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Marketing Yourself Into Your First Job a Blue Bridge presentation to Seattle Pacific University seniors during Life After College week 12 January 2015.

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Presentation on theme: "Marketing Yourself Into Your First Job a Blue Bridge presentation to Seattle Pacific University seniors during Life After College week 12 January 2015."— Presentation transcript:

1 Marketing Yourself Into Your First Job a Blue Bridge presentation to Seattle Pacific University seniors during Life After College week 12 January 2015

2 Today’s Agenda Introduction of career coach Elizabeth Atcheson Strategy and marketing: key components of career development What are your marketing communications tools? Networking and informational meetings: 95% of you will land jobs through this process Thanking and follow-up: THE SECRET SAUCE Q&A

3 Where You Are Now… You have done some career assessment using the resources of the Center for Career and Calling You have an interim strategy SO… …You are ready to start marketing yourself!

4 FIRST: Develop your INTERIM Personal Narrative  Your “elevator pitch”  A few sentences that frame you and what you’re exploring  Should highlight your field, your interests, your theme, your focus – what fascinates you  Content: how you got here, what you want to do next, and what you hope for from them (your “ask”)

5 Four Elements of Your Personal Narrative [see handout] 1)Your year and major at SPU, and your special interest within major area 2)Any experience that demonstrates “boots on the ground” in your interest area 3)The field you’re exploring/learning about 4)Your ask: Do you happen to know anyone who works in [communications, physical therapy, web development, etc.] I could talk to?

6 Woven into your narrative: Your Positioning Definition: Positioning is a concise summary of...  the key attributes of a product/service...  that differentiate it from the competition

7 YOU are a product being introduced to the job marketplace So you must know your key differentiating attributes

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9 Tip: Your STRENGTHS Differentiate You Personal qualities like patience Special abilities like fluency in a language Training or education (your MAJOR!) Experience in a particular field related to your major Enjoyment of something most people despise Detail orientation or ability to focus Excellent people skills Flexibility in your personal life (e.g., to travel)

10 Include your positioning (i.e. what makes you different) in your LinkedIn “headline” or your resume Summary Karl Telander Senior at Seattle Pacific University majoring in Accounting with internship experience in Accounting Office of Casa Latina and excellent Spanish conversation skills

11 Include your positioning (i.e. what makes you different) in your LinkedIn “headline” or your resume Summary Amanda Jennio Senior at Seattle Pacific University majoring in Communications with internship experience in development office of non-profit and excellent writing skills

12 Helpful Hints to create your positioning 1)Look at your STRENGTHS 2)Ask yourself: what DIFFERENTIATES you from other likely job/career-seekers in your competitive space? 3)Phrase and frame – you’re responsible for what people think of you 4)Be honest – always! Don’t exaggerate – ever!

13 “Born in conservation” ….phrase and frame

14 Marketing YOU: Your Marketing Communications The basics....make them professional! Your recorded phone greeting (smile, stand up) The way you answer your phone (smile, professional) Your address (not not hotmail or AOL or Yahoo, per recruiters) – your NAME is your BRAND – use it in WHOLE FORM in your address, to help them remember your Your signature – , cell number, link to public LinkedIn profile (and summary statement?)

15 Key Tool in Your Marketing Toolbox: Your Online Profile and Visibility Who you “are” online is increasingly important in career development, because…  The first thing people do is Google you  You can build a reputation that precedes you and lays the groundwork for a relationship or career opportunity  You can be intentional about what you want people to know about you… AND…

16 Key Tool in Your Marketing Toolbox: Your Online Profile and Visibility Who you “are” online is increasingly important in career development, because…  Recruiters and hiring managers will be able to find YOU!!

17 Your Online Profile and Visibility: Facebook, Google, and LinkedIn These are the Three Big Dogs, so…  Clean up Facebook presence; check privacy settings; if you’re tagged in an uncomfortable photo, un-tag yourself and/or ask person to remove photo  Google yourself and correct or remove anything inaccurate if possible

18 Heighten Your Online Presence: LinkedIn To-Do’s  Create a LinkedIn profile using your “master” resume  Make your LinkedIn headline consistent with your Personal Narrative and Personal Positioning  Choose setting that makes it public (anyone can see it) so recruiters can find you  Choose setting that does NOT announce to the world every tweak you make  Use “Skills” section to spotlight skills that will be most valuable to prospective employers

19 Heighten Your Online Presence: LinkedIn To-Do’s: Your PHOTO  Smiling  Wearing professional clothing  Not a “party photo”  …and be SEVEN times more likely to be contacted!

20 Heighten Your Online Presence: LinkedIn To-Do’s – direct from LinkedIn Master resume >>> LinkedIn >>> take FREE LinkedIn webinar for job-seekers: https://help.linkedin.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/530/~/linkedi n-learning-webinars Join relevant (field-specific)LinkedIn groups and post to them Use LinkedIn’s Job Search Tips: Take LinkedIn webinar for job-seekers – once a month!

21 HONE Your Online Presence Position yourself towards the FUTURE job or career or field you’re aiming for… rather than your past

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23 Why do you need to network and set up informational meetings?

