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Author: J. Lynett Gillette Genre: Expository Nonfiction Big Question: What can we learn from studying fossils?

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Presentation on theme: "Author: J. Lynett Gillette Genre: Expository Nonfiction Big Question: What can we learn from studying fossils?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Author: J. Lynett Gillette Genre: Expository Nonfiction Big Question: What can we learn from studying fossils?

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3 REVIEW GAMES Story Sort Story Sort VocabularyWords Vocabulary Words:  Arcade Games Arcade Games Arcade Games  Study Stack Study Stack Study Stack  Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary  Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words Spelling City: Spelling Words

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5 suspend pendant conductor novel productive numeral reserve numerous preserve pending pendulum deduction novelty numerator reservoir conservatory appendix impending induct innovative aqueduct abduction perpendicular expenditure enumerate

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7 VOCABULARY WORDS  fragile  poisonous  prey  sluggish  specimens  treacherous  volcanic  excavation  geologists  paleontologists  quarry  roamed Vocabulary Words More Words to Know

8 Question of the Day What can we learn from studying fossils?

9 TODAY WE WILL LEARN ABOUT:  Build Concepts  Main Idea  Prior Knowledge  Build Background  Vocabulary  Fluency: Model Volume  Grammar: Possessive Nouns  Spelling: Latin Roots  Paleontology

10 FLUENCY MODEL VOLUME

11 FLUENCY: MODEL VOLUME  Listen as I read “Discovery!”  As I read, notice how I raise the volume of my voice to an appropriate level so that I can be heard by students at the back of the classroom. As I read the selection, I will vary the volume to emphasize important details.  Be ready to answer questions after I finish.

12 FLUENCY: MODEL VOLUME  What was the climate like at the time the dinosaurs lived?  By what process were the dinosaur bones preserved?

13 CONCEPT VOCABULARY  paleontologists – scientists who study prehistoric lifepaleontologists  quarry – place where stone is dug, cut, or blasted outquarry  roamed – wandered  Next Slide Next Slide

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16 CONCEPT VOCABULARY (To add information to the graphic organizer, click on end show, type in your new information, and save your changes.)

17 Objects of Study PeoplePlaces Paleontology

18 MAIN IDEA, PRIOR KNOWLEDGE TURN TO PAGE

19 PRIOR KNOWLEDGE WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT THE STUDY OF FOSSILS? K (What do you know?) W (What would you like to learn?) L (What did you learn?)

20 PRIOR KNOWLEDGE  This week’s audio explores the Tyrannosaurus rex on exhibit at the Chicago Field Museum. After we listen, we will discuss what you learned about Tyrannosaurus rex.

21 VOCABULARY WORDS

22  fragile – easily broken, damaged or destroyed  poisonous – containing a dangerous substance; very harmful to life and health  prey – animals hunted and killed for food by another animal

23 VOCABULARY WORDS  sluggish – lacking energy or vigor  specimens – examples of a group; samples  treacherous – very dangerous while seeming to be safe  volcanic – of or caused by a volcano

24 MORE WORDS TO KNOW  excavation – the act of uncovering by digging excavation  geologists – scientists who study the composition of the Earth or of other heavenly bodies, the process that formed them, and their historygeologists

25 MORE WORDS TO KNOW  paleontologists – scientists who study prehistoric life as represented in fossilized plants and animals paleontologists  (Next Slide) (Next Slide)

26 EXCAVATION

27 GEOLOGISTS

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29 GRAMMAR POSSESSIVE NOUNS

30  the fossil’s were perserved in cold wet mud  The fossils were preserved in cold, wet mud.  at Dawn the researchers walked to the resevoir  At dawn the researchers walked to the reservoir.

31 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  He decided to investigate his assistant’s report.  Assistant’s is a possessive noun. To make a singular noun show possession, add an apostrophe and –s.

32 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  A possessive noun shows ownership.  A singular possessive noun shows that one person, place, or thing has or owns something.  A plural possessive noun shows that more than one person, place, or thing has or owns something.

