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Management and Organisation of Electricity Use Energy Efficient Lighting Techniques Belgrade November 2003.

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Presentation on theme: "Management and Organisation of Electricity Use Energy Efficient Lighting Techniques Belgrade November 2003."— Presentation transcript:

1 Management and Organisation of Electricity Use Energy Efficient Lighting Techniques Belgrade November 2003

2 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 2 Lighting in Industry General Observations l Lighting accounts for 10-15% of electricity consumption in a typical industry l Technology improvements and lighting control strategies can result to 30% - 50% cost savings l In retrofit the payback is in the order of 1-5 years l Achievable target: 1- 3 W/m 2 /100 Lux

3 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 3 Lighting in Industry Characteristics l Large and high spaces l Fixed working positions l Long work periods l Adverse conditions l Various illuminance levels l Central lighting control l Restricted maintenance opportunities

4 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 4 Luminous Intensity TASK lux EXAMPLE Lighting for infrequently used areas Interior walkways and car- parks Lighting for working interiors Storage houses Regular work Offices Drawing offices, laboratories Localised lighting for special tasks Final check of products Detailed and precise work Lighting in Industry Requirements

5 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 5 l Description LMS can automatically switch or dim lighting circuits by switching (time-, localised-, daylight-, occupancy-) l Application Are most cost-effective in a new or completely refurbished lighting installation l Potential Energy savings Vary from 20% to 40% Efficient Lighting Lighting Management Systems

6 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 6 GLS: Tungsten filament MBF: High pressure mercury discharge (fluorescent) MBIF: High pressure mercury discharge (metal halide) SON: High pressure sodium discharge SOX: Low pressure sodium discharge IND: Induction lamps

7 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 7 l Description Slimline (26mm) krypton-filled lamps are a direct replacement for 38 mm lamps. Available in all standard lengths and “white” (halophosphate) and good (triphosphor) colours l Potential Energy savings Typically 8% for equivalent light output l Payback Is attractive when standard tubes are replaced during routine maintenance Modern Light Fittings Slimline Fluorescent Lamps

8 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 8 l Description CFLs with integral gear are a direct replacement for tungsten lamps. Lamp life is typically 8,000 hours - eight times that of tungsten lamps. l Potential Energy savings 75% l Payback The lamps cost appr. 5 EURO each. If a 100 W bulb runs for 2,500 hrs/year and the average unit cost is 2.5 cent/kWh, replacing it with a CFL fitting will achieve a one year payback period Modern Light Fittings Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs)

9 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 9 l Description New ballasts type minimise iron and copper energy losses and still operate the lamp at or near nominal rated wattages Efficient Components Modern Ballasts Typical circuit watts (based on 230 mains voltage) of typical 26 mm fittings

10 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 10 l Description An electronic ballast converts the 50Hz power supply to 28-30,000 Hz, reducing both lamp and ballast requirements and increasing lamp and ballast life. HF lighting has  higher power factor,  lower sensitivity to voltage variations and  less light level depreciation with age than systems with standard ballasts. Efficient Components High frequency lighting

11 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 11 l Payback 2X58 Watt fitting costs payback period Efficient Components High frequency lighting

12 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 12 Efficient Lighting Useful hints l 26 mm diameter fluorescent tubes with high frequency control balasts are 25% more efficient than the older 38 mm with EM gear l At heights less than 7 m, fluorescent lamp luminaires with open reflectors can be used, at greater heights HPD lamps should be used

13 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 13 l Modern luminaires and reflectors have increase the efficient distribution of light by >30% l A combination of general area lighting together with local task lighting may result up to 20 % savings in comparison with a regular array of luminaires Efficient Lighting Useful hints

14 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 14 l Introduction of time and/or daylight controlled switch can achieve % of energy savings, with a 3 years pay back l HPD lamps with bi-level switch in unoccupied areas, by presence detectors can achieve up to 15% energy savings Efficient Lighting Useful hints

15 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 15 l Maximise the use of daylight to reduce the need for electric lighting l Roof lights disperce the light evenly over the whole floor area l Surfaces should be paint with mat colours of high reflectance Efficient Lighting Useful hints

16 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 16 Example of energy savings in lighting Existing situation Luminaire operating 2000 hours/year Incadescent lamp 60 W Electricity cost 0.08 euro/kWh Life cycle 1,000 hours Lamp cost 0.7 euro Annual cost 9.6 euro euro = 11 euro

17 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 17 Example of energy savings in lighting (cont.) Existing situation Luminaire operating 2000 hours/year CF lamp 11 W Electricity cost 0.08 euro/kWh Life cycle 8,000 hours Lamp cost 19 euro Annual cost 1.76 euro euro = 6.51euro

18 Chapter 6 Management and Optimisation of Energy Use Part III Page 18 Conclusions l Utilise the most energy efficient lamp/luminaire combinations l Maximise the use of day lighting l Localise lighting control l Use light coloured walls and ceilings l Motivate staff


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