24 “What is the value I could bring to a prospective employer?”

25 95% of jobs are found through Informational Interviewing Is that a high enough percentage for you?

26 95% of jobs are found through Networking and Informational Interviewing …Jobs are created with you in mind …You become a vulture before the job is posted …You get into the interview pool

27 Networking = Connecting with People Friends and family Everyone you know on Facebook, LinkedIn Current and past colleagues Acquaintances from the gym, corner store Staff at trade associations in your target field Alumni and career offices of S.P.U. …um, pretty much EVERYONE – see p of your Center for Career and Calling booklet

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29 What are the goals of networking? Spread the word that you’re exploring Practice your personal narrative Refine your resume, LinkedIn, etc. Get emotional and practical support and guidance Introduce you to people you can contact for an informational interview

30 WHY is networking scary??

31 1)Don’t know how to get started 2)Don’t know what to say 3)Feel intimidated by more experienced people 4)Feel you have nothing to offer 5)Feel like a fraud or impostor because you have no affiliation other than being a student 6)Feel you’re asking for something but have nothing to give in return

32 To address “feeling” items 3, 4, 5, and 6: You’re More Solid Than You Think You’ve completed some self-assessment and reflection You’ve got (hopefully) some experience in a field you’re interested in Your coursework has prepared you to work in one or more fields…. …and most importantly….

33 You’re More Solid Than You Think You’re a young person and people WANT to help young people! Repeat this to yourself as often as you need to: you’re giving THEM an opportunity to do something they want to do

34 So… LOSE THE GUILT! [SEE HANDOUT]

35 How to Get Started: TIPS  Attend networking events with a friend  Smile and introduce yourself  Ask a question or two “What brings you to [this event]?” “Are you an SPU alum?” [and follow up!]  Use their name, to remember it

36 How to Talk About Yourself It’s easier to talk about yourself......when you have something to say

37 How to Talk About Yourself It’s easier to talk about yourself......when you have something to say And you have that on lock! (your personal narrative)

38 You will be talking to many, many people….

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40 So… Create it Now: Tracking System for Your Professional Network Keep track of who’s helping you with what, who connected you to whom, when you thanked them, etc. Excel spreadsheet or EverNote  First name  Last name  address  Relationship/Connection  Contact Date  Activity  Etc.

41 Informational Interviewing, step 1 Through networking, you talk to someone who knows someone in your target field You ask for an introduction to that person You offer to do the work yourself of contacting that person (why?), and assure him/her that you’ll use his/her name in the [see handout]

42 Informational Interviewing, step 2 Contact the person in your field via and ask for 20 minutes IN PERSON – not on the phone Emphasize your common connection (e.g., SPU alum) Offer to bring a latte for him/her (ask what kind) – an ETHICAL BRIBE!! If you don’t hear anything, write back again in 2 weeks (slightly different , no reference to first ) If you still don’t hear anything, make one phone call and do leave a complete message If you still don’t hear anything, let it go but let your contact know you tried, and thank your contact

43 Informational Interviewing, step 3: Preparation Have your resume and LinkedIn profile updated and complete before first contact, in case target is very responsive and asks for a resume right away Do homework before meeting; do NOT ask questions that could be answered online; know every page of company/organization’s website

44 Informational Interviewing, step 3: Preparation Scout ahead of time the location and office Arrive at reception no more than 5 minutes early (wait in your car/outside if necessary) Bring resumeS with you in professional- looking file folder Dress as if for a job interview Thank the person as you enter

45 Informational Interviewing, step 4...the informational interview itself YOU set the agenda and ask the questions [see second page of handout]

46 Informational Interviewing, step 4 Your objective is to learn 4 things: 1)What was your path to the work you’re doing now? 2)What do you like about your field or what you do? 3)What changes do you see happening? 4)Is there anyone else in this field you think would be interesting for me to talk to?

47 “What is the value I could bring to a prospective employer?”

48 Informational Interviewing, step 4 Take notes during the meeting – you will forget the specifics otherwise, and it makes you LOOK GOOD Offer to do the work yourself of contacting others (why?)

49 Informational Interviewing, Step 5: Follow-Up Send a meaningful thank-you via the same day or next day Send handwritten note also if person is elderly Refer specifically to their insights, suggestions Thank the person who referred you to the target

50 Follow-Up: The Secret Ingredient to Success

51 Follow-Up: The Secret Ingredient THANKING is a key skill that will further your career for decades to come [see handout]

52 Follow-Up: The Secret Ingredient Stay in touch regularly, especially after you meet with someone he/she suggested Let him/her know where you land Thank him/her each time you make contact

53 Follow-Up: The Secret Ingredient Farm your network; don’t just harvest it You are at square one of building a professional network for a lifetime

54 The “R” Rule It’s not about your resume; it’s about your relationships.

55 Summary: Marketing Yourself Differentiate yourself Network and explore and research your target field Conduct informational meetings with people working IN your target field Thank and follow-up, thank and follow-up, thank and follow-up…

56 Marketing YOU Questions?

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58 Get someone in your corner.


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