33 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  To make a singular noun show possession, add an apostrophe and –s.  the ranch’s landscape  James’s coat

34 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  To make a plural noun that ends in –s show possession, add an apostrophe.  five researchers’ collections  the bushes’ leaves

35 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  To make a plural noun that does not end in –s show possession, add an apostrophe and -s.  the children’s books  the women’s books

36 POSSESSIVE NOUNS POSSESSIVE NOUNS MAKE EACH NOUN POSSESSIVE. TELL IF IT IS SINGULAR OR PLURAL.  computer  computer’s - singular  Mr. Garcia  Mr. Garcia’s - singular  hornets  hornets’ - plural  student  student’s - singular  dinosaurs  dinosaurs’ - plural  fossil  fossil’s - plural  women  women’s - plural

37 POSSESSIVE NOUNS POSSESSIVE NOUNS MAKE THE UNDERLINED NOUNS POSSESSIVE.  Charles Camp collection of bones was discovered in New Mexico.  Charles Camp’s  The explorers trucks were stuck in the mud.  explorers’  Were the reptiles legs trapped in the mud?  reptiles’  Some of the Earth rocks contain iridium.  Earth’s

38 POSSESSIVE NOUNS POSSESSIVE NOUNS MAKE THE UNDERLINED NOUNS POSSESSIVE.  The geologists tests revealed arsenic in the bones.  geologists’  The men luggage was filled with digging tools.  men’s  The girl grandparents live near Ghost Ranch.  girl’s  Dr. Vogel seminar begins at noon.  Dr. Vogel’s

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40 suspend pendant conductor novel productive numeral reserve numerous preserve pending pendulum deduction novelty numerator reservoir conservatory appendix impending induct innovative aqueduct abduction perpendicular expenditure enumerate

41 Question of the Day Why would a paleontologist record each fossil find in a field diary?

42 TODAY WE WILL LEARN ABOUT:  Word Structure  Main Idea  Prior Knowledge  Graphic Sources  Vocabulary  Fluency: Echo Reading  Grammar: Possessive Nouns  Spelling: Latin Roots  Science: Triassic Dinosaurs  Global Warming  Paleontology

43 VOCABULARY STRATEGY: SUFFIXES PAGES

44 DINOSAUR GHOSTS: THE MYSTERY OF COELOPHYSIS PAGES

45 FLUENCY ECHO READING

46 FLUENCY: ECHO READING  Turn to page 179, first two paragraphs.  As I read, notice how I raise my voice to stress sentences such as “This was a great find.”  We will practice as a class doing three echo readings.

47 GRAMMAR POSSESSIVE NOUNS

48  todds book’s were all about phytosaurs  Todd’s books were all about phytosaurs.  the childs were excited about the inpending field  The children were excited about the impending field.

49 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  Singular possessive nouns show that one person, place, or thing has or owns something. Add an apostrophe and –s to form singular possessive nouns.

50 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  Plural possessive nouns show that more than one person, place, or thing has or owns something. Add an apostrophe to a plural noun ending in –s to form the possessive. If the plural noun does not end in –s, add an apostrophe and –s.

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52 suspend pendant conductor novel productive numeral reserve numerous preserve pending pendulum deduction novelty numerator reservoir conservatory appendix impending induct innovative aqueduct abduction perpendicular expenditure enumerate

53 Question of the Day What are some of the different ways that prehistoric animals have been fossilized?

54 TODAY WE WILL LEARN ABOUT:  Main Idea  Prior Knowledge  Graphic Sources  Vocabulary  Fluency: Model Volume  Grammar: Possessive Nouns  Spelling: Latin Roots  Science: Testing Hypotheses  Paleontology

55 DINOSAUR GHOSTS: THE MYSTERY OF COELOPHYSIS PAGES

56 FLUENCY MODEL VOLUME

57 FLUENCY: MODEL VOLUME  Turn to page 180, second paragraph.  As I read, notice how I speak louder to emphasize the question that ends the paragraph.  Now we will practice together as a class by doing three echo readings of this paragraph.

58 GRAMMAR POSSESSIVE NOUNS

59  the novels main character were a paleontologist  The novel’s main character was a paleontologist.  the dinosaur spyed his prey and he gave chase  The dinosaur spied his prey, and he gave chase.

60 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  Singular possessive nouns show that one person, place, or thing has or owns something. Add an apostrophe and –s to form singular possessive nouns.

61 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  Plural possessive nouns show that more than one person, place, or thing has or owns something. Add an apostrophe to a plural noun ending in –s to form the possessive. If the plural noun does not end in –s, add an apostrophe and –s.

