Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Baseload Electricity quantify, address, manage 2a) Lighting baseload: effective & efficient use to shape & affect.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Baseload Electricity quantify, address, manage 2a) Lighting baseload: effective & efficient use to shape & affect."— Presentation transcript:

1 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Baseload Electricity quantify, address, manage 2a) Lighting baseload: effective & efficient use to shape & affect Presenter Todd Hoener, LEED accredited professional End-use energy specialist Renewable energy program administrator Certified home energy rater & Light commercial energy auditor Golden Valley Electric Association Fairbanks, Alaska w

2 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Lighting shapes & affects baseload Lighting is baseload electricity use Powered-up lamps Year-round behavior, choices But lighting is more. Its…visual

3 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Residential lighting profile Virtually 100 % of all households use electricity for lighting Average annual cost ~ 8 – 10 % of all household electricity Lighting use increases with household members & number

4 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Comparison of light efficiency

5 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 What to consider about lighting? Energy efficiency, performance Lower costs & reduced waste Control Comfort Quality, ability to see Mood, e.g., SAD Sensitivity, age, eyes Health & safety Functions & effective uses

6 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Lamp & fixture Lamp: Device converting electricity to light, produces lumens Fixture: Holds lamp

7 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Energy consumption Watt: Standard measurement of lamp Luminous Efficacy: Ratio of light produced to energy consumed, measured as number of lumens produced divided by rate of electricity consumption (lumens per watt) The higher the ratio, the more efficient the light Measured Lamp Lumens [Lumens] ÷ Measured Input Power [Watts]

8 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Light quantity Illumination: Distribution of light on horizontal surface (purpose of all lighting is to produce illumination) Lumen: Measurement of light emitted by a lamp As reference, 100-watt incandescent lamp emits about 1750 lumens.

9 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Light quantity Foot-candle: Intensity of illumination measured by amount of light produced by one lumen distributed over a 1-square-foot area

10 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Recommended fc levels

11 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Light quality Color temperature: Color of light source, measured in Kelvin (K) temperature Higher Kelvin temperatures (3600–5500 K), blue- green colors (e.g. overcast sky light), are considered cooler & produce higher contrast Lower color temperatures (2700–3000 K), yellow- red colors (like flames of fire), are considered warmer & preferred for living spaces

12 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Approximate color temperatures

13 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Light quality Color rendering: How colors appear when illuminated, generally considered more important lighting quality than color temperature Color rendering index (CRI) is a 1–100 scale that measures light source's ability to render colors same way as sunlight Light source with CRI of 80 or higher considered acceptable for most indoor residential applications

14 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 ~ CRI for various lamps

15 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Light quality Glare: Excessive brightness from direct light source Glare primarily result of relative placement of lamp source and object being viewed

16 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Types of lamps Incandescent (includes halogen) Fluorescent (includes compact fluorescent lamps) High intensity discharge (HID) (includes metal halide, high-pressure sodium, mercury vapor, low-pressure sodium) Light emitting diode (LED) Other

17 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Comparing lamp life costs

18 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Useful economic formulas Simple payback on an investment (in years) = = net installation costs ($) ÷ annual energy savings ($) Simple return on investment (in percentage, %) = = annual energy savings ($) ÷ net installation costs ($)

19 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Lighting use Ambient lighting: Provides general illumination for daily activities, safety and security Defines space

20 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Ambient lighting

21 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Lighting use Task lighting: Light to work by Place task light beside task, not in front Under-counter kitchen lights, table lamps, or bathroom mirror lights For reading, paper work, food preparation, laundry, games, hobbies, shop work Should be well diffused, coming from sides to eliminate shadows

22 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Task lighting

23 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Lighting types & uses Accent lighting: Draws attention; provides interest Usually 3 times level of ambient light

24 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Accent lighting

25 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Lighting use Natural lighting: Through windows, skylights, doors Varies in intensity & brightness depending on time of day, season or weather Use Low-E glazing to keep heat inside in winter & outside in summer Most important indicators of window's performance are U-factor and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC)

26 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Natural lighting

27 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Tubular skylights Natural lighting: Through tubular skylights Used where windows are not practical, Reflects light through a metal or plastic tube with a highly reflective interior coating and guides sunlight to a diffuser lens mounted on interior ceiling surface Can be used in windowless bathrooms, hallways, stairwells and closets Zero operating cost

28 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Natural light through tube

29 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Matching efficiency & luminance Cost of lighting is often evaluated by 5 criteria: Initial cost of fixture, lamp & placement Needed light output of fixture Lamp replacement costs comparisons Lumen output per input watt comparisons Energy costs comparisons

30 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Lighting controls Dimmers – adjust level of light Occupancy sensors – offers automatic switching Timers –switch at predetermined times Before purchasing & using any lighting controls, understand type of lamp to control to narrow selection Options vary

31 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Maintenance & operation Clean regularly Eliminate unnecessary light by relying on day- lighting whenever possible Replace two bulbs with one having a comparable number of lumens to increase lumens per watt Place fixtures on separate switches so they can be operated independently of each other

32 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Efficient & effective lighting Starts with good design & energy efficient lighting Benefits extend above & beyond efficiency & money Poor planning presents problems How & what to light How much light Remember the human element: needs & behavior

33 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Useful lighting resources US DOE Building Technologies Program National Lighting Bureau NAHB Green Home Building Guidelines ToolBase Services, c/o NAHB Research Center Partnership for Advancing Technology in Housing (PATH), supported by U.S. HUD

34 2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10


Download ppt "2010 Energy OutWest Reno, Nevada 12-Mar-10 Baseload Electricity quantify, address, manage 2a) Lighting baseload: effective & efficient use to shape & affect."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google