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Global Problems Ch. 8 (p.199-210)  What are some types of ethnic resurgence? When a person makes an effort to reclaim his/her heritage, he/she acquires.

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Presentation on theme: "Global Problems Ch. 8 (p.199-210)  What are some types of ethnic resurgence? When a person makes an effort to reclaim his/her heritage, he/she acquires."— Presentation transcript:

1 Global Problems Ch. 8 (p )  What are some types of ethnic resurgence? When a person makes an effort to reclaim his/her heritage, he/she acquires a name that is associated to or given by his/her ethnic group; he/she retreats to own ethnic's religious practices; and speaks own ethnic's language.  Do you see the trend of "...when an empire fell, so did its gods, often to be replaced by the apparently more powerful gods of the new conquerors" (204). How much of religion is embedded in politics and laws? Greeks and Egyptians – even the federal note has religious implications.

2 Chapter 8 (pg ) What is fundamentalism? Can you give an example of a fundamentalist practice and the behaviors associated with it?

3 Chapter 8 (pg ) Fundamentalism refers to a typically conservative and literal practice of scripture. Fundamentalism formerly referred to conservative, Bible-oriented American Christianity. Most fundamentalists forbid modern advances regardless of their affiliation. Islamic fundamentalists (pg. 212) Ultraorthodox Jewish factions Hindu fundamentalism Is global fundamentalism “short-sighted, anti-intellectual, antimodern, or out of touch with the ever changing nature of our world?” (pg. 213) Many fundamentalists are considered religious extremists who take their religion to extremes and often times use force to emphasize a point In the 21 st century, religion is intertwined with nationalism

4 Chapter 8 (pg ) Where does terror possess such overwhelming power? What are some acts of terror within the U.S.?

5 Chapter 8 (pg ) Terror demands attention, and has the ability to dominate headlines around the world Adam Lanza, James Holmes, the terrorists behind 9/11, Al-Qaeda Terror has the power to ensue fear and vulnerability among people, a community, a country Alternatives to terror? – Religion as resilience (Ghandi) – Ethnicity as resilience (ethnic, social, spiritual values) – Moral leadership as resilience (Dr. Martin Luther Kind Jr.)

6 Uprisings Jolt the Saudi-Iranian Rivalry What are the differences between Iran and Saudi Arabia?

7 Uprisings Jolt the Saudi-Iranian Rivalry Both have radically different visions of regional order, and they both aspire to be the leaders of the Islamic world. Saudi Arabia: – harbors a deep distrust in Iran; starting from the 1979 revolution and from Iran’s attempts to overturn the Arab Monarchy – Rests on a careful symbiosis with the clerical establishment, but accords ultimate primacy to the monarchy. Iran: – Ideology is antimonarchy and formalized clerical authority in politics.

8 Uprisings Jolt the Saudi-Iranian Rivalry At its core, the Iranian-Saudi rivalry is about power and money: two oil-rich giants, vying for control of the Strait of Hormuz (a water passage that accounts for almost 20% of all oil traded worldwide) Iran: after the Islamic Revolution strictly followed an anti-US policy (always deemed Saudi Arabia as an agent of the US in the Persian Gulf region that speaks for the US interests.) Saudi Arabia: Their concerns about Iran on the other side are mainly associated to its plans of expanding influence to other parts of the Persian Gulf region, especially in post-Saddam Iraq, and the quest to build its own nuclear arsenalPersian Gulf

9 Uprisings Jolt the Saudi-Iranian Rivalry Saudi Arabia has been an opponent of nuclear weapons in the Middle East. They even signed the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, and they are a member of the coalition of countries demanding a Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone in the Middle East…but the minute Iran considered getting nuclear weapons, Saudi Arabia’s first reaction was to do the same. Do you agree? Disagree? Why?

10 “Moderates” Redefined: How to Deal with Political Islam 9/11 attacks led Bush Admin. to generalize Middle Eastern political Islam as terrorism Muslim perception: War on terror= War on Islam American attacks on Muslim lands and Israeli support seen as an attack on Islam Contradiction between what the U.S. preached and practiced

11 “Moderates” Redefined: How to Deal with Political Islam Political experts argue political reform through engagement of mainstream Islamic political parties committed to change through the ballot box Those opposed to this view argue that Islamic groups would undercut pro-U.S. regimes and facilitate anti-U.S ones; Islamic law would be detrimental to civil rights and liberties Obama administration= “Smart Diplomacy” Declaration for future relations serves to eliminate the belief that the war on terror is a war on Islam, and signals towards social improvements

12 “Moderates” Redefined: How to Deal with Political Islam Policies that reflect change are necessary Al-Queda’s idealogical presence is diminishing in the wake of a shift of modernist thinking and traditional Islamic traditions Long-term commitment is necessary in the face of hostile or blacklisted regimes

13 “Moderates” Redefined: How to Deal with Political Islam Can the U.S and the Islamic Middle-Eastern nations ever coincide in a wholly peaceful manner, both in terms of action and perception?


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