62 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  Possessive nouns reduce wordiness so that writing flows more smoothly.  Wordy: the eyes of the dinosaur  Not Wordy: the dinosaur’s eye

63 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  Review something you have written to see if you can improve it by using possessive nouns in place of prepositional phrases.

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65 suspend pendant conductor novel productive numeral reserve numerous preserve pending pendulum deduction novelty numerator reservoir conservatory appendix impending induct innovative aqueduct abduction perpendicular expenditure enumerate

66 Question of the Day What questions do you think paleontologists ask themselves about why they do what they do?

67 TODAY WE WILL LEARN ABOUT:  Narrative Nonfiction/Text Features  Reading Across Texts  Content-Area Vocabulary  Fluency: Partner Reading  Grammar: Possessive Nouns  Spelling: Latin Roots  Science: Careers in Science

68 “DINO HUNTING” PAGES

69 FLUENCY MODEL PARTNER READING

70 FLUENCY: PARTNER READING  Turn to page 180, second paragraph.  Partners practice reading this paragraph aloud. Be sure to vary the volume of your voices. Offer each other feedback.

71 GRAMMAR POSSESSIVE NOUNS

72  new mexicos’ climate suits james just fine  New Mexico’s climate suits James just fine.  the bones at the site were to numerus to count  The bones at the site were too numerous to count.

73 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  Singular possessive nouns show that one person, place, or thing has or owns something. Add an apostrophe and –s to form singular possessive nouns.

74 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  Plural possessive nouns show that more than one person, place, or thing has or owns something. Add an apostrophe to a plural noun ending in –s to form the possessive. If the plural noun does not end in –s, add an apostrophe and –s.

75 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  Unlike the –s in the plural form of compound nouns, the possessive ‘s is always added at the end of the compound noun.  No: daughters-in-law car or daughter’s-in-law  Yes: daughter-in-law’s car

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77 suspend pendant conductor novel productive numeral reserve numerous preserve pending pendulum deduction novelty numerator reservoir conservatory appendix impending induct innovative aqueduct abduction perpendicular expenditure enumerate

78 Question of the Day What can we learn from studying fossils?

79 TODAY WE WILL LEARN ABOUT:  Build Concept Vocabulary  Main Idea  Imagery  Word Structure  Grammar: Possessive Nouns  Spelling: Latin Roots  Order Form/Application  Paleontology

80  Sometimes the main idea is directly stated in a paragraph, often in the first or second sentence.  If the main idea is not stated, students should ask themselves, “What is the big idea that all the sentences in this paragraph contribute to?”

81  The term imagery refers to the use of words that help readers experience the way things look, sound, smell, taste, or feel.  An image is any detail that stimulates one of the senses.

82  Imagery can make settings, characters, and actions seem more real.  Imagery is frequently used in everyday conversation as well as literature.

83  You can use your knowledge of suffixes as an aid in determining the meaning of an unfamiliar word.  Complete a chart identifying the base word, suffix, and meaning of these words.  Confirm word meanings using a dictionary.

84 SUFFIXES WordBase WordSuffixMeaning sulfurous climatic microscopic mysterious

85  The purpose of completing an order form is to purchase an item, and the purpose for completing an application is to apply for work or to a school or program.  These forms are on paper and online; they should be filled out completely and accurately.

86  An order form asks for your name and complete address as well as details on the item being purchased and the method of payment.

87  An application asks for identifying information such as name, address, and phone number, as well as information about your education and relevant experience.

88 ORDER FORM

89 GRAMMAR POSSESSIVE NOUNS

90  the little boy, was frightened by the sharks tooth  The little boy was frightened by the shark’s tooth.  To ensure a productiv expedition researchers must use reliable maps  To ensure a productive expedition, researchers must use reliable maps.

91 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  Singular possessive nouns show that one person, place, or thing has or owns something. Add an apostrophe and –s to form singular possessive nouns.

92 POSSESSIVE NOUNS  Plural possessive nouns show that more than one person, place, or thing has or owns something. Add an apostrophe to a plural noun ending in –s to form the possessive. If the plural noun does not end in –s, add an apostrophe and –s.

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94 suspend pendant conductor novel productive numeral reserve numerous preserve pending pendulum deduction novelty numerator reservoir conservatory appendix impending induct innovative aqueduct abduction perpendicular expenditure enumerate

95  Story test  Classroom webpage,  Reading Test  AR  Other Reading Quizzes  Quiz #


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