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Support the spread of “good practice” in generating, managing, analysing and communicating spatial information Participatory Video “It takes two to speak.

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Presentation on theme: "Support the spread of “good practice” in generating, managing, analysing and communicating spatial information Participatory Video “It takes two to speak."— Presentation transcript:

1 Support the spread of “good practice” in generating, managing, analysing and communicating spatial information Participatory Video “It takes two to speak the truth - one to speak and another to hear.” Henry Thoreau Orientation Project Implementation Reporting & Sustainability This Module is an adaptation of training methods developed by InsightShare. For more information, please visit

2 How does InsightShare teach PV? 2

3 What is participatory video in a nutshell? Participants (men, women, youth) rapidly learn to use video equipment through games and activities. Facilitators help groups identify and analyse important issues in their community. Short videos and messages are directed by the participants. Footage is shown to the wider community at daily screenings. A dynamic process of community-led learning is set in motion.

4 What can we do with it? Awareness raising, campaigns and advocacy (horizontal communication) Knowledge and innovation sharing (horizontal communication) Giving people a sense of worth and a voice (empowerment and therapy) Watch the video “Insights into Participatory Video” and see which ones are which.

5 What can PV offer? PV : –engages; –empowers; –clarifies; –amplifies; –catalyses; –is inclusive and flexible; –is accessible; –equips people with skills and positive attitudes; –disseminates good practice.

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7 Reflections on the Name Game! Ice breaker Introduces the equipment Experiential learning Hands over control immediately Shows trust Equaliser Overcomes fear and builds confidence Technical learning (see pages 26 and 27 of the handbook) –On/off –record on/off –red light –sound –silhouettes –sound issues

8 Other games Disappearing Game –builds confidence in pressing record so all can do –shows magic of video and ability to manipulate time and play with reality Twist in Frame –builds trust and intimacy –participants practise framing and seeing through the “eye” of the camera –introduces unusual angles –linking camera to TV –teaches that the director is in charge

9 Storyboard method 9

10 Why use storyboards? Helps bring together different ideas, viewpoints, methods and experiences in one story around a common theme Can help to build consensus Helps people communicate ideas and feelings in a visually interesting way with different locations and presenters Helps participants understand how to tell a story as a visual piece, with a beginning, a middle and an end Enables facilitator to include everyone Helps to create a particular plan from which filming can begin

11 Analysis tools Mapping Problem tree Prioritising Rivers of Life interview methods A Day in the Life Visioning exercise Others?

12 Practise session Get into two groups of six. In each group, choose two people to be facilitators and four people to be community members. The facilitators leave the room. The community members decide what kind of issues they face and what kind of role they have in the community. The facilitators decide what kind of PRA method they’d like to use and who is going to do what. Facilitators work with participants and: –conduct a PRA exploration; –draw a storyboard. Participants film the role play developed in the storyboard, 1 scene at a time (1 min per scene max).

13 Screening back Imagine you are still in your fictional community! Team A and B all gather around the TV. Team A begins! The “facilitators” invite a “community member” to learn how to plug the camera into the TV and play back the footage. Team B pretends that they are members of the Team A community who weren’t involved in the PV filming, but who have now come to watch the film their neighbours have been making. Everyone watches the whole film.

14 Screening back “Facilitators” generate discussion from the “community members”: –Congratulate them on their achievement. –Ask what they liked about it. –Ask them how they would change or improve it. Ask them to imagine that they are outsiders; would they be convinced by their campaign? –Is their case strong enough? Is there anything missing? –Ask the “community members” who weren’t part of the filming (i.e. Team B) for their feedback. Would they like to add anything on camera? –Plan new filming! –Discuss audience strategies: who will see the film, how, where…? Repeat with Team B.

15 Reflection from practise session Think and listen –The four “facilitators” come together and brainstorm the question: How did it feel to be a facilitator? –The eight “community members” come together and reflect on how it felt to be facilitated. Group discussion –Team A and B come together. Write a list of facilitation tips and principles, including managing screenings and dealing with obstacles. –Both teams present their list for general discussion.

16 16 Consent, editing and finishing

17 Be clear from the beginning how the PV process is going to work and then stick to your commitments. Manage expectations. Editing: –Train community members, if practical. –Do a paper edit. –Edit in the community. –Do regular screenings of half-edited films and seek input. –Use images of the process if you can.

18 Consent, editing and finishing Discuss possible negative repercussions. Seek consensus from all community members on the final version. Seek consent and permission to show the film to outsiders. Record this consent on camera. Ensure community members have their own copies of the film.

19 Technical tips, further reading and resources This Module is an adaptation of training methods developed by Insight, an organisation dedicated to promoting the practice of participatory video. For more information about PV as practiced by Insight and its partners, please visit Read Insight’s handbook by Nick and Chris Lunch, which can also be downloaded from the website. Other publications on participatory video include: –Participatory Video by Jackie Shaw and Clive Robertson (1997) –Participatory Video by Shirley White (2003) –Eyes See, Ears Hear by Donald Snowden Cameras change all the time, but as a minimum requirement we recommend using a camera with a microphone in socket and a headphone socket. Avoid memory stick cameras and DVD cameras.


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