated Extreme Emotion Denied something Health issue Home issue Time of Day Arrival time Dismissal time Morning Afternoon Lunch Recess Non-specific Other Individuals Involved Particular adult(s) Particular peer(s) Authority figure Support staff Parents Strangers

53 C. Identify the Function of the Behavior (Alexander)
Check all that apply. Escape Avoid demand or request Avoid/Escape activity or task Escape classroom or setting Escape the school Escape consequences Other: Gain Attention/Control Get desired item Gain adult attention Gain peer attention Control situation Gain/Grab power Gain acceptance Other : Other Functions Communication Affiliation/Affirmation Self -expression Gratification Justice/Revenge Self-stimulation Other      Other Reasons Does not have skills Does not have motivation Does not know expectations Fears failure Medical problem Attentional problem Substance abuse Lack of security Transitional issue (e.g., divorce, home conflict)

54 Positive Support Strategies When and Where Implemented
Design Positive Support Plan (Alexander) Positive Support Strategies Strategy Steps Who will Implement When and Where Implemented Environmental Strategies – to counter the influence of setting conditions or specific triggers Optimize rules, routines, and transitions Wake up Alexander 15 minutes earlier Parents Daily: Home Modify classroom arrangement Greet Alexander at school entrance Teacher and playground supervisor Daily in morning: School Problem Preventers Seat Alexander near peers with advanced social skills. Teacher Daily: Classroom Classroom social problem-solving sessions. Guidance/ School Psychologist Bi-weekly: Classroom Teaching Strategies – to enhance or develop positive alternative behaviors that achieve the same function Fundamental strategies Leadership tasks (need for power/control) Teacher-mediated strategies Structured play (need for acceptance) Playground supervisor Daily: Playground Affect awareness and anger management Role-play activities concerning positive social interactions Guidance/ School Psychologist Altered Response Strategies – to counter functions or “pay-offs” maintaining the priority concern Proven Positive Responses Behavioural monitoring of positive recess play Cooperation Promoters Choice in school and home reward for attaining specified criterion of positive social interactions. Teacher and parents When warranted: Social and Home Praise for appropriate social interactions All team members When observed: School and Home Positive note home When warranted: School

55 C. Identify the Function of the Behavior (Alexander)
Check all that apply. Escape Avoid demand or request Avoid/Escape activity or task Escape classroom or setting Escape the school Escape consequences Other: Gain Attention/Control Get desired item Gain adult attention Gain peer attention Control situation Gain/Grab power Gain acceptance Other : Other Functions Communication Affiliation/Affirmation Self -expression Gratification Justice/Revenge Self-stimulation Other      Other Reasons Does not have skills Does not have motivation Does not know expectations Fears failure Medical problem Attentional problem Substance abuse Lack of security Transitional issue (e.g., divorce, home conflict)

56 Alexander: Positive Support Plan (cont.)
Resources needed for Positive Support Plan: (Parents, teacher, playground supervisor, and Guidance/ school psychologist ) Review date: October 12, 2007

57 Alex: Evaluate progress and plan next steps
Describe student’s current progress with the behavioural adaptations. - Reduction of physical and verbal aggression, increased peer acceptance, as well as the emergence of peer-related social competencies. Summarize strategies that facilitated progress. - Wake up Alexander 15 minutes earlier. - Greet Alexander at school entrance. - Classroom social problem sessions. - Leadership tasks (need for power/control). - Structured play (need for acceptance). - Role-play activities concerning positive social interactions. - Behavioural monitoring of positive recess play. - Choice in school and home reward for attaining specified criterion of positive social interactions. - Praise for appropriate social interactions. Positive note home. Summarize strategies that impeded progress. - He did not respond well to seating change. Plan next steps. Remove seating strategy. Continue and monitor. Next program planning meeting date: March 10, 2008